Chicken Teriyaki (Grilled)

Chicken Teriyaki Recipe

Chicken Teriyaki (鳥照り焼き) is a lunchtime staple in Japan, filling bento boxes being carted off to offices and schools alike. Teri refers to the lacquered sheen that teriyaki sauce develops on the surface of the chicken, while yaki means grilled. Almost any cut of chicken can be used, but chicken teriyaki is most commonly prepared with the leg meat (thighs or drumsticks) which is filleted to ensure it cooks evenly. The skin is left on the chicken to keep the meat moist and it takes on a wonderful caramelized hue while getting slightly crispy as it grills.

Long before sushi became the ambassador of Japanese cuisine to the rest of the world, chicken teriyaki invaded the west, and for better or worse it came to represent the whole of the Japanese culinary repertoire. Perhaps it was the short list of approachable ingredients or the exoticism of food from the far east. Whatever the reason, it’s become so ingrained in American food culture that even Paula Deen has a teriyaki recipe.

So what makes for an authentic teriyaki sauce?

It’s simple… equal parts soy sauce, mirin, sake, and sugar.

Grilled Teriyaki Chicken

It’s not that I have anything against those fancy sweet soy marinades with ginger, garlic, chili, green onions, sesame seeds, and or fruit puree in them, but sauces with these ingredients aren’t teriyaki sauce since they cloud the teri. Ginger, sesame seeds, green onions and chili are garnishes that are occasionally added after the chicken has been cooked.

Traditionally, the unseasoned chicken is grilled over coals then basted with teriyaki sauce. To tenderize and season the chicken all the way through, I brine it first in soy sauce and sugar, grill it, then shellac a few coats of teriyaki sauce on to finish. This seems to get the best balance of color, texture and flavour. I’ve written the directions for a broiler, but just reverse the cooking order (skin up, then down) if you are using a grill.

Teriyaki Sauce
By using maltose or honey in the teriyaki sauce, the sauce gets thick without having to add any cornstarch. If you do use honey, make sure you use one without a strong flavour of its own.

Serve this chicken teriyaki whole or chopped up on a bowl of steaming hot rice with some extra sauce. The leftovers make great oyako donburi which will be a topic for another post.

Note: I also have an easy pan-fried chicken teriyaki recipe

Equipment you'll need:

Chicken Teriyaki

for brine
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons Japanese soy sauce
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons mirin

4-6 skin-on filleted (boneless) chicken thighs

for teriyaki sauce
2 tablespoons mild flavored honey (or maltose)
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons mirin
2 tablespoons sake

Combine the water, soy sauce, brown sugar and mirin in large ziploc bag and add the chicken thighs. Press out as much air as you can and seal the bag. Let this sit in the fridge for at least an hour.

To make the teriyaki sauce, just add the honey, soy sauce, mirin and sake to a small sauce pan and boil over medium heat until the sauce is glossy and slightly viscous (it won’t get quite as thick as the jarred types). It should take on a caramelized taste but be careful not to burn it.

When you’re ready to grill the chicken, turn the broiler on and move the oven rack up to the upper position. Put a wire rack on a baking sheet (I use the rack out of my toaster oven), and put the chicken thighs skin side down onto the rack (the idea is to keep the meat elevated off the pan).

Grill until brown then flip so the skin side faces up. Baste the skin side with teriyaki sauce and continue to broil until the skin is golden brown with just a few charred spots. Give the chicken one final baste with the teriyaki sauce and serve.

  • http://janespice.com/ Ursula

    I prefer teriyaki very simple. Just like your recipe. And, havent really order teriyaki at restaurants lately, because it’s just too random.

  • http://janespice.com Ursula

    I prefer teriyaki very simple. Just like your recipe. And, havent really order teriyaki at restaurants lately, because it’s just too random.

  • http://colloquialcookin.canalblog.com/ Colloquial Cook

    Teriyaki is the one Japanese dish I never got to try. (hm, maybe not the only one, on second thought, but quite likely the most ubiquitous). Oh, talking about strong tasting honeys I got myself a jar of buckwheat honey. The honey guy at the market was like “it’s really strong, I mean, really strong” and he looked scared. That’s promising.
    Anyway, this dish looks really tasty.

    :-)

  • http://colloquialcookin.canalblog.com Colloquial Cook

    Teriyaki is the one Japanese dish I never got to try. (hm, maybe not the only one, on second thought, but quite likely the most ubiquitous). Oh, talking about strong tasting honeys I got myself a jar of buckwheat honey. The honey guy at the market was like “it’s really strong, I mean, really strong” and he looked scared. That’s promising.
    Anyway, this dish looks really tasty.

    :-)

  • http://kristinmacbride.com/ Kristin

    I love it when you can make something so delicious from something as inexpensive as chicken thighs. This is going on my list of meals to make for next week. Thanks!

  • http://kristinmacbride.com/ Kristin

    I love it when you can make something so delicious from something as inexpensive as chicken thighs. This is going on my list of meals to make for next week. Thanks!

  • http://easydoesitrecipes.blogspot.com/ Christelle

    Beautiful!! i am so hungru now!!

  • http://easydoesitrecipes.blogspot.com/ Christelle

    Beautiful!! i am so hungru now!!

  • http://souvlakiforthesoul.com/ Peter G

    Thanks for providing an authentic recipe for teriyaki Marc…it’s good to know I have all those ingredients in my cupboard.

  • http://souvlakiforthesoul.com Peter G

    Thanks for providing an authentic recipe for teriyaki Marc…it’s good to know I have all those ingredients in my cupboard.

  • http://simplyscrumptiousfoodie.com/ Jessie

    that looks amazing, I truly find Japanese cuisine to be very interesting. It’s actually one of my favorite cuisines to taste and explore!

  • http://simplyscrumptiousfoodie.com Jessie

    that looks amazing, I truly find Japanese cuisine to be very interesting. It’s actually one of my favorite cuisines to taste and explore!

  • http://www.figandcherry.com/ Christie @ Fig & Cherry

    Oooh I miss Japan! I always wondered what that brown sugary love-juice was made of. Yummy! :)

  • http://www.figandcherry.com Christie @ Fig & Cherry

    Oooh I miss Japan! I always wondered what that brown sugary love-juice was made of. Yummy! :)

  • http://www.sweetsfoods.com/ Gera @ SweetsFoods

    Marc excellent information about a real chicken teriyaki… the golden result is pure bliss, love all the vast culinary world of the Japanese cuisine :)

    Cheers,

    Gera

  • http://www.sweetsfoods.com/ Gera @ SweetsFoods

    Marc excellent information about a real chicken teriyaki… the golden result is pure bliss, love all the vast culinary world of the Japanese cuisine :)

    Cheers,

    Gera

  • http://www.hollyhadsellentertaining.com/holly_hadsell_el_hajji/2009/07/gazpacho-bar-a-fun-summer-entertaining-idea-and-contest.html Holly

    Whats the difference between yakitori and teriyaki? Do you have a favorite brand of soy? For teriyaki I like the brand with the swan on it.

    • marc

      Hi Holly, yakitori, means “grilled bird” and usually refers to any piece of the chicken skewered and grilled. It can be basted with teriyaki sauce or just salted.

  • http://www.hollyhadsellentertaining.com/holly_hadsell_el_hajji/2009/07/gazpacho-bar-a-fun-summer-entertaining-idea-and-contest.html Holly

    Whats the difference between yakitori and teriyaki? Do you have a favorite brand of soy? For teriyaki I like the brand with the swan on it.

    • marc

      Hi Holly, yakitori, means “grilled bird” and usually refers to any piece of the chicken skewered and grilled. It can be basted with teriyaki sauce or just salted.

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com/ katiek @kitchensidecar

    souful. I love how you brined the meat. I LOVE brining. does a poultry splendiforous!

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com katiek @kitchensidecar

    souful. I love how you brined the meat. I LOVE brining. does a poultry splendiforous!

  • http://www.thedairyshow.com/ Michael

    Thanks for this recipe Mark. I love chicken teriyaki but haven’t made it or had it in a very very very long time. I always used the Sushi Chef brand sauce, which I think is pretty authentic, but it so easy to make, looks like now I can just do it myself.
    In Japan is it also common to use proteins other than chicken, like beef, fish, etc with teriyaki sauce?

    • marc

      Yep, it’s found on beef and fish there as well. With fish it’s generally used with fattier fish like yellowtail or mackerel. It also changes names sometimes. For instance yaki tori (grilled bird) is essentially chicken teriyaki on skewers. Kabayaki is another name for teriyaki sauce when it’s used on seafood like eel. Confused yet?

  • http://www.thedairyshow.com Michael

    Thanks for this recipe Mark. I love chicken teriyaki but haven’t made it or had it in a very very very long time. I always used the Sushi Chef brand sauce, which I think is pretty authentic, but it so easy to make, looks like now I can just do it myself.
    In Japan is it also common to use proteins other than chicken, like beef, fish, etc with teriyaki sauce?

    • marc

      Yep, it’s found on beef and fish there as well. With fish it’s generally used with fattier fish like yellowtail or mackerel. It also changes names sometimes. For instance yaki tori (grilled bird) is essentially chicken teriyaki on skewers. Kabayaki is another name for teriyaki sauce when it’s used on seafood like eel. Confused yet?

  • http://duodishes.com/ The Duo Dishes

    Guess we’ve been doing too much with our teriyaki marinades. :) We’ll have to simplify it next time.

  • http://duodishes.com The Duo Dishes

    Guess we’ve been doing too much with our teriyaki marinades. :) We’ll have to simplify it next time.

  • http://www.phamfatale.com/ Jackie at PhamFatale.com

    Amazing food photography. Nice contrast of color with the green onions. I love making teriyaki chicken using chicken drumsticks :P

  • http://www.phamfatale.com/ Jackie at PhamFatale.com

    Amazing food photography. Nice contrast of color with the green onions. I love making teriyaki chicken using chicken drumsticks :P

  • http://www.weareneverfull.com/ we are never full

    i love this post. it’s one of the most familiar Asian meals to americans yet it gets f-ed up so often. and why? it’s salty and sweet and only contains a few ingredients! realistically, there’s absolutely no reason on earth why people should not make their own teriyaki sauce every time. just buy the ingredients, none of them really spoil, and just make it in a bowl! i’m definitely using this – i haven’t had it in so long. great post, marc!

    also, what do you think about using sake or sherry w/ some sugar as a mirin substitute. i know it’s not legit, but i think the only thing people may not have to make teriyaki is the mirin. just askin’!

    • marc

      Not my most creative post, but I’m glad you found it useful:-)

      As for the substitution, sugar + sake would be ideal as that’s essentially what mirin is, but sherry (or maybe even port) would do in a pinch.

  • http://www.weareneverfull.com we are never full

    i love this post. it’s one of the most familiar Asian meals to americans yet it gets f-ed up so often. and why? it’s salty and sweet and only contains a few ingredients! realistically, there’s absolutely no reason on earth why people should not make their own teriyaki sauce every time. just buy the ingredients, none of them really spoil, and just make it in a bowl! i’m definitely using this – i haven’t had it in so long. great post, marc!

    also, what do you think about using sake or sherry w/ some sugar as a mirin substitute. i know it’s not legit, but i think the only thing people may not have to make teriyaki is the mirin. just askin’!

    • marc

      Not my most creative post, but I’m glad you found it useful:-)

      As for the substitution, sugar + sake would be ideal as that’s essentially what mirin is, but sherry (or maybe even port) would do in a pinch.

  • piercival

    Marc,

    The more I cook the more I find greatness in simplicity and using quality ingredients. This dish looks visually stunning and I’ve cooked enough of your dishes to feel very confident that it will be amazing.

    Do you think it would be possible to add a bit of ginger juice without compromising the teri too much? Or do you have a recommendation for how to infuse the taste of ginger in a better way, without destroying the harmony?

    I will prepare next without ginger but it’s really one of my favorite flavors in the world.

    • marc

      You could put some fresh grated ginger on top after it’s grilled, that should really bring out the ginger flavor without effecting the shine of the sauce.

      That said, my goal here wasn’t to be a teriyaki dictator. Food is always evolving as it moves from place to place and it’s this evolution that makes food interesting. Otherwise we’d all be eating the same thing.

      I just find that sometimes a dish has gone through so many permutations that people loose sight of the original. It’s not a bad thing, but I’m always curious about where the food we eat comes from. I just thought I’d share a more traditional teriyaki as a reminder of this dishes origins.

      Please don’t let this post stop you from making chicken teriyaki your way:-)

  • piercival

    Marc,

    The more I cook the more I find greatness in simplicity and using quality ingredients. This dish looks visually stunning and I’ve cooked enough of your dishes to feel very confident that it will be amazing.

    Do you think it would be possible to add a bit of ginger juice without compromising the teri too much? Or do you have a recommendation for how to infuse the taste of ginger in a better way, without destroying the harmony?

    I will prepare next without ginger but it’s really one of my favorite flavors in the world.

    • marc

      You could put some fresh grated ginger on top after it’s grilled, that should really bring out the ginger flavor without effecting the shine of the sauce.

      That said, my goal here wasn’t to be a teriyaki dictator. Food is always evolving as it moves from place to place and it’s this evolution that makes food interesting. Otherwise we’d all be eating the same thing.

      I just find that sometimes a dish has gone through so many permutations that people loose sight of the original. It’s not a bad thing, but I’m always curious about where the food we eat comes from. I just thought I’d share a more traditional teriyaki as a reminder of this dishes origins.

      Please don’t let this post stop you from making chicken teriyaki your way:-)

  • http://helene-lacuisine.blogspot.com/ Hélène

    Marc I love that you take simple ingredients and make stunning dishes. Looks delicious.

  • http://helene-lacuisine.blogspot.com/ Hélène

    Marc I love that you take simple ingredients and make stunning dishes. Looks delicious.

  • http://www.whiskblog.com/ Shari

    I love how easy this sounds, but so flavorful!

  • http://www.whiskblog.com/ Shari

    I love how easy this sounds, but so flavorful!

  • The Little Teochew

    Yum, I love Teriyaki anything. Love your pics!

  • http://thelittleteochew@blogspot.com The Little Teochew

    Yum, I love Teriyaki anything. Love your pics!

  • http://noobcook.com/ noobcook

    Your teriyaki chicken looks amazing. Certainly much better than most of the teriyaki I had outside =)

  • http://noobcook.com noobcook

    Your teriyaki chicken looks amazing. Certainly much better than most of the teriyaki I had outside =)

  • http://www.flanboyanteats.com/ Bren

    thanks for the quick and simple history and equation to teriyaki! love it.

  • http://www.flanboyanteats.com Bren

    thanks for the quick and simple history and equation to teriyaki! love it.

  • http://lacasserolecarree.blogspot.com/ Vibi

    The pics are amazing and the dish is jus as equally tempting! I’m keeping that one in my “to do” list, for sure.
    Thanks for sharing.

  • http://lacasserolecarree.blogspot.com Vibi

    The pics are amazing and the dish is jus as equally tempting! I’m keeping that one in my “to do” list, for sure.
    Thanks for sharing.

  • http://www.gourmetgirlmagazine.com/ Elaine – The Gourmet Girl

    I especially enjoyed the little history lesson in the beginning. Nice and simple. Thanks for posting!

  • http://www.gourmetgirlmagazine.com Elaine – The Gourmet Girl

    I especially enjoyed the little history lesson in the beginning. Nice and simple. Thanks for posting!

  • http://www.antoniotahhan.com/blog Tony

    your Japanese tweet is what led me here – umami!
    I also liked your clarification on different types of teriyaki sauce. great shots!

  • http://www.antoniotahhan.com/blog Tony

    your Japanese tweet is what led me here – umami!
    I also liked your clarification on different types of teriyaki sauce. great shots!

  • http://www.veggiebelly.com/ veggiebelly

    thanks so much for the sauce recipe! this looks both delicious and easy!

  • http://www.veggiebelly.com veggiebelly

    thanks so much for the sauce recipe! this looks both delicious and easy!

  • http://www.fotoeragu.blogspot.com/ chiara.u

    I simply adore chicken teriyaki! I don’t know if here in Italy I eat the real chicken teriyaki… but now I can thanks to your recipe :)) I’ve even found mirin in that heavenly market in Annecy!!! thanks a lot Marc :)

  • http://www.fotoeragu.blogspot.com chiara.u

    I simply adore chicken teriyaki! I don’t know if here in Italy I eat the real chicken teriyaki… but now I can thanks to your recipe :)) I’ve even found mirin in that heavenly market in Annecy!!! thanks a lot Marc :)

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com Pigpigscorner

    Sounds really simple! Can’t wait to try this out!

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com/ Pigpigscorner

    Sounds really simple! Can’t wait to try this out!

  • http://onlinepastrychef.wordpress.com/ Jenni

    I have learned a new thing–thanks for the definition of “teriyaki,” Marc. Never knew what it meant. Also love your template for it. I’m a fan of “equal parts of…” Makes it easy to remember!

  • http://onlinepastrychef.wordpress.com/ Jenni

    I have learned a new thing–thanks for the definition of “teriyaki,” Marc. Never knew what it meant. Also love your template for it. I’m a fan of “equal parts of…” Makes it easy to remember!

  • http://www.sevenspoons.net/ tara

    I really must learn not to look at your site first thing in the morning; the photographs are so mouthwatering that I’m not jonesing for dinner. You’ve captured the lacquer of the glaze beautifully. Teriyaki is always such a crowd-pleaser, especially with children. Looking forward to trying your version.

  • http://www.sevenspoons.net tara

    I really must learn not to look at your site first thing in the morning; the photographs are so mouthwatering that I’m not jonesing for dinner. You’ve captured the lacquer of the glaze beautifully. Teriyaki is always such a crowd-pleaser, especially with children. Looking forward to trying your version.

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com/ Manggy

    One of my all-time favorites, Marc. I suppose this is payback for me posting the lemon chicken ;) I’ve always loved the grilled version– the fried and coated version I’ve also seen is a little too heavy for me. Thanks for the recipe– I went to Fujimart a while back and got the basics! Too bad it’s raining too hard to grill outdoors, though :(

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com Manggy

    One of my all-time favorites, Marc. I suppose this is payback for me posting the lemon chicken ;) I’ve always loved the grilled version– the fried and coated version I’ve also seen is a little too heavy for me. Thanks for the recipe– I went to Fujimart a while back and got the basics! Too bad it’s raining too hard to grill outdoors, though :(

  • http://chewonthatblog.com/ Hillary

    This is the best looking chicken teriyaki I’ve seen! Thanks for posting!

  • http://chewonthatblog.com Hillary

    This is the best looking chicken teriyaki I’ve seen! Thanks for posting!

  • http://www.bellaeats.com/ Andrea [bellaeats]

    Marc, This dish looks divine! Your photos are very, very lovely.

    Thanks for stopping by my blog, I feel lucky to have discovered yours!

  • http://www.bellaeats.com Andrea [bellaeats]

    Marc, This dish looks divine! Your photos are very, very lovely.

    Thanks for stopping by my blog, I feel lucky to have discovered yours!

  • http://thesplitpea.blogspot.com/ Eralda

    I have a love-hate relationship with teriyaki sauce. there are times when it’s delicious and other times it’s bad. I love the idea of making your own teriyaki. And I am so happy you shared a recipe for it. This is perfect! Beautiful photographs, too.

  • http://thesplitpea.blogspot.com Eralda

    I have a love-hate relationship with teriyaki sauce. there are times when it’s delicious and other times it’s bad. I love the idea of making your own teriyaki. And I am so happy you shared a recipe for it. This is perfect! Beautiful photographs, too.

  • http://itsnotyouitsbrie.com/ It’s Not You, It’s Brie

    Thank you for sharing a recipe for teriyaki chicken without sugar or cornsyrup. Does Japanese cuisine ever suggest marinating meats in cornstarch to produce a softer flesh before cooking?

    • http://norecipes.com/ Marc @ NoRecipes

      Hi Brie, I wasn’t aware of the tenderizing effects of cornstarch, but there are some recipes such as kara-age (japanese fried chicken) that including cornstarch, but this is used more as a coating so it fries up crisp on the outside. I’ve not heard of using cornstarch in chicken teriyaki.

  • http://itsnotyouitsbrie.com It’s Not You, It’s Brie

    Thank you for sharing a recipe for teriyaki chicken without sugar or cornsyrup. Does Japanese cuisine ever suggest marinating meats in cornstarch to produce a softer flesh before cooking?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc @ NoRecipes

      Hi Brie, I wasn’t aware of the tenderizing effects of cornstarch, but there are some recipes such as kara-age (japanese fried chicken) that including cornstarch, but this is used more as a coating so it fries up crisp on the outside. I’ve not heard of using cornstarch in chicken teriyaki.

  • http://www.funkynomadeats.wordpress.com/ Adriana

    Hi there,
    I just discovered your blog and am loving it! :)

  • http://www.funkynomadeats.wordpress.com Adriana

    Hi there,
    I just discovered your blog and am loving it! :)

  • piercival

    Made this last night on the Q and as expected, it delivered the goods. It was a case of less is more; way less complicated and yet the flavors were deep and balanced.

    I often seem to discover the elemental nature of a dish when Marc explains it’s essence -which is way cool- and always the great payoff when it hits the plates. Simple, elegant, sublime. Extraordinary dish!

    I’m hoping Marc will explore a dish made with fresh Unagi one of these days….. [hint, hint].

  • piercival

    Made this last night on the Q and as expected, it delivered the goods. It was a case of less is more; way less complicated and yet the flavors were deep and balanced.

    I often seem to discover the elemental nature of a dish when Marc explains it’s essence -which is way cool- and always the great payoff when it hits the plates. Simple, elegant, sublime. Extraordinary dish!

    I’m hoping Marc will explore a dish made with fresh Unagi one of these days….. [hint, hint].

  • http://www.tasteslikehome.org/ Cynthia

    Marc, thank you so very much for this post! Now I can taste some proper teriyaki chicken!

  • http://www.tasteslikehome.org Cynthia

    Marc, thank you so very much for this post! Now I can taste some proper teriyaki chicken!

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  • http://rasamalaysia.com/ Rasa Malaysia

    I thought I left you a message but I guess not. Well, your chicken teriyaki looks so authentic and good it looks exactly like the ones served at Matsuhisa Beverly Hills, which they sell for $20 even for lunch special! :P

  • http://rasamalaysia.com Rasa Malaysia

    I thought I left you a message but I guess not. Well, your chicken teriyaki looks so authentic and good it looks exactly like the ones served at Matsuhisa Beverly Hills, which they sell for $20 even for lunch special! :P

  • http://www.bigboldbeautifulfood.blogspot.com/ Ninette

    Your teriyaki looks fab. So much bad teriyaki out there. Did you know I gave you a blog award? http://bigboldbeautifulfood.blogspot.com/2009/07/kreativ-blogger-award-thank-you-zurin.html

  • http://www.bigboldbeautifulfood.blogspot.com Ninette

    Your teriyaki looks fab. So much bad teriyaki out there. Did you know I gave you a blog award? http://bigboldbeautifulfood.blogspot.com/2009/07/kreativ-blogger-award-thank-you-zurin.html

  • http://www.bellalimento.com/ Paula – bell’alimento

    This looks amazing. Your photography is stunning! I can’t wait to try this authentic dish :)

  • http://www.bellalimento.com Paula – bell’alimento

    This looks amazing. Your photography is stunning! I can’t wait to try this authentic dish :)

  • Poh Lin

    Hi Marc,

    Just wandered in after a recommendation from a friend. Your photos look amazing and you make the recipes seem so easy. I think I will be in for a treat when I look through your previous posts.

    Btw, do you think I can substitute sake with Chinese cooking wine (or Shao Hsing wine)?

    If not, what type of sake should I get? A bit lost when it comes to sake.

    Thanks.

    • marc

      Hi Poh Lin, thanks for your comment. You could definitely substitute Chinese cooking wine for the sake. Shao Hsing has a fairly distinct flavour, so Mijiu should work better.

      If you do decide to use sake, it doesn’t really matter what kind (I use a cheap bottle for cooking). Good luck:-)

  • Poh Lin

    Hi Marc,

    Just wandered in after a recommendation from a friend. Your photos look amazing and you make the recipes seem so easy. I think I will be in for a treat when I look through your previous posts.

    Btw, do you think I can substitute sake with Chinese cooking wine (or Shao Hsing wine)?

    If not, what type of sake should I get? A bit lost when it comes to sake.

    Thanks.

    • marc

      Hi Poh Lin, thanks for your comment. You could definitely substitute Chinese cooking wine for the sake. Shao Hsing has a fairly distinct flavour, so Mijiu should work better.

      If you do decide to use sake, it doesn’t really matter what kind (I use a cheap bottle for cooking). Good luck:-)

  • http://mybflikesitsoimbg.blogspot.com/ Peggy

    Tried this recipe out last night on the grill… the results were great! Never knew making Teriyaki sauce was so easy! Thanks!

  • http://mybflikesitsoimbg.blogspot.com Peggy

    Tried this recipe out last night on the grill… the results were great! Never knew making Teriyaki sauce was so easy! Thanks!

  • http://deliciousasianfood.com/ pablopabla

    Hi Marc! How are you doing? :D

    This is one of my most oft-ordered dish when I dine in a Japanese restaurant. You made it so simple :D

  • http://deliciousasianfood.com pablopabla

    Hi Marc! How are you doing? :D

    This is one of my most oft-ordered dish when I dine in a Japanese restaurant. You made it so simple :D

  • http://cajunchefryan.rymocs.com/blog2/ Cajun Chef Ryan

    Now I want some of that right about now, and I just finished lunch too!

  • http://cajunchefryan.rymocs.com/blog2/ Cajun Chef Ryan

    Now I want some of that right about now, and I just finished lunch too!

  • http://www.thehungrymouse.com/ Jessie

    *swoon*

    This looks so good. :D

    +Jessie

  • http://www.thehungrymouse.com Jessie

    *swoon*

    This looks so good. :D

    +Jessie

  • Sylvia

    tried the teriyaki over the weekend and absolutely loved it. very easy to prepare and tasted fantastic. thank you so much for the post.

  • Sylvia

    tried the teriyaki over the weekend and absolutely loved it. very easy to prepare and tasted fantastic. thank you so much for the post.

  • Adelina

    I’ve read and heard so much about using mirin to cook/ marinade/ to make sauce, etc. but your recipe Does give me a proper reason to use it, finally!

    Your post looks so good I am getting extremely hungry!!!

    Thanks for posting and for sharing!

  • Adelina

    I’ve read and heard so much about using mirin to cook/ marinade/ to make sauce, etc. but your recipe Does give me a proper reason to use it, finally!

    Your post looks so good I am getting extremely hungry!!!

    Thanks for posting and for sharing!

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  • Cara

    Can you leave out the sake? Or substitute it with something non-alcoholic?

  • Cara

    Can you leave out the sake? Or substitute it with something non-alcoholic?

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  • John

    Hi Marc,

    Your recipe is so simple. i like it. :) Good job!

    Just a question though, what could be a good replacement for the sake in making the teriyaki sauce?

    thanks!

  • John

    Hi Marc,

    Your recipe is so simple. i like it. :) Good job!

    Just a question though, what could be a good replacement for the sake in making the teriyaki sauce?

    thanks!

  • Ryuuku

    You could use dry sherry instead of sake, or just increase the Mirin and decrease the sugar (mirin is a type of sake which is sweeter than normal sake). Or you could just leave it out. I’ve seen teriyake recipes that just use equal parts soy sauce and mirin. I guess you’ll have to experiment to find a version you like.

  • Ryuuku

    You could use dry sherry instead of sake, or just increase the Mirin and decrease the sugar (mirin is a type of sake which is sweeter than normal sake). Or you could just leave it out. I’ve seen teriyake recipes that just use equal parts soy sauce and mirin. I guess you’ll have to experiment to find a version you like.

  • CookInTraining

    Marc, Thanks for your incredible website. My husband is half-Japanese and I've always struggled to match the cooking skills of his mother (who was born in Osaka)! You've simplified in a way that a girl who was raised on fast-food can even understand. My biggest challenge still is my allergy to seafood. I'll just have to work around it! Thanks again!

  • mahia

    Is there a way of making teriyaki sauce without any alcohol??

  • norecipes

    Well, technically there is no alcohol in this since it is cooked (so
    the alcohol evaporates), but if you're asking if you can make it with
    other ingredients, you can just replace the mirin with 2 parts water
    and 1 part sugar.

  • zernike

    I am so grateful to find a recipe for thick teriyaki sauce without cornstarch! Tastes fantastic too!

  • mylene mendoza

    im not so into this teriyaki chicken recipe,in fact i didnt attempt to try it because i thought thats its just like adobo,but……just 2 days ago,when my daughter had a graduation party,and they served this meal-i said omg this is good,really good.and im planning to include this recepi this week.

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  • Michelle

    why do you put the chicken in an airtight bag (v. just a bowl)? just wondering because I don't like using ziplock bags . . .

  • norecipes

    You could use a bowl too, but you'll need to stir the chicken a couple
    times while it's marinating to ensure it marinates evenly. By pushing
    the air out of the bag, you surround every piece of meat with the
    marinade (even if there's only a small amount). You could also just
    increase the amount of marinade so all the chicken is completely
    submerged in the bowl.

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  • Aasma_khani

    Can I please get some replacement for mirin and sake because I could not find them in my local market in Pakistan : )

  • norecipes

    There really isn't a good non-alcoholic replacement for sake and
    mirin. Mirin is a sweet rice wine, so you can try using a mixture of sugar and
    water (1 part sugar to 2 parts water). As for the sake, you could replace it
    with water. You could also try using some kind of relatively neutral fruit
    juice (like apple juice or grape juice) in place of the mirin. Hope that
    helps!

  • http://globetrotterdiaries.com/ Valerie

    Love the idea of using the leftovers for oyako donburi. That makes two of my all-time favorite dishes in one shot!

  • Claire

    This looks fantastic. But is this expensive?

  • Spikethebike

    How do you suppose some kecap manis would work in this dish? I marinated a whole chicken overnight that will be going in the barby soon, and so far my glaze has some honey, kecap manis, chinese cooking wine(sangchew?), dry sherry that has been used to store ginger root, and sake.

    • annoymous

      It would be horrible.

  • Anonymous

    That sounds like a great idea! Cooking is all about experimenting with
    flavours that work for you:-)

  • Spikethebike

    Oh ya, and a little sweet chili sauce, too!

  • Spikethebike

    It turned out really well! Paired with some jasmine rice cooked with some rice wine vinegar and sesame oil in the cooking water.

  • http://twitter.com/caus2000 Calian

    My daughter likes Teriyaki, so she always orders it whenever visiting a Japanese restaurant. Your recipe is simple but authentic! Sake is one I have missed. OK! I will try your secret recipe next time.

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  • John

    I love the recipe, but I’m running into a bit of a problem. Marinating the chicken and brushing a coat of teriyaki sauce while the chicken is on the grill is causing the sugar to burn and create black grill marks while the inside of the chicken is not cooked. I think the sugar is burning long before the chicken is cooked through.

    Any suggestions?

    • Anonymous

      Hi John, it’s possible your grill is too hot. If you are using charcoal,
      just push them over to one side to create a hot side and a cool side. If
      you’re using gas, try turning down the temp. Also, the glaze goes on at the
      very end, if you put it on any earlier it will burn.

      • leah

        Good afternoon Mr.Marc. Im a filipina and I dont know how to cook japanese menu.Can you send some easy recipe to my email.Thanks you and God Bless you sir.More Power.

  • http://www.erikorganic.com/dining-room/dining-room-table.shtml dining tables

    It has been a long time since I made some teriyaki! Thanks for the reminder. Your teriyaki really look so delicious.

  • Skivvey

    I have a recipe for what I “thought” was an authentic teriyaki sauce, but I just realized after reading this article that I was putting in WAY too many ingredients. I usually make a half gallon of my old sauce at a time and use half and give half to friends and family who beg for it. However, next time I make teriyaki sauce I am making this recipe. I have a feeling it will not take half the time and will probably taste 10X’s better!

    Thanks so much for the culinary education! ;)

  • purpleaddict

    This might sound stupid but can this be fried rather than grilled?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Sure, it’s not quite the same, but many home cooks in Japan will pan
      fry it and then baste it with the glaze. I don’t have a grill, so I
      just broil it.

      On Wednesday, April 13, 2011, Disqus

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  • Reincloudt

    I dare say this is the best chicken teriyaki recipe on the net!

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  • Allyson Dangelo

    Totally authentic!  Awesome!

  • Medyogwapo

    i love the japanese food
     

  • Sixseto

    Hi!
    Thanks so much for this fabulous recipe! Our family loves the real thing–authenticity is our priority. And your recipe looks great!

    Can you let us know how long to one should “boil” the sauce. I like it as thick as you can get it but am afraid of burning it. Approximate how many minutes after the liquids starts to softly boil? THANKS so much! Can’t wait to try it!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      This sauce will not get super thick, it’s not supposed to be as thick
      as most bottled teriyaki sauces. The idea is to thicken it just enough
      to make it stick to the meat. If you want it thick, you can add
      cornstarch to the mixture and it will thicken up.

  • Ariella

    hi

  • poo

    it was gross.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Sorry to hear you didn’t enjoy it. Perhaps if you tell me a bit more about
      what you thought went wrong, I can help you change it so it better suites
      your tastes.

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  • Melanie Sawyer

    This was a really nice tasting Teriyaki recipe. Made the recipe exactly as stated. Thanks for a good recipe.

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  • Susique

    I’m new to Asian cooking and have what is probably a stupid question.  Is there a difference between “Japanese soy sauce” and “dark soy sauce”?  Also, should I buy these at an Asian market or can I find good ones at a “regular” grocery.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      No worries. You should be able to find Japanese soy sauce at almost any grocery store in the US. Japanese soy sauce is different from Chinese dark soy sauce in that it has a much lighter color and flavor. But within Japanese soy sauce, there are light and dark variations. For this recipe you just want regular Japanese soy sauce. The most common brand is Kikkoman.

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  • andy

    What kind of rice should I use

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It’s up to you, but in Japan, we use short grain rice often labelled “sushi rice” in the US.

  • http://themonkeykitchen.blogspot.com/ Soha Ellaithy

    Hi Marc,
    We don’t drink or use alcohol so i was wondering if there are any substitutes to mirin and sake that I can use without compromising the recipe too much

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      You could replace it with water and sugar. Obviously not the same, but it’s probably the best substitute.

  • chelle

    I found teriyaki sauce in the grocery, can I use that instead?

  • Jonno_001

    No Chelle, you cannot use the teriyaki sauce you found in the grocery instead! Are you some kind of idiot? Who do you think you are?

  • Jacqui

    We made this on Saturday and it was just delicious.  Very authentic, very very easy receipe, and tasted delicious.  Will be a regular to our dinner table. Thank you for sharing

  • http://www.miniclip.fm Miniclip

    This was a really nice tasting Teriyaki recipe. Made the recipe exactly as stated. Thanks for a good recipe.

  • Amanda

    I don’t have sake, can I use chinese cooking wine instead?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It will change the flavor quite a bit, but it will work.

  • Lisa

    Made this tonight – super simple and tastier than my mom’s! 

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  • Holly

    Made this for lunch today with steamed vegetables. My family loved it. Did the recipe exact except we did breast instead of thighs. This will be a remake for sure! IT was also very easy to make

  • Kikicakes

    I know you talked about fruit purées clouding the taste, but I was told once by a Shogun’s chef that their recipe tastes different than any other because they cube fruits (I know he said one was a type of melon- maybe cantelope?) and let them marinade for about 3 days with the other ingredients until the fruit is almost marinaded away. And that’s why theirs is so sweet.

    And the other places I’ve been just aren’t sweet enough for me. Do you think I’ve just gotten used to a sweeter taste? Could I make your recipe with more honey?

    (ps- store bought ones are just awful!!!)

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Adding fruit is not part of a traditional teriyaki recipe. That said, there’s nothing wrong with breaking with tradition. As long as you don’t puree the fruit, and you remove it from the sauce before cooking, it should still be clear and shiny, so I say go for it! As for making it sweeter, more honey or sugar should do the trick.

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  • Lara

    Could you elaborate on how long you cook the chicken? Grill vs. broiler. Thanks!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      To use a grill instead of a broiler, just reverse the cooking order (i.e. cook the skin side up first, then flip and cook the skin side down).

  • Cynthiamejia_roma

    What is mirin? Can I use any white wine instead of sake?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Mirin is sweet Japanese rice wine. You can substitute extra sake and extra sugar for the mirin, but substituting white wine for sake will change the taste substantially.

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  • Luzaki

    i learn about teriyaki sauces i know it sweet not only just that the pefect thing is that by adding the food is being grill it smell good but but if we boil the salmon fish and put teriyaki  sauces i thing it will be fantastic ko 

  • Jackr

    Looks and sounds delicious! 

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/7LQOYL4FJF4ZQVX5YUX5AXWXSM Carla

    I’m gonna try it! The two things I miss more from Japan is teriyaki chicken and yakiniku.
    Your blog is absolutely perfect… I’m trying to begin in food photography too :)

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  • Kinako

    I made it as described but I added snow peas, carrots and parsnip when broiling.  I basted the veg with the marinade to begin and clazed them after with the teriyaki sauce before putting it all over rice.  Delish!  Super recipe!!

  • Anees4

    this is hard looking for the recipe

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  • Anon

    thank god I found this, I was searching for about 3 hours all over the recipe. Thank you so much.

  • Tucancantu247

    how many people does this serve?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It depends on how many chicken thighs you use and how hungry the people are. If you make 6 medium chicken thighs you should figure 1.5-2 thighs per person, so that would be 3-4 people. If you make 4, it would feed 2 people. 

      • tucancantu247

        Thank you so much my family loved this recipe! sorry I’m so late on the reply ,but this recipe was a keeper!

  • Rachael

    can you bake the chicken instead?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      You can bake the chicken, but the lower temperature won’t get you the same results. If you don’t have a broil setting on your oven, you could also pan-fry it in a hot skillet with some oil.

  • Eric

    Just made this according to your recipe (but using dark brown sugar dissolved in water in place of maltose or honey, neither of which were on hand). Really delicious!

  • sla guna

    Hi Marc, I just found your site b/c I was looking for a no-fail authentic chicken and beef teriyaki recipe for my dinner tomorrow. Can I just say, your site is a goldmine! I can’t wait to try out more recipes! That being said, could you also use the same brine and glaze recipe on beef? And what cut of beef would you recommend for beef teriyaki? Thank you so much! I look forward to hearing from you!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Thanks! You could definitely use it with beef too. As for the cut, I’d recommend something tender with a lot of fat, hangar steak would probably be my #1 choice for a good balance of fat, flavor and price.

      • sla guna

        Marc your recipes were a hit! What a difference real sake makes as well. I tried the recipe on both chicken and beef and both were well received. I did end up adding a bit of garlic and ginger to the beef batch and made them as teriyaki kabobs on the grill. All in all, great simple but tasty recipe! Can’t wait to try out your others and hopefully learn how to cook w/o a recipe. :) 

        Sidenote– do you have any video clips when you were on “Chopped” or “Grill It w/BF?” I can’t find a clip anywhere and would love to see you in action!

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          The Bobby Flay episode isn’t online anywhere, but I found the Chopped episode on youtube. Just do a search for “Thyme Flies Chopped” on youtube and it should come up.

  • saeko

    Dear Marc,
    My first SUCCESSFUL attempt at teriyaki…domo arigato gozaimashita. I am a third generation Japanese American and you are helping to bridge the gap. I can’t wait to try the next recipe….Sincerely, thank you. Saeko

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    this is the type of teriyaki chicken that is best for Asian taste… I tried this cooking in my resort in Mindoro Bali Beach Garden Resort and my guests like this!!! thumbs up !!Thank you

  • Mike Gargano

    Hi, I was wondering how long you can marinate for, possible to leave over night?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Overnight would be be fine, it just means more flavor will soak into the meat.

  • Jamie

    I tried this for the 2nd time tonight, still can’t quite get the sauce right it always turns out too runny. How can I make it so that the sauce is thicker or more glossy as you would say??

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It’s not going to get as thick as the bottled sauces, but you should still be able to get it thick enough to coat your chicken. I know I said saucepan in the recipe, but try doing it in a fry pan or something with more surface area so you burn off the liquid faster. I included a time progression of what the sauce should look like in this post on PBS: http://www.pbs.org/food/fresh-tastes/salmon-teriyaki/

  • vrouwtje

    what is sake?

  • Recipe tried

    We just had this for dinner and it was a big hIt. This is the second recipe I’ve tried of yours. The first was the nikumon which are the best ever I’ve tried. I’ve made it a bunch of times and will make this one regularly too. I never liked teriyaki chicken either until now. This is not too sweet like at most restaurants.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Thanks! Glad you liked it:-)

  • ching

    hi! what’s the best substitute for sake?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      There is no substitute that will emulate the flavor of rice wine (sake). You can make the sauce with water, but it will taste like sweet soysauce. Using grape based wines won’t work well either because they are acidic. If you’ve searched all over and really can’t find sake, you could use a 1 to 4 mixture of sherry and water, but it will taste different.

  • fe

    can i use salmon for this teriyaki sauce?

  • Stacy

    wat is siren

  • Stacy

    i mean mirin

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It’s a sweet cooking wine made from rice. You can substitute extra sake and sugar to replace it.

  • Danica

    any suggestions on what vegetables I could serve on the side of this?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It will go with whatever you have. Spinach, swiss chard, snap peas, sugar peas, green beans, zucchini and summer squash are all good choices.

  • Kara

    How do I pan fry this? Don’t have a grill/broiler:( And will pan frying this make the chicken less tasty and dry?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I’m actually working on a pan-fried version of this recipe, so stay tuned. In the mean-time if you want to try it out, check out my beef teriyaki recipe (http://norecipes.com/blog/beef-teriyaki-recipe/) for the process. The only difference with chicken is that it takes longer to cook through, so you’ll need to cover the pan with a lid to steam the chicken for a bit before adding the sauce ingredients.

    • Ernest

      I always do mine in a skillet. Brown the chicken, then cut it into strips while I reduce the sauce in the same skillet. Then place the chicken strips back to the skillet with the sauce to finish cooking it.
      Takes a few minutes longer but it works just fine.

  • Skye

    Does this go well with bean sprouts?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I honestly can’t think of a vegetable this wouldn’t work with. Bean sprouts should be great!

  • Victoria

    Love your teriyaki sauce recipe – so simple and great tasting. This will be my go to recipe from now on. Thanks!

  • Marga

    Hello! How should I grill this on a stove top grill? Please elaborate. Thank you!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      By stove top grill, do you mean a griddle or something like a Japanese stove top grill (with a ceramic heat diffuser and mesh)?

  • Tom

    How close do you have the chicken to the broiler?
    Thanks

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      With the oven rack in the upper middle position.

  • MikeG

    The recipe looks fantastic and I’m eager to try it. I have found Sake and Rice wine, but the label doesn’t mention Mirin. Should I add sugar to the Rice wine?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Yea, you could make a substitute for mirin by using 1 cup sake to 1/3 cup sugar.

      -Marc

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    this is a delicious recipe… i served it with steamed cabbage and broccoli and rice.

  • http://www.facebook.com/joey.cruz.984 Joey Cruz

    is sake the same as the vinegar/seasoning(?) you put in sushi? hmmm…the bottle i got had a photo of sushi :| now i’m not so sure if the seller gave me the correct bottle, given that i don’t understand japanese text. :(

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Rice wine vinegar (or sometimes just rice vinegar) is made from rice wine (sake). Just like regular wine vinegar it has undergone the last stage of fermentation and all the alcohol has turned into acetic acid (i.e. it’s become very sour). If you asked for sake and they gave you rice wine vinegar you should take it back as they are not the same thing.

  • Gina

    Hi Marc, I just marinated my chicken, but I used skinless chicken..do you think that will work too? I guess it will be less flavorful…hopefully not too much?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Yep that should be fine, it may be a little dryer, but otherwise it’ll be fine. Healthier too!

  • gina

    would this work with skinless chicken?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Yep it’s a matter of personal preference, the skin keeps the chicken more moist and adds more flavor.

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  • Mib

    We r Muslims and v can’t use sake or mirin or any alcohol what can i use instead

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It’s not going to have the same flavor, but water would probably be the best substitute.

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  • jule

    Wow! I rarely leave comments about recipes I try, but this was amazing! I switched out the thighs for breasts and flattened them all to the same thickness. Had to keep a close eye on them so they won’t dry up. Done in 15 minutes, quicker than the rice. Just goes you show how much you can do with so little! Thanks for the awesome recipe Marc!

  • frgarden

    I thought all soy sauce was japanese, you mention japanese in the brine and dark soy in the sauce. What is the difference and where do I purchase these?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      There are many different kinds of soy sauce with wildly different characteristics. For example, Japanese soy sauce is lighter than Chinese soy sauce with a more delicate flavor, and not as sweet as Indonesian soy sauce. Even within Japanese soy sauce there are many different kinds. Dark is the standard kikkoman brand sold almost anywhere, but there is also light, which has a lighter color and flavor, and white, which is clear and light amber in color. For this recipe you just want the standard Japanese dark soy sauce. As for where to get it I can’t really help you out if you don’t tell me what area you live in.

  • Claudia Smith

    Hi Marc, This looks wonderful and exactly what I was looking for to feed about 25 guests for a barbecue/engagement party. Should I quadruple the recipe, or even times it by five, and if so, is there anything else I should know when making it for a crowd? Thank you!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Claudia, multiplying the recipe shouldn’t be a problem, but if you’re doing it on a barbecue, you’ll want to get the sauce more viscous in a pan (see this post for pics: http://norecipes.com/blog/teriyaki-chicken-recipe/), then grill the chicken skin-side up first, flip and grill skin side down. When the chicken is cooked, take it off the heat and drizzle with the sauce.

      • Claudia Smith

        Thank you! I’m testing it out tonight on my son!! Can’t wait!

  • Shandi

    This has become my go to teriyaki recipe. Its soo easy and delicious! Thank you so much for sharing.

  • Carly

    Marc you’re a genius and I love your recipes!

  • Lana

    Do you have a recommended brand for sake? We have 3 brands around here and I don’t recall the name for them.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      For cooking, it really doesn’t make much of a difference, just make sure you’re using a sake meant for drinking (not for cooking). I use cheap stuff out of a box.

  • Mistey

    What are the ideal sides to be served with the Chicken????

  • Guest

    Boo Yao! I followed your recipe and came out tasting like a PRO did it. Thanks Dr. Matsumoto.

  • LA Bad

    Hi Mark, I’ve tried several of your recipes including the pan and grilled version of this Teriyaki Chicken. Though I love both, I prefer the pan version because, to me, it taste better. The way I know a teriyaki should taste. Is this because of the grated ginger on the pan version that ‘s not on the grilled recipe? Does ginger taste good on grilled foods? Thanks!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It could have to do with the ginger, but it could also have to do with the thickness of the sauce. Try reducing the sauce further on the grilled version so it’s as thick as the pan version. As for the ginger, it would be fine to add some to the marinade (just don’t add it to the sauce or it will cloud the sauce).


      Marc Matsumoto
      http://norecipes.com
      http://wanderingcook.com
      Twitter: @norecipes

  • LA Bad

    Hi Mark, I’ve tried several of your recipes including the pan and grilled version of this Teriyaki Chicken. Though I love both, I prefer the pan version because, to me, it taste better. The way I know a teriyaki should taste. Is this because of the grated ginger on the pan version that ‘s not on the grilled recipe? Does ginger taste good on grilled foods? Thanks!

  • beebeelove

    Hi Marc, I love your recipes, thank you! I have made this for 2 people with yummie success and now I am planning to make this for about 15 people for my 4th of July party using our gas grill. My question is: how high should I set the temp on the grill and about how long will it take to cook using thighs with skin on? Thanks.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi beebeelove, I’m glad to hear you enjoyed it. How high you set the temperature really depends on how much BTU your unit outputs, but I’d start by preheating the grill at medium heat. Put the chicken skin side down first until it has some nice grill marks and then flip and finish by basting with the glaze. If the temperature is too hot, the sugar will burn before the chicken is cooked. Cooking times will vary on the size and temperature of the chicken when it hits the grill, but it should be about 4-8 minutes total. You can cut into the meat to check and see if it’s done.

      • susantao

        Great, thank you so much! Now I just have to start hunting down boneless thighs with skin, I couldn’t find any here yesterday in San Jose. They either had boneless/skinless or bone in…

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          You could just buy the bone-in skin-on variety and debone them yourself. Then use the bones for chicken stock. Otherwise try Mitsuwa, they usually have bone-less skin on thighs specifically for Chicken Teriyaki.

          • susantao

            I ran out of time, so I ended up de-boning 30 thighs, not easy! Just wanted to update you that I grilled them on my gas stove on medium setting and it was the BEST Teri chicken ever!! Thanks again for your recipe and tips, my 4th of July BBQ was a success!

          • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

            Wow, that’s a lot of thighs! Glad to hear it went well!

            Sent from Mailbox for iPhone

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  • oliver weagle

    Hi Marc – GREAT site – and super photography too! Can this be prepared ahead of time – for 8 – 10 people? Howw would one keep the skin crispy?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Oliver, thanks for the note! The skin doesn’t full crisp, just a bit around the edges. Getting the skin crispy would involve a bunch of additional steps of drying the skin and oiling it and it wouldn’t really be chicken teriyaki at that point. Even if you did go through the trouble of fully crisping the skin, it would not stay crisp for a more than a few minutes because the steam rising off the meat would quickly saturate the skin as it cooled. If you’re okay with the skin not being crispy, you could do this ahead of time, but it will lose it’s shiny glaze as the moisture coming off the cooking chicken will water down the glaze. You could reglaze it just before serving by making just the sauce in a pan as described here: http://norecipes.com/blog/teriyaki-chicken-recipe/

  • Jessica

    Hello Mark I love your recipes! But I would really like it if maybe you posted pics of the ingredients you use. Some ingredients I just don’t know what they are. For example Mirin and sake. I would appreciate it Thanks!!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Jessica, that’s a great idea, but in the case of mirin and sake, it probably wouldn’t help much as the labels are in Japanese. Sake is a Japanese wine made from rice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sake), and mirin is a sweet rice wine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirin). I’m not sure where you live, but most supermarkets in California carry both. If you can’t find them at a store near you, you can get them online just head over to Google and do a search.

      • Jessica

        Thanks! I do live in California so I’ll go ahead and look for these!

  • Jessica

    Hi Mark, I have a doubt, What is the difference between Sweet Cooking Rice Seasoning, Sweet Rice Vinegar, and Sweet Cooking Rice Wine?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Mirin is a sweet wine made from rice and koji (a type of mold that converts the starches in rice into sugar), Good quality mirin will only contain these two ingredients and should not have salt, sugar or corn syrup added. Unfortunately it’s difficult to find real mirin in the US. If you have a choice of a couple brands, check the ingredients label and buy the one with the least additives. My guess is that “Sweet Cooking Rice Seasoning” and “Sweet Cooking Rice Wine” are both Mirin, but check the ingredients. As for anything with “vinegar” in the name, it’s rice wine that’s undergone the last stage of fermentation where the alcohol has turned into acetic acid (vinegar). It’s a totally different ingredient and should not be used in place of mirin. Hope that helps!

  • Jessica

    Is this the Mirin you use?

  • Jessica

    Mirin?

  • cyrille

    thanks for this recipe :) i hope my boyfriend will like it because i will cook chiken teriyaki just a goodluck food for lunch for his interview tomorrow :D

  • Luke

    This recipe sounds and looks delicious, but why so complex? For my grilled teri chicken, I rub both sides of the thighs w/ dried ginger pour on a little bit of sesame and safflower oil, alot of black pepper, soy sauce and agave nectar to taste and grill until I feel it’s done

Welcome!

I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques and give you the confidence and inspiration so that you can cook without recipes too!

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