Japanese Chashu

Chashu Donburi

Chashu is a dish made of fattier cuts of pork that are braised over low heat for a very long time. The low, slow cooking, renders out the fat while turning the tough collagen in the meat into gelatin which keeps the meat moist while making it meltingly tender.

If you’re thinking the name sounds an awful lot like the Chinese barbecued pork dish Char Siu, you’d be right, because at some point in the past, they were one and the same. Chashu is often served atop another dish that also originated in China: ramen. Like its noodley brethren, it’s evolved over the past century to the point where it bears little resemblance to the original dish it was based on.

Chashu Ramen

In the hyper competitive world of ramen in Japan, each shop jealously guards its secret Chashu formula. Revealing these secrets is the kind of offense that will have a dozen masked men in black ninja suits at your door to make you “disappear” in the middle of the night.

Such is my addiction to this luscious dish, that I’ve set aside all concerns about personal safety to recreate Santouka Ramen’s famed “toroniku” Chashu, which can best be described as savoury butter with bits of tender pork suspended inside. It literally melts into a pool of flavour on your tongue and easily makes the list of things I’d want to have in my last meal.

Pork Cheek Meat for Chashu

The trick is to use pork cheek instead of the usual pork shoulder or belly that most people use for Chashu. If you’ve never tried it before, pork cheek is porcine perfection, taking the best qualities of a tasty cut like shoulder and marbling in a lattice of fat between the pink strands meat. When braised, the pieces of meat are almost imperceptibly suspended in a mesh of fat, that instantly liquefies when it enters your warm mouth.

Chashu also known as toroniku

For the braising liquid, I used a combination of soy sauce and miso. It’s not a particularly orthodox approach to Chashu making, but I’m pretty sure it’s what Santouka does. To bring my version full circle back to its Chinese roots, I’ve also added garlic, ginger, and white pepper which give the meat some character without overwhelming its porky goodness.

I serve this over my home-made tonkotsu ramen, but it’s also great on top of rice, or in fried rice; I’ve even been know to add it to pastas or a Banh Mi or two.

Japanese Chashu

2 well marbled pork cheeks (or pork belly)
3/4 C water
1 Tbs sugar
1 Tbs miso
2 Tbs soy sauce
2 Tbs mirin
2 Tbs sake
1″ piece of ginger sliced
2 cloves garlic smashed
12 white pepper corns

Put all the ingredients in a pot large enough to accommodate the pork in one layer but small enough so the liquid more or less covers the pork. Partially cover with a lid and simmer over medium low heat for one hour, or until a fork easily passes through the meat. Allow the pork to cool in the braising liquid then remove the meat from the liquid. Wrap in plastic and chill in the refrigerator (this makes it easier to slice).

Slice the Chashu hinly against the grain and serve on top of ramen (the heat from the soup should warm it up). This is also great sliced a little thicker and warmed up on top of a bowl of rice with a little of the braising liquid drizzled on top.

  • http://www.chocolateshavings.ca/ chocolate shavings

    Is it problematic that I want a bite of this and it’s not even 9AM yet?

  • http://www.chocolateshavings.ca chocolate shavings

    Is it problematic that I want a bite of this and it’s not even 9AM yet?

  • http://gagainthekitchen.blogspot.com/ gaga

    I’ve never seen pork cheek before, just look at that marbling!!! That is simply amazing.

  • http://gagainthekitchen.blogspot.com gaga

    I’ve never seen pork cheek before, just look at that marbling!!! That is simply amazing.

  • http://www.figandcherry.com/ Christie @ Fig&Cherry

    The words ‘fatty’ and ‘pork’ are meant to be together! This look divine Marc!

  • http://www.figandcherry.com Christie @ Fig&Cherry

    The words ‘fatty’ and ‘pork’ are meant to be together! This look divine Marc!

  • http://cookappeal.blogspot.com/ Chef E

    Another great recipe and post on here…and I agree with Christie @ Fig & Cherry…two perfect words in unison!

  • http://cookappeal.blogspot.com/ Chef E

    Another great recipe and post on here…and I agree with Christie @ Fig & Cherry…two perfect words in unison!

  • http://ravenouscouple.blogspot.com/ ravenouscouple

    this looks look pork candy…yum!

  • http://ravenouscouple.blogspot.com ravenouscouple

    this looks look pork candy…yum!

  • http://www.humblebeanblog.com/ Azusa

    Amazing—I must try this! This sounds a lot easier that I though it’d be. Thanks for sharing!

  • http://www.humblebeanblog.com/ Azusa

    Amazing—I must try this! This sounds a lot easier that I though it’d be. Thanks for sharing!

  • http://www.theediblelibrary.com/ Meaghan

    That looks amazing. My half-Japanese boyfriend is a sucker for anything ramen or pork, and would love this. Yum!

  • http://www.theediblelibrary.com Meaghan

    That looks amazing. My half-Japanese boyfriend is a sucker for anything ramen or pork, and would love this. Yum!

  • http://www.theediblelibrary.com/ Meaghan

    PS-it reminds me of the movie Tampopo where the man is explaining ramen appreciation– you have to keep your eye on the pork while you eat noodles, etc. So wonderful!

  • http://www.theediblelibrary.com Meaghan

    PS-it reminds me of the movie Tampopo where the man is explaining ramen appreciation– you have to keep your eye on the pork while you eat noodles, etc. So wonderful!

  • http://zencancook.com/ zenchef

    It’s funny you post that now because i was looking for Chashu recipes on the web over the week-end. I have to use that flavorful pig feet broth and i was thinking about making Ramen. Perfect!

    I guess i have to go back to Mitsuwa to get some of those super-marbled pork cheeks now.

  • http://zencancook.com zenchef

    It’s funny you post that now because i was looking for Chashu recipes on the web over the week-end. I have to use that flavorful pig feet broth and i was thinking about making Ramen. Perfect!

    I guess i have to go back to Mitsuwa to get some of those super-marbled pork cheeks now.

  • http://www.pinoycravings.com/ Pinoy Food Cravings

    I never liked Japanese food before but when my friend invited me to have a japanese lunch here in Manila, everything changed and im now addicted.

    nice photos and btw your wordpress theme is awesome, I hope you can tell me who designed it:)

  • http://www.pinoycravings.com Pinoy Food Cravings

    I never liked Japanese food before but when my friend invited me to have a japanese lunch here in Manila, everything changed and im now addicted.

    nice photos and btw your wordpress theme is awesome, I hope you can tell me who designed it:)

  • Sean

    I loooove Santouka, but its all the way on the other side of town so I never get to go (I’m in silverlake). I really want to try doing this, but I have never seen Pork Cheeks anywhere. Most of my meat comes from either Whole Foods or the Farmers Market at the grove. Any idea where I can score some beautifully marbled pork cheeks like that?

    • marc

      I’m not sure where you can score pork cheek in LA, but I get mine here in NY at Mitsuwa. I think you guys have one there too?

      • http://www.umamimart.com/ Ryohei

        Western beef sells pork jowl (which is lost in translation since pork cheek in Japan actually means pork jowl. Cheek meat isn’t what’s called toroniku). It’s the cheapest pork at the store, called something like “pork for broth” or something. It’s $1.99 lb. It’s thin and buried among gross looking soup bones of sorts. Though you have to cut a lot of fat out, it’s completely utterly worth it! Everytime I see them, I buy them all.

  • Sean

    I loooove Santouka, but its all the way on the other side of town so I never get to go (I’m in silverlake). I really want to try doing this, but I have never seen Pork Cheeks anywhere. Most of my meat comes from either Whole Foods or the Farmers Market at the grove. Any idea where I can score some beautifully marbled pork cheeks like that?

    • marc

      I’m not sure where you can score pork cheek in LA, but I get mine here in NY at Mitsuwa. I think you guys have one there too?

      • http://www.umamimart.com Ryohei

        Western beef sells pork jowl (which is lost in translation since pork cheek in Japan actually means pork jowl. Cheek meat isn’t what’s called toroniku). It’s the cheapest pork at the store, called something like “pork for broth” or something. It’s $1.99 lb. It’s thin and buried among gross looking soup bones of sorts. Though you have to cut a lot of fat out, it’s completely utterly worth it! Everytime I see them, I buy them all.

  • http://diaryofafanaticfoodie.com/ heather

    mmmmm. that looks good. your chopsticks are so pretty, too!

  • http://diaryofafanaticfoodie.com heather

    mmmmm. that looks good. your chopsticks are so pretty, too!

  • http://www.bouchonfor2.com/ Mel @ bouchonfor2.com

    Pork cheek is likely my favourite cut from the animal. I enjoy it simply grilled or in hotpot. This looks delicious, Marc :) I wouldn’t expect anything less from you, of course!

    I’m rarely turned on by chashu at ramen joints around town… and it didn’t really stand out to me when I had ramen in Tokyo either. Improper fat distribution is usually the cause. Pork cheek! Problem solved.

  • http://www.bouchonfor2.com Mel @ bouchonfor2.com

    Pork cheek is likely my favourite cut from the animal. I enjoy it simply grilled or in hotpot. This looks delicious, Marc :) I wouldn’t expect anything less from you, of course!

    I’m rarely turned on by chashu at ramen joints around town… and it didn’t really stand out to me when I had ramen in Tokyo either. Improper fat distribution is usually the cause. Pork cheek! Problem solved.

  • http://eataduckimust.blogspot.com/ Jared

    I am going to try this recipe with pork cheeks when we get back. Now I just need to figure out how to make the soup so white and silky, and I will be set!! Maybe I should get a part time job at Santouka here in Chicago.

  • http://eataduckimust.blogspot.com/ Jared

    I am going to try this recipe with pork cheeks when we get back. Now I just need to figure out how to make the soup so white and silky, and I will be set!! Maybe I should get a part time job at Santouka here in Chicago.

  • Mike Pierce

    I’ve never been less than very impressed with any of Marc’s food, and his Char Sui is among my favorite dishes in the world (I make it more often than I should – can’t help myself). This looks beyond extraordinary however and I’ve got a strong feeling it could be the ne plus ultra of Banh Mi. I will be trying the Chashu this weekend. Thanks Marc – you have brought much joy to my family and friends!

  • Mike Pierce

    I’ve never been less than very impressed with any of Marc’s food, and his Char Sui is among my favorite dishes in the world (I make it more often than I should – can’t help myself). This looks beyond extraordinary however and I’ve got a strong feeling it could be the ne plus ultra of Banh Mi. I will be trying the Chashu this weekend. Thanks Marc – you have brought much joy to my family and friends!

  • Joanna

    Ooh, I’ve never seen raw pork cheeks before, but my idea of pig perfection (up until now at least) is guanciale, which I think is made from the cheeks as well. Will keep an eye out for the raw version because this looks ridiculously good!

  • Joanna

    Ooh, I’ve never seen raw pork cheeks before, but my idea of pig perfection (up until now at least) is guanciale, which I think is made from the cheeks as well. Will keep an eye out for the raw version because this looks ridiculously good!

  • http://colloquialcooking.com/ Colloquial Cook

    “Well-marbled” is an understatement :-D
    I miss our threesome-trips down to Mitsuwa. I can’t even find nori here dammit!

  • http://colloquialcooking.com Colloquial Cook

    “Well-marbled” is an understatement :-D
    I miss our threesome-trips down to Mitsuwa. I can’t even find nori here dammit!

  • http://thesplitpea.blogspot.com/ Eralda

    I love slow cooked fatty meats. They get so delicious and melt in your mouth tender. Love the flavors here.

  • http://thesplitpea.blogspot.com Eralda

    I love slow cooked fatty meats. They get so delicious and melt in your mouth tender. Love the flavors here.

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com/ katiek @kitchensidecar

    i really want to get my hands on a pork cheek. Sound divine. I was surprised that you didn’t marinade it.

    I dream of chasu that is brined over night in soy sauce and miso and anise of some sort. Change up the techniques.

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com katiek @kitchensidecar

    i really want to get my hands on a pork cheek. Sound divine. I was surprised that you didn’t marinade it.

    I dream of chasu that is brined over night in soy sauce and miso and anise of some sort. Change up the techniques.

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com/ Manggy

    Huh, I’ve got to look out for pork cheeks. Meat cuts don’t follow names for body parts here (i.e., the word for a person’s shoulder is not the same as a pig’s shoulder). So it may require some searching and asking around. So totally worth it, though. Ramen or rice, I love it all!

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com Manggy

    Huh, I’ve got to look out for pork cheeks. Meat cuts don’t follow names for body parts here (i.e., the word for a person’s shoulder is not the same as a pig’s shoulder). So it may require some searching and asking around. So totally worth it, though. Ramen or rice, I love it all!

  • http://www.tasteslikehome.org/ Cynthia

    Marc, here in the Caribbean while we can get most parts of pig, sometimes the names are not the same… is it literally the cheeks of the pig?

  • http://www.tasteslikehome.org Cynthia

    Marc, here in the Caribbean while we can get most parts of pig, sometimes the names are not the same… is it literally the cheeks of the pig?

  • http://www.lafujimama.com/ Fuji Mama

    Well, since I see you’ve posted something since this post, we don’t need to send out a search party for your body yet. But those ninjas are known to be sneaky and wait until you’re unsuspecting, so watch your back! All joking aside, this looks so good I could lick my computer screen. It has been forever since I’ve made chashu–I think it’s time to make some again.

  • http://www.lafujimama.com Fuji Mama

    Well, since I see you’ve posted something since this post, we don’t need to send out a search party for your body yet. But those ninjas are known to be sneaky and wait until you’re unsuspecting, so watch your back! All joking aside, this looks so good I could lick my computer screen. It has been forever since I’ve made chashu–I think it’s time to make some again.

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  • http://quisimangiabene.blogspot.com/ Peter

    Oh, Mitsuwa- is there anything you can’t do?

    I get cheeks from our local butcher, but they are not marbled like that. New Jersey, here I come.

  • http://quisimangiabene.blogspot.com/ Peter

    Oh, Mitsuwa- is there anything you can’t do?

    I get cheeks from our local butcher, but they are not marbled like that. New Jersey, here I come.

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com/ pigpigscorner

    omg the meat looks AMAZING! I’m bookmarking this. Hope I can get some cheeks!

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com pigpigscorner

    omg the meat looks AMAZING! I’m bookmarking this. Hope I can get some cheeks!

  • http://allthingsnice.typepad.com/ Syrie

    Thank you, thank you for sharing this recipe. Now I just have to find some pork cheeks. I’ve never seen them before. The marbling is so beautiful.

  • http://allthingsnice.typepad.com Syrie

    Thank you, thank you for sharing this recipe. Now I just have to find some pork cheeks. I’ve never seen them before. The marbling is so beautiful.

  • Ralph

    Cooked it and followed directions to the t…..excellent!! Keep it coming Marc! Although I ate everything, I would probably trim some fat off next time…I’m feeling numb on my left side right now. Also, the sauce is addicting! Thanks Marc!!

  • Ralph

    Cooked it and followed directions to the t…..excellent!! Keep it coming Marc! Although I ate everything, I would probably trim some fat off next time…I’m feeling numb on my left side right now. Also, the sauce is addicting! Thanks Marc!!

  • http://wasabiprime.blogspot.com/ wasabi prime

    Beautiful post. And it makes me so hungry looking at all the lovely ingredients! The marbling on the cheeks is just amazing.

  • http://wasabiprime.blogspot.com wasabi prime

    Beautiful post. And it makes me so hungry looking at all the lovely ingredients! The marbling on the cheeks is just amazing.

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  • http://www.myonlinemeals.com/ kathy

    I think I'm having Japanese dish tomorrow. lol! nice photos. Your Chashu looks delish! That ramen is perfect. I just wanna try this. The sooner the better. Thanks for this post!

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  • John (cho-tabetai)

    I have not been so suceessful making cha-shu. I'll give this recipe a go

  • http://globetrotterdiaries.com/ Valerie

    This was always my favorite dish at shogatsu! I remember my grandmother trying to chase us kids out of the kitchen when we'd come around to steal it before she had put it out on the table! I don't know now what cut of meat she used to use to make this but I'm going to have to experiment because now I'm seriously craving… Thanks for the recipe!

  • Emorie33

    So you have revealed the famed Santouka chasu recipe…….any luck with the shio ramen of the same brand???haha

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  • Rx4foodies

    This was just delicious. I made this tonight as a topping for our won ton soup. Absolutely amazing. Thank you for sharing the recipe!

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  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EJOBBK62LX6JNGRVFOULNGKRSE Anonymous

    i had this with my friend and her mom at this japenese resturaunt called Kobe. and the cook acually cooked and fried it and all that mess in front of us! so cool!

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  • http://www.bbqphx.com Tracy

    Oh, man-this was sublime!  I used to live a few miles from Santouka in Illinois and got addicted to their spicy miso ramen.  Since moving to Arizona ten years ago I’ve not been able to find much that even comes close so I’ve tried to make my own.  The chasu was the last piece of the puzzle and this is just spot on!

  • Tob

    What kind of miso (red/brown/white/?) do you use?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It’s not the main flavoring so it really doesn’t matter, use whatever you have.

      • Tob

        Thanks Marc – this came out deliciously with the ramen recipe. 

  • http://profiles.google.com/hamtons junyang chen

    I tried this yesterday, the “sauce” dries out until it no longer covers the meat. Do I add more water or let it be? Thanks (: from Singapore

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The sauce will reduce a little while simmering. You can move the meat around and flip it over to ensure it absorbs the flavors evenly, if it gets so dried out you’re worried it will burn you can add water.

      • http://profiles.google.com/hamtons junyang chen

        ok thanks (: cooking another batch right now. finally got some pork cheeks from the local butcher

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=584651521 Kuan Wong

    i’m going to give this a go!!

  • Mizz Bee

    Hello, first off I want to say how much I enjoy your website!! I plan on cooking a lot from your recipes! Also, I have a question to the pork cheek….is it the cheek from the face of the cheek from the rump?? I went here to my local carniceria and they will try to order it for me but they had quite a skeptical look on their faces stating that pork cheek is nothing but fat with no meat in between strands like your picture is showing. So, I thought, there is another type of cheek on the pig…….and I gotta ask :o))

    Thank you very much for clarification!! Many blessings!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Yep, pork cheek has a thick layer of fat, but underneath is a thin piece of well marbled meat. You’ll probably want to get most of the fat trimmed off.

  • Yogicfoodie

    Hi Marc,
    Oh my, oh my, OH MY~~!!!  I’ve made cha-shu many a times, but never with miso.  It’s simmering away on my stove at this moment and my two toddlers are begging more for the broth!!!I am so throughly enjoying your site!  Miso brings such depth and dimension to my chashu.  Thank you again keep the post coming.

  • Mhagenplacer3

    This website is A++mazing! I remember learning to cook by watching food network and home but never making any of the recipes.  The trick for me was to remember the combinations that paired well together and synthesize meal ideas from that.  I’m so thrilled to find a solid Japanese/Chinese blog that will help me master this amazing cuisine! Thanks so much for your wonderful website Marc! Have a good day!!

  • lisa

    could i use any type of miso?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Yep any kind should work. White miso will get you a lighter flavor and lighter color, red miso will get you a more intense flavor and darker color.

      • lisa

        thank you Marc.

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  • Alan

    Thanks for sharing this recipe. I will be trying it tomorrow but just a question, is the water 3/4 cup? It seems a bit too little to cover my pork belly. Thanks

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Yep the water quantity is right, but you probably used a bigger pot than I did. You can just double the amount of all the ingredients (except the pork) so that it’s covered it liquid, or just use a smaller pot.

  • DB

    Love this recipe! Delicious. I have found pork cheeks (for you northern Californians) not only at Mitsuw but at Han Kook, the Korean Market in Santa Clara. Asked for it unsliced, they have it in back. :)

  • Ari

    I hate to sound dumb here but I just can’t figure out what kind of cheek you’re referring to. D: like the rump or the face?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It’s part of the face:-)

      • Ari

        Aha! That’s what I thought, but I had to make sure. I absolutely can’t wait to make this and the pork ramen. Thanks so much. :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/siuling.lingniu Siu Ling Ling Niu

    I dont have any miso – hmm wonder if I could use Chou Hou paste . . . I am going to try it!

  • kirstine

    marc, when you say miso here, is it miso paste? where can I find it? I’m new to cooking world, hence there’s a lot of ingredients that I’m not familiar with, plus I live in small city with no china town available, so I have to find them through ebay or amazon….

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Kirstine, Miso is a paste made from fermented soybeans that comes in a bunch of different varieties (black, red, white, yellow, country-style, etc). I usually use yellow or red miso for this (yellow miso is often called white miso in the US, but it’s different from the white miso in Japan). If you’re based in the US you can order Japanese ingredients online through Marukai or Mitsuwa.

  • jeeplibby02

    Hi Marc,
    First time here. I live in a town where the only good tonkotsu ramen comes from a restaurant that charges $16 a bowl, and is a bit hard to get to on those snowy days when all I want to eat is a big steamy bowl of porky-noodley goodness, but don’t want to drive to get it. So, thanks for making it possible for me to try a homemade version. I was able to find find pork jowl at a Korean market nearby, but it is already sliced into fairly thin strips (approx. half the width of a slice of bacon). How should I adjust this recipe to account for that? Thanks in advance.

    Libby

  • Foodlover

    Hmmm, I am really puzzled: I tried your recipe but the result was not even close of what you show in the second picture. I suspect you pan fry the cheeks first to get that nice thin brown colored crust?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Foodlover, nope I didn’t pan fry it first, the cheeks go straight into the broth. The brown color comes from the soy sauce and miso in the sauce. Can you describe what went wrong in a little more detail?

      • Foodlover

        Hi Marc, thanks for replying. I think I know what went wrong now. Because of the large quantity of meat I had to process I didn’t do it in one even layer. So the cheeks turned brown throughout, no crusting. So I assume if you do it correctly, the liquid will be almost evaporated after the 1 hour gently simmer and that would also explain why the browning is more pronounced on 1 side.

        Secondly, the pork cheeks I can get here in Belgium are no where as nice and white marbled as you show. I guess those are harder to come by. Am I right?

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          Sounds like that may have been a problem. It’s definitely better to do it in one layer. If the meat isn’t soaking in the liquid it will not take on color, and if there was too much pork, it would have released too much liquid watering down the cooking liquid. As for the pork cheeks, these are from kurobuta (berkshire pork) it’s a heritage breed known for having more fat than the commercial pork sold in grocery stores these days. I hope that helps.

          • Foodlover

            Yes, I figured it should be Berkshire pork. Thanks for confirming.

            I will give this another trial and let you know my result!

        • changu420

          In Europe you can try to find Iberico park cheeks from Spain. I know that breed is readily accessible out there.

  • ATB

    Hi Marc,
    Tks you for your sharing recipes. Actually, I’m crazy with Hokkaido Santouka Ramen. Could you tell me how to cook Spicy miso ramen that similar Santouka’s flavor ? One more, Do you think Santouka uses pork cheek from Kurobuta ? Tks you for you help.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi ATB, I love Santouka’s chashu, but I’m not a huge fan of the ramen itself. You can check out my tonkotsu ramen recipe for a richer soup that’s closer to Ippudo’s than Santouka’s. As for the toroniku, yep, I actually used kurobuta (berkshire pork) cheek. Mitsuwa stocks it from time to time (presumably to supply Santouka (which has branches in their stores).

  • Chiaki

    Hi, Marc,

    Could you provide the approximate weight for the pork cheek used in this recipe? Based on the seasonings, I can only guess the pork is about 1/2 lb.

    Greatly appreciated.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Chiaki, to be honest I don’t remember the weight measure, a 1/2 pound sounds like a reasonable assumption. That said it doesn’t need to be precise, as long as they are submerged in liquid, which you can adjust by using a smaller pot, or adding more liquid (just double the other ingredients).

  • Mishu

    Would you recommend a brand of soya sauce that is best to make this chashu?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I use Kikkoman, but any Japanese soy sauce will work fine.

  • Tatsuo Yamaguchi

    no more Japanese soy sauce from Japan it’s all contaminated with radiation. Soy beans have grown near fukushima.

  • Mister Meaning

    “One and the same” STED “one in the same.” The first phrase is a repetitive affirmation that two things are exactly alike. One could say “They are one,” or “They are the same” and achieve the same meaning. The second phrase doesn’t mean anything.

  • Yohan Sinha

    Hi Marc,
    if I were to use the belly should I keep the skin on when cooking?
    thanks

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Yohan, Japanese chashu doesn’t use the skin (you can’t buy pork belly with skin-on here), that said, as long as you cook it long enough (to tenderize the skin) I don’t see why you couldn’t leave it on.

  • some body

    wawa

  • some body

    but it looks good

  • some body

    so whats up guys what are we talking about food ? lol jkn

  • some body

    real boring now lol

  • thisisthestorm

    I am now hungry and distracted.
    Oh wait, I’m always hungry and distracted.

  • superelastic

    I am making my first attempt at this right now…it’s very exciting and I want to thank you so much for sharing.

    One question, if you would be so kind. I had Santouka’s “Miso Ramen” a few weeks ago. I assume miso is a fundamental ingredient, and yet you use tahini. Would I be off-base to use miso paste instead of tahini? I was always under the impression that tahini was a middle-eastern thing, not Japanese. Thanks again.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Superelastic, there’s no tahini in this recipe, so I’m assuming you’re referring to my Tonkotsu ramen? If so, Tonkotsu ramen is a different style of ramen (from the southern island of Japan) from miso ramen (from the northern island of Japan) and does not include miso. I do have a recipe for a miso flavored Tonkotsu here http://norecipes.com/tonkotsu-miso-ramen-recipe/

      As for the tahini, you’re right it is a middle eastern in ingredient, but it’s the closest thing to nerigoma you can get in the US and has a fairly similar flavor. The difference is that nerigoma is made with whole sesame seeds (including the hull), tahini is made with only the kernel inside the hull of the sesame seed. It’s there to add creaminess and richness as well as a little flavor, so I would not recommend leaving it out.

Welcome!

I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques and give you the confidence and inspiration so that you can cook without recipes too!

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