Gomamiso Yosenabe (Sesame Miso Hotpot)

Nabe (pronounced nabeh) is the Japanese word for “pot” and is used to refer to a class of dishes which includes favourites such as shabu shabu and sukiyaki. Yose (pronounced yoseh) means to “put together”, so yosenabe is a dish that’s often cooked in a pot at the table with meat, seafood and veggies put together.

Depending on what region of Japan you’re from, the broth can be made from seafood or meat and can be seasoned with miso, soy sauce or salt. All the regional combinations of items that go into nabes, makes it a very versatile dish that’s eaten all over Japan in winter. This is all just a long way of saying that there’s no right way to make a nabe.

At its core, it’s a simple hearty stew that’s heavy on vegetables and light on meat. Because it’s typically cooked in a giant ceramic or cast iron pot at the table, it’s boiling hot when it reaches your bowl and is a great way to warm up during the cold months.

While I’m no expert on all the regional variations of yosenabe (I doubt anyone could really keep track of all the variations), I’m fairly certain putting tahini into a nabe is pretty uncommon. It’s a weird quirk I have that started with a penchant for putting tahini in packaged ramens to give them a little more oomph. I love it because it gives the soup a white creaminess not unlike the rich pork broth used in tonkotsu ramen. The earthy flavors of are perfect compliments and the rich creaminess provides the stick-to-your-ribs feel without the stick-to-your-ribs calories.

Before you balk at the long list of ingredients, you don’t need everything, just 1 or 2 from each category.

stock
3 C dashi
1/4 C miso
2 Tbs mirin
1 Tbs tahini
1 tsp sugar

veggies group A
Carrots
Daikon
Potatao

meat
Chicken thighs cut into chunks
Pork sliced
Prawns
Fish cut it chunks

veggies group B
Ramps
Green Onions
Yellow Onions
Leek

mushrooms
Shiitake Mushrooms
Enoki Mushrooms
Matsutake Mushrooms
Shimeji Mushrooms

other
Shirataki
Tofu

veggies group C
Napa cabbage
Cabbage
Chrysanthemum
Spinach
Mizuna

In a medium cast iron pot, clay pot, or french oven (like a Le Creuset), add all the ingredients for the stock and whisk to combine. Heat over a table top burner or on the stove until simmering. Add a few items from veggie group A as well as any meat you want to add. After they’ve cooked, add some items from veggies group B, mushrooms, and other. When those are ready, finish by adding some veggies from group C.

Serve with an empty bowl and bowl of rice, keeping a ladle and long chopsticks at the table to pick out the bits each person wants.

It’s also common to finish the meal by adding a bowl of pre-cooked ramen, udon or rice into the left over stock after most of the veggies and meat have been eaten.

  • http://www.buffchickpea.com/ Hayley

    One of my favorite restaurants is a Japanese hot pot, and this reminds me so much of it. Thanks for sharing, everything looks delicious!

  • http://www.buffchickpea.com Hayley

    One of my favorite restaurants is a Japanese hot pot, and this reminds me so much of it. Thanks for sharing, everything looks delicious!

  • http://chefholly.typepad.com/holly_hadsell_el_hajji/ Holly

    Interesting about putting the tahini in. I will try it.

  • http://chefholly.typepad.com/holly_hadsell_el_hajji/ Holly

    Interesting about putting the tahini in. I will try it.

  • http://souvlakiforthesoul.com/ Peter G

    Tahini? Well, this could be our first Japanese/Middle Eastern crossover/fusion with excellent results! The nutiness of the sesames is a perfect companion to this lovely broth Marc. Great thinking.

  • http://souvlakiforthesoul.com Peter G

    Tahini? Well, this could be our first Japanese/Middle Eastern crossover/fusion with excellent results! The nutiness of the sesames is a perfect companion to this lovely broth Marc. Great thinking.

  • http://www.applesandbutter.com/ Jessica

    Sounds so delicious! It was raining here today and we went out to get ramen. I’ve been craving more ever since. This recipe and your great pictures aren’t helping those cravings!

  • http://www.applesandbutter.com Jessica

    Sounds so delicious! It was raining here today and we went out to get ramen. I’ve been craving more ever since. This recipe and your great pictures aren’t helping those cravings!

  • http://elrasbaking.blogspot.com/ Elra

    Perfect, I made something similar sans tahini. This is interesting indeed. Sounds scrumptious.
    Cheers,
    Elra

  • http://elrasbaking.blogspot.com Elra

    Perfect, I made something similar sans tahini. This is interesting indeed. Sounds scrumptious.
    Cheers,
    Elra

  • http://www.rasamalaysia.com/ Rasa Malaysia

    I love this Marc. I should make this really, I bought a new pack of white miso paste. This is truly hearty. :)

  • http://www.rasamalaysia.com Rasa Malaysia

    I love this Marc. I should make this really, I bought a new pack of white miso paste. This is truly hearty. :)

  • http://heartandhearth.blogspot.com/ Ning

    Hotpot is one of the family’s favorite. Healthy and delicious! I have not tried this soup yet. and I just have all the ingredients! :)

  • http://heartandhearth.blogspot.com Ning

    Hotpot is one of the family’s favorite. Healthy and delicious! I have not tried this soup yet. and I just have all the ingredients! :)

  • Ricky

    You can try adding soy milk, and it would become tonyu nabe

    • marc

      I love Tounyu Nabe! So rich and creamy without adding a ton of calories.

  • Ricky

    You can try adding soy milk, and it would become tonyu nabe

    • marc

      I love Tounyu Nabe! So rich and creamy without adding a ton of calories.

  • http://www.foodgal.com/ Carolyn Jung

    On this rainy day, this looks like the perfect meal. And yes, it may take a bit of time to cut up all the ingredients, but the fun part is you let everyone cook for themselves.

  • http://www.foodgal.com Carolyn Jung

    On this rainy day, this looks like the perfect meal. And yes, it may take a bit of time to cut up all the ingredients, but the fun part is you let everyone cook for themselves.

  • http://duodishes.wordpress.com/ The Duo Dishes

    Besides hoisin, miso and sesame are our other two faves for Asian flavorings. This hotpot looks so awesome! We really want to go to a restaurant that serves this up.

  • http://duodishes.wordpress.com The Duo Dishes

    Besides hoisin, miso and sesame are our other two faves for Asian flavorings. This hotpot looks so awesome! We really want to go to a restaurant that serves this up.

  • http://inomthings.blogspot.com/ ila

    i had nabe last night for dinner too!!! but i did a mizutaki sprinkled with koh reh gu su. ate with ponzu and momiji, and we closed it with udon :d
    nabe season, i swear i go through at least a dozen napa cabbages.

  • http://inomthings.blogspot.com ila

    i had nabe last night for dinner too!!! but i did a mizutaki sprinkled with koh reh gu su. ate with ponzu and momiji, and we closed it with udon :d
    nabe season, i swear i go through at least a dozen napa cabbages.

  • http://www.eatingclubvancouver.com/ _ts of [eatingclub] vancouver

    Tahini, eh? Cool. ;)

  • http://www.eatingclubvancouver.com _ts of [eatingclub] vancouver

    Tahini, eh? Cool. ;)

  • http://www.redcook.net Kian

    T’is the season for hot pot. Yum!

  • http://www.redcook.net Kian

    T’is the season for hot pot. Yum!

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  • http://www.Murasaki-Mary.deviantart.com/ Murasaki-Mary

    I followed the directions pretty closely, and this turned out really good. >w<

  • http://www.Murasaki-Mary.deviantart.com Murasaki-Mary

    I followed the directions pretty closely, and this turned out really good. >w<

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  • Kapshida

    Great post! I have a question – what’s the difference between nabe and oden?

    • Anonymous

      Nabe literally means “cooking pot” and usually refers to a claypot. Anything
      made in a claypot (usually at the table) is considered nabemono or “things
      made in a cooking pot”. Oden is a specific dish that could be made in a
      nabe, but it’s usually not considered nabemono since it’s usually cooked in
      a much bigger pot. Hope that helps:-)

      • Kapshida

        Yes, this helps a lot! Thanks for the response. I just came across your site rather haphazardly and have it bookmarked now. Look forward to your posts!

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I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques and give you the confidence and inspiration so that you can cook without recipes too!

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