Menudo

Menudo with onions, cilantro and lime

I know I’ve been going off topic lately, covering everything from baseball to my travels, but I assure you this post isn’t about that 80’s boy band that incubated no-talent hacks stars like Ricky Martin.

Some of you may consider this comforting Mexican offal stew equally cringe-worthy, but I think it gets a bum wrap because of the odd ingredients, which admittedly require some amount of care to prepare correctly. I have to tell you though that this piquant and hearty stew is the perfect recovery food after a long night spent throwing back cervezas.

Onions, cilantro and limes

To be totally honest, I’m not a huge fan of offal. The strong minerally taste of liver and kidney keep those organs off my plate and out of my kitchen. Tripe is a different animal though (figuratively if not literally) and when prepared properly it’s downright mild in comparison to other organ meats.

Like in many cultures, Menudo’s origins are rooted in the fact that offal was considered a garbage cut and was thus very cheap. This made it a good source of protein for the masses. Today, there are many regional variations, but most include tripe , which are the stomachs (yes they have more than one) of ruminant animals.

Tripe and Trotters braising in an aromatic liquid

I’ve used a combination of honeycomb tripe (the second stomach of a cow) along with pig trotters, for a rich collagen laden broth. By soaking, par boiling then braising the tripe for hours in an aromatic broth, all but the faintest traces of the stomach’s former contents are eliminated. The slow braise converts the connective tissues into gelatin and the naturally spongy structure of the tripe help it absorb all the good flavours in the cooking liquid.

While they may not look it, the trotters are quite tame in comparison to tripe and have started showing up on menu’s all over the country. In New York City, there’s even a Japanese restaurant that specializes in pig trotters. When cooked for a long time, they create a wonderful stock, and the connective tissue and cartilage soften to a jelly like consistency that’s creamy, rich and fulfilling. After the bones are removed and the meat is cut up, you really wouldn’t know what it was unless you were looking for it.

Menudo

The finished dish has a bright red color coming from the sweet dried guajillo chilies. With small bits of starchy hominy, this makes for a wonderfully satisfying all-in-one meal. To give the slow cooked stew a little freshness, and to further obscure the offal, serve this with a healthy squeeze of lime juice, onions and cilantro. The leftovers are fantastic served with scrambled eggs and tortillas.

2 lbs tripe
2 pig trotters (foot)

for braising liquid
10 C water
1 large onion slices
1 head garlic smashed
stems and roots of 5 cilantro plants
1 tbs black peppercorns
2 bay leaves
1 tsp cumin seeds
2 tsp Mexican oregano
4 small spicy red chilies (I used Japanese ones)
3 Tbs kosher salt (halve if using table salt)
2 Tbs vinegar

for menudo
4 oz dried guajillo chilies
3 C white hominy
2 Tbs vinegar
2 Tbs sugar
2 cloves garlic minced
1 tsp Mexican oregano
1/2 tsp ground cumin

If your tripe has been bleached (white color), soak it in a couple changes of cold water for a few hours to get rid of the chlorine smell. If you are using unbleached tripe (grey or greenish brown), thoroughly clean it under cold water and remove any extra fat on the smooth side.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil then add the tripe and trotters. Boil for about 5 minutes then drain, discarding the water, and wash the tripe and foot clean of any brown gunk that’s collected on the surface.

Wash the pot out and return the cleaned tripe and trotter to the pot then add all the ingredients for the braising liquid. Cover and bring to a boil, then turn down the heat to low and simmer for 3 hours. Turn off the heat and allow it to cool to room temperature.

Remove the tripe and brush off any spices or brown stuff. Slice it into 1/2″ x 2″ strips. Remove the trotters, clean and strip off the meat and tendon then roughly chop. Strain the stock through a double mesh strainer into a bowl and press on the solids. Wash out the pot and add the chopped tripe and trotter back into the pot.

Place the oven rack in the lower middle position and preheat to 350 degrees F. Tear the guajillo chilies open, discarding the stems and seeds. Flatten the chilies on a foil lined baking sheet then spritz with cooking spray. Put the chilies in the oven for about 5 minutes or until you start smelling sweet and peppery, be careful not to burn them. Remove them from the oven and cover with very hot tap water and allow them to rehydrate (about 15-20 minutes).

Drain the chilies and put them in a blender with about half the stock. Puree until smooth, adding more stock if needed. Strain the chili mixture through a double mesh strainer into the pot with the tripe and trotters. Once you have strained the chili mixture, pour the rest of the stock through the strainer into the pot, pressing on any remaining solids.

If you are using frozen hominy, measure out 3 cups into the pot. If you are using canned hominy, wash and soak in cold water to get rid of the “canned” taste. Add the rest of the menudo ingredients, lightly salt to taste and simmer uncovered for about an hour, until the tripe has taken on the color of the chilies and the soup is nice and thick. Check once last time for salt and augment if needed.

It’s best if you let it sit overnight for the flavours to mingle, but you can also eat it right away. Serve with tortillas, chopped sweet onions, cilantro and lots of lime.

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  • http://onlinepastrychef.wordpress.com/ Jenni

    Gorgeous color on that, Marc! As I said before, I’ve never tried it, but I might just have to road trip up to NYC to have a bite of your version :)

  • http://onlinepastrychef.wordpress.com Jenni

    Gorgeous color on that, Marc! As I said before, I’ve never tried it, but I might just have to road trip up to NYC to have a bite of your version :)

  • http://www.palatetopen.com/ Jen

    I must admit that you’ve discovered the beauty of offal in these pictures. How do you do that? :)

    When I lived in the North End, the butcher shop displayed a heap of tripe in their window. Each day I walked by that shop and wondered how I’d ever prepare it. This recipe would have been the ticket!

    • http://www.deglazeme.blogspot.com/ Christina@DeglazeMe

      Jen, are you referring to the North End in Boston? I live in Cambridge, MA, and have heard that the North End has some very authentic old-country-style tripe!

  • http://www.palatetopen.com/ Jen

    I must admit that you’ve discovered the beauty of offal in these pictures. How do you do that? :)

    When I lived in the North End, the butcher shop displayed a heap of tripe in their window. Each day I walked by that shop and wondered how I’d ever prepare it. This recipe would have been the ticket!

    • http://www.deglazeme.blogspot.com Christina@DeglazeMe

      Jen, are you referring to the North End in Boston? I live in Cambridge, MA, and have heard that the North End has some very authentic old-country-style tripe!

  • http://chefholly.typepad.com/holly_hadsell_el_hajji/2008/12/infused-vodka.html Holly

    I thought this would be next after the tripe post. Looks great and flavors sound wonderful but I will pass. I am not an offal girl! I will just take some sauce over rice.

  • http://chefholly.typepad.com/holly_hadsell_el_hajji/2008/12/infused-vodka.html Holly

    I thought this would be next after the tripe post. Looks great and flavors sound wonderful but I will pass. I am not an offal girl! I will just take some sauce over rice.

  • http://www.practicallydone.com/ helen

    Mexican offal stew – where have you been all my life?

  • http://www.practicallydone.com helen

    Mexican offal stew – where have you been all my life?

  • http://lisaiscooking.blogspot.com/ lisaiscooking

    It looks gorgeous and great job, but I just don’t think I can do tripe. Now, a vegetarian version, I would definitely want to eat.

  • http://lisaiscooking.blogspot.com/ lisaiscooking

    It looks gorgeous and great job, but I just don’t think I can do tripe. Now, a vegetarian version, I would definitely want to eat.

  • http://foodalogue.com/ Joan Nova

    Call me crazy but I think this looks delicious!

  • http://foodalogue.com Joan Nova

    Call me crazy but I think this looks delicious!

  • http://www.foodgal.com/ Carolyn Jung

    I have to admit I was never a big fan of tripe. The rest of my family would happily eat their fill whenever my late-Mom cooked it. Me? I always opted for something else that night. But recently, I tried tripe at Incanto restaurant in San Francisco, where Chef Chris Cosentino is famous for his way with offal. After one taste, I finally realized why everyone else loves this stuff so much. Cosentino’s version was sooooo tender. The texture truly was sublime.

    • marc

      I’ve heard so much about Incanto I really do have to give it a try the next time I’m out there.

  • http://www.foodgal.com Carolyn Jung

    I have to admit I was never a big fan of tripe. The rest of my family would happily eat their fill whenever my late-Mom cooked it. Me? I always opted for something else that night. But recently, I tried tripe at Incanto restaurant in San Francisco, where Chef Chris Cosentino is famous for his way with offal. After one taste, I finally realized why everyone else loves this stuff so much. Cosentino’s version was sooooo tender. The texture truly was sublime.

    • marc

      I’ve heard so much about Incanto I really do have to give it a try the next time I’m out there.

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com/ katiek

    I had menudo for the first time a month ago when I was in Jalos, Mexico. Despite it not being my favorite brunch meal, I did appreciate the intense acidic flavor that was needed to cut that “offal” flavor.

    I like to eat it with an un-abashedly large serving of limes.

    In the end I think I prefer birria in the context of mexican specialty dishes. Although I’d love to try and cook this.

    • marc

      I agree on the lime. It helps tame the gaminess and I love the spicy/salty/sour contrast.

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com katiek

    I had menudo for the first time a month ago when I was in Jalos, Mexico. Despite it not being my favorite brunch meal, I did appreciate the intense acidic flavor that was needed to cut that “offal” flavor.

    I like to eat it with an un-abashedly large serving of limes.

    In the end I think I prefer birria in the context of mexican specialty dishes. Although I’d love to try and cook this.

    • marc

      I agree on the lime. It helps tame the gaminess and I love the spicy/salty/sour contrast.

  • http://duodishes.wordpress.com/ The Duo Dishes

    Well Ricky Martin did come to mind immediately, but this is probably better than a singing Ricky.

  • http://duodishes.wordpress.com The Duo Dishes

    Well Ricky Martin did come to mind immediately, but this is probably better than a singing Ricky.

  • http://brooklynfarmhouse.com/ megan (brooklyn farmhouse)

    Love it – is tripe better than Ricky Martin?? I think most def.

  • http://brooklynfarmhouse.com megan (brooklyn farmhouse)

    Love it – is tripe better than Ricky Martin?? I think most def.

  • http://colloquialcookin.canalblog.com/ Colloquial Cook

    I can’t see the link with Ricky Martin for the life of me, but who cares. This looks tremendous. Even tripe looks good when YOU take a picture of it :-) genius!

  • http://colloquialcookin.canalblog.com/ Colloquial Cook

    I can’t see the link with Ricky Martin for the life of me, but who cares. This looks tremendous. Even tripe looks good when YOU take a picture of it :-) genius!

  • http://www.sugarbar.org/ diva

    oh gosh, i’ve never had this before but it looks too amazing to pass up. the colours are gorgeous. to the fishmonger’s it is! x

  • http://www.sugarbar.org diva

    oh gosh, i’ve never had this before but it looks too amazing to pass up. the colours are gorgeous. to the fishmonger’s it is! x

  • jessichat5

    My mom used to take me to a Mexican flea market in Houston on Sundays that had a tiny tin-can of a place that served menudo at $5 a bowl, with–get this–FREE REFILLS! Sometimes I would see the locals squeeze lime juice all over a warm, soft tortilla, sprinkle salt on top, roll it up tightly and dip it into the stew. So happy to see this post–yours looks great!

  • jessichat5

    My mom used to take me to a Mexican flea market in Houston on Sundays that had a tiny tin-can of a place that served menudo at $5 a bowl, with–get this–FREE REFILLS! Sometimes I would see the locals squeeze lime juice all over a warm, soft tortilla, sprinkle salt on top, roll it up tightly and dip it into the stew. So happy to see this post–yours looks great!

  • Shari

    I tried cooking tripe once while in college (I thought it was a type of fish), and all I remember is that it filled my dorm room with a horrendous odor. I ended up throwing it away.

    Guess I could’ve used a few tips . . .

  • Shari

    I tried cooking tripe once while in college (I thought it was a type of fish), and all I remember is that it filled my dorm room with a horrendous odor. I ended up throwing it away.

    Guess I could’ve used a few tips . . .

  • http://www.hightrawadventure.blogspot.com/ Ginny

    Thanks for the great recipe. I’m in NM and eat menudo as often as I find it, which is often in the winter. I’ve only cooked it from scratch twice so I’m thankful for your detailed recipe. All the various parts are simmering on my stove right now.

    We’re having friends over for New Year’s Eve and I wanted to serve them an authentic NM good-luck-for-the-New Year meal. I’m originally from the South so I’ll be making Hoppin’ John soup, too, which is a New Years’ Eve good luck meal, too.

    I cut my tripe in tiny pieces after cooking, and it seems to be less offensive to those who think they don’t like tripe! And I remove all the bones from the pigs’ feet and cut that meat tiny as well.

    The wonderful thing, besides the deliciousness, is that menudo freezes very well so you can have a bowl anytime you want it. It seems like a lot of work, but it’s just the ticket for a cold winter day. And once you get everything simmering it’s self-care for awhile. Once everything is done and chopped and back in the pot I adjust for salt, spices, and chili-heat.

    Living in NM we are so fortunate to have all the ingredients available all year round. When I cook posole (or menudo) I double the recipe to have a stocked freezer full of yummyness.

    Thanks again for the recipe. I make posole every year, but needed a refresher on menudo. You did good! Happy New Year, Ginny

  • http://www.hightrawadventure.blogspot.com Ginny

    Thanks for the great recipe. I’m in NM and eat menudo as often as I find it, which is often in the winter. I’ve only cooked it from scratch twice so I’m thankful for your detailed recipe. All the various parts are simmering on my stove right now.

    We’re having friends over for New Year’s Eve and I wanted to serve them an authentic NM good-luck-for-the-New Year meal. I’m originally from the South so I’ll be making Hoppin’ John soup, too, which is a New Years’ Eve good luck meal, too.

    I cut my tripe in tiny pieces after cooking, and it seems to be less offensive to those who think they don’t like tripe! And I remove all the bones from the pigs’ feet and cut that meat tiny as well.

    The wonderful thing, besides the deliciousness, is that menudo freezes very well so you can have a bowl anytime you want it. It seems like a lot of work, but it’s just the ticket for a cold winter day. And once you get everything simmering it’s self-care for awhile. Once everything is done and chopped and back in the pot I adjust for salt, spices, and chili-heat.

    Living in NM we are so fortunate to have all the ingredients available all year round. When I cook posole (or menudo) I double the recipe to have a stocked freezer full of yummyness.

    Thanks again for the recipe. I make posole every year, but needed a refresher on menudo. You did good! Happy New Year, Ginny

  • Pingback: Menudo…Not just the original boy band. « Paz y Azucar Blog

  • Alfred

    Since I was a child I have been a big fan of menudo, but I learned not to eat it just anywhere. Some boil it so much it gets slimmy and doesn't taste good. Other's cook is “chilis and tripe”. This recipe seems to be the best, I can't wait to try it in a couple of days.

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  • Lito

    During a camping trip at Pescadero, CA, I went looking for a newspaper early Sunday morning and found the only gas station with a market was serving menudo. It's the best I've ever tasted! I'll have to try your recipe and hope it comes close to what I just had.

  • http://www.largepot.net/large-pot/how-to-build-a-still/ large cooking pot

    I’ll post the same information to my blog, thanks for ideas and great article.

  • Jmedellin19

    i made some and it’s toooo salty…how can you help?

    • Anonymous

      Sorry to hear it didn’t work out for you. Did you use kosher salt? If so, which brand? Morton’s tends to be significantly saltier than Diamond Crystal. If you used regular table salt, did you halve the amount of salt?

      As with any recipe, it’s usually a good idea to salt anything to your tastes as people’s preferences vary, and there’s huge variation in the salinity of various brands of salt. Depending on how salty it is, you might be able to fix it by adding some vegetables (carrots, potatoes, etc) and more water.

  • Ritmar_1

    add a peeled raw potato and let it absorb the salt.

  • White1

    This recipe is so delicious. I made it for my family & friends last night and they all loved it.

  • Rico_leo

    wait… i DONT understand why you just dont cut the tripe after the 1st 5min boil? it seems like you can skip cooling down the tripe afte the long boil if you just cut it up when u add the braising ingredients. tell me if there is a method to this madness (lol).. recipe looks great but im just trying to understand.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hahaha that’s an excellent point! It will also cook faster if you cut
      it up, so I say go for it!

      • http://www.facebook.com/celina.luvsu Celina Luvsu

        My family has been making menudo for generations and we cut it up and soak it the night before and it works perfectly.

    • Ed

      You don’t cut the tripe at the beginning because it makes it hard to filter the stock and be sure that you’ve removed any bones.

  • Rico_leo

    p.s. why does so many brands of frozen tripe have hair???? ive tried to make it twice and each time (using a different brand) it has hair in between the layers. THIS IS SOOOOO GROSS!!!!!! i just purchased some yesterday fresh from the butcher and it looks amazing! I havent fully inspected it out of the package but i looked very very close through the package and was happy to see it had no visibal hair. I hope that when i cut it up its the same story. HAS ANYONE EXPERIENCED THIS? it is the easiest way to waste $9 let me tell u.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I haven’t had the hair problem, but I hate buying tripe in the US
      because they’re all bleached. I think it’s an FDA requirement, and it
      makes the tripe smell like a swimming pool. I usually soak the tripe
      in water overnight to tone down the smell, but it doesn’t completely
      go away.

  • http://www.largepot.net Large Pot

    This is the great blog, I’m reading them for a while, thanks for the new posts!

  • http://www.largepot.net/big-cooking-pots/choosing-the-very-best-big-cooking-pot-and-pans/ big cooking pots

    This is so interested! Where can I find more like
    this?

     

  • JBDM

    Dude, you have no idea how you just changed my life! For years I’ve been searching for a menudo recipe that tasted like my local taqueria’s in San Jose, CA (I’ve tried 20+ recipes), and yours comes the closest by far. I have no idea whether their’s was “authentic” or “the best” or what, but I do know I loved it every Saturday or Sunday morning when I might have consumed too much alcohol the night before. The taqueria closed a few months ago, and in desperation I tried the menudo from four otherp local places. Theirs all tasted like the canned national brand I’ve bought occasionally in other times of desperation (e.g. when I’m out of town), so I decided to once again search the interweb for a recipe. I made yours today and I’ve already had a bowl (yummy!), but I plan on drinking heavily tonight just so I can enjoy the hangover-relieving effects a good bowl of menudo provides. Thank you!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I first fell in love with menudo while living in San Jose, perhaps we went
      to the same shop:-)

  • Candee

    Thanks for this! My uncle and my mom make an ‘American’ type Menudo with chunks of beef and only SOMETIMES with tripe. It’s good, but they use a powdered mix from Gebhardt, and I am all about doing everything from scratch. This is the only ‘weird’ thing that I will eat. Kidneys, livers, or tripe made any other way BUT in Menudo, I will not eat. I love this. Whenever we go to a local taqueria I have to make sure I don’t get the pig foot. That is something I just can’t do. My mom loves to eat that though. *shudder* 
    However, this is great with corn tortillas.

  • Cristina

    I just finished my first bowl of this recipe. I’m so glad I found it because at first I had absolutely no
    Idea how to make menudo. The soup came out great and all I found that I needed to add more of
    was salt but thats only because I use salt really lightly when I cook. I didn’t have peppercorns or cumin seeds so I just used ground and i feel it didn’t hinder the taste at all. Also, I used a little more garlic than called for, as I usually do in all recipes, and it was delicious, especially after simmering for awhile. This is definitely now my go-to recipe for menudo. Thank you! :-)

  • Kat

    I just made menudo for the first time with this recipe. I diced the tripe and cooked it in the crock pot, simmering for about 5 hours before adding the chilis. I added 4 chopped celery ribs to the simmer stage.  I used home made chili sauce instead of dried chilis (it’s what I had!). When I pureed the liquid, I added it all back to the pot so it was thicker and had the heartier stock flavor. This recipe is amazing! Thank you!

  • Steve

    did I miss it, how many servings does this recipe make?

  • Rose

    I am so impressed with this recipe. I am new to making menudo (this is my first attempt) and I will not be trying another recipe! Thank you so much for sharing this awesome recipe and for making the directions so easy to follow. Next I plan to make your Mole recipe since it is my husband’s favorite dish! Thanks again!!

  • Vanessam794

    wooow all these recipes are delicious.

  • Grldn_Paloma

    This recipe is hands down the best I’ve ever had…ever! And I’ve had a lot of menudo. I gave some to a Mexican friend of mine who said it was better than her mother’s, that’s impressive. I deem it to be more authentic than any taco shop version. I don’t believe I will ever waste money on buying it from taco shops ever again. I think the braising technique it’s the key to the entire recipe. This recipe is a real gem!

  • Atownpr

    Made this exactly as the recipe called for .. It was outstanding .. Thank younfor sharing such a great recipe!

  • http://www.facebook.com/LaLoba83 Lupe Hernandez

    This is an AMAZING recipe!!! My whole family loves menudo and have eaten it since we were little, but recently, our local go-to store for menudo left us cringing when we noticed an unpleasant odor. Needless to say, this recipe will be a lifesaver when the family comes together for Easter Sunday breakfast! THANK YOU!!

    p.s. Are you sure you aren’t Mexican? :-D

  • Mstae

    my Mexican mother in law is cooking this for me tonight… she told me not to google it, but i had to!  I think im going to be sick

  • Apacheblue99

    my husband is mexican and has been groaning that he wants some menudo. i found 2 seperate recipes and i’m thinking, ugh! i guess greengos don’t understand. yuck!

  • http://www.facebook.com/JLynnSchmidt Jessica Schmidt

    I was introduced to Menudo about 10 years ago as a hangover remedy, and boy does it work wonders! Not only does it taste incredible, but it works faster than any headache medicine I have ever taken. We always serve it up with chopped onion, fresh cilantro and lemon or lime juice.
    I have always wanted to make it from scratch, but never knew where to get the tripe. Now I work for a man that raises cows and he said that I can have all the tripe I want for free so I will be embarking on this endeavor as soon as butcher time comes!
    The biggest thing that concerns me is the prep. Is there anything I need to do from Butcher to Kitchen? I don’t think they will be preparing it in any way as they usually just throw it away. What should I do to make sure it’s menudo-ready?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      That’s awesome that you found a fresh source of tripe. In the US the FDA requires meat processors to soak tripe in chlorine (bleach) to disinfect it before selling it to consumers. While the concern is nice, I can’t imagine anyone eating tripe half raw, and in disinfecting the tripe, they make it smell like a swimming pool and take away all the flavor of the tripe. “Green tripe” (unprocessed) is probably what you’ll end up getting, possibly with some of the cow’s last meal still in it. It’s going to smell really bad, and you need to wash it very well with lots of salt to get rid of the grit and stomach contents. Do a search on Google for “cleaning tripe” for tips and videos.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Michelle-Nelson/100000191051298 Michelle Nelson

    This is one of the best recipe for meundo . Like the way it is presented too :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/george.duffy.545 George Duffy

    Been a Menudo fan for years. This looks like a good recipe. One caveat: adding salt to the boil might make the tripe rubbery. I simmer this mix for 3-5 hours. Adding chili powder and corn meal will take this recipe to another level. When finished, your broth should resemble a golden mahogany color. Traditional fixings are salsa verde, chopped onion, lemon wedges, and a few flour tortillas.

  • John Lindsey

    This recipe rocks. I’ve been using it for a while, with minor variations. (I don’t measure anything) Everyone’s taste varies but for the quick list basics, this it the place to start. If it taste’s great, EAT IT! I’ll be making this for a large group of my Mexican friends for New Years. Hey, if I can get my wife, (a good old country girl) to eat it, I must be doing something right. She loves it! Thanks for the recipe Marc.

  • wendy

    How many servings does this make?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It depends on whether you plan on serving it as an appetizer or main, but it should easily feed 4-6 people.

  • MenudoMama

    I make menudo the way my mother used to make it way back when. Out of curiosity I wanted to check online to see how others cook it. You have some very good tips! A couple of things I do differently is add a whole fresh onion instead of slicing it and take it out of the soup after its cooked. I also cut the tripe into small squares right away before cooking. I’m fortunate to get good clean cuts of tripe from our local Mexican supermarket in San Diego (Northgate market, it used to be Gonzalez market) and always ask for honeycomb cuts instead of the cheaper fatty cuts. I use a couple of packets of California red chili powder instead and add to the soup while its simmering. I also cook menudo the day before serving and refrigerate, then skim any fat from the pigs feet off the top before reheating. Note: Without pigs feet, the menudo is not as tasty. This is where a lot of restaurants cut corners and disappoint Mexican American/menudo aficionados like us. For garnishments, I serve oregano, chopped fresh onion, dried red chili, sliced lemon or lime with corn and/or flour tortillas on the side. Salud!

  • Richard Romo

    1ST OFF SOUNDS LIKE A PERFECT RECIPE…. JUST 1 QUESTION.. I READ AND RE READ THE INSTRUCTIONS OVER N OVER MAYBE IAM JUST OVER LOOKING BUT AT WHAT POINT DO I ADD ALL THE MENUDO Ingredients…for menudo
    3 C posole (hominy)
    2 Tbs vinegar
    2 Tbs sugar
    2 cloves garlic minced
    1 tsp Mexican oregano
    1/2 tsp ground cumin.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The menudo ingredients start being used in the last 4 paragraphs, the posole and other ingredients go in in the second to last paragraph.

  • David M

    I have made this recipe with great results and awesome taste but I can never get the dark red color you achieved. I used the California dried guajillo chiles. Is there a specific type of guajillo chile I am supposed to use to get the red color.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi David, how different is the color? Lighting could account for some of the color difference but it should be a deep dark red. I usually get my chiles from a mexican grocery store in Napa California (though I’m not sure where the chilies come from). As long as it tastes good I wouldn’t worry too much about the color.

  • Lindseyauctioneers

    Got a pot going right now. My wife requested it and I’m ALL IN! Gotta love that woman…and this recipe.

    • lindseyauctioneers

      Cold morning here in Conroe, Texas…off to HEB soon for Menu do making supplies.

      • lindseyauctioneers

        Menudo. Gotta love auto correct. Lol

  • tuxthelux

    I bravely gave some to a friend’s husband who grew up around real mexican food in the Bakersfield area and loves menudo. He’s totally picky, a foodie, and a critic/”authority” on almost everything edible). He raved, said it was the best menudo he’d ever had and that means a lot to me. I think it’s an incredibly wonderful recipe – WOW, thank you very much. I’m your fan.

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  • anEizBerg

    gosh I miss Mexican food..loved it when my mom made menudo or posole on Sundays. This looks exactly like her recipe..yumm!

  • jadegreen_eyz

    This is somewhat similar to the menudo I ate regularly as a teenager in southeast New Mexico (cilantro was not big in my neck of the woods in the 60’s, however). The Saturday afternoon ritual was to stop at Lujan’s Bakery, buy a big bag of bolillos (Mexican bread rolls) and then head over to a small hole-in-the-wall adobe restaurant (can’t remember its name) with a huge soup pot which they would fill up with menudo. I will have to give your recipe a try- most of the ones I have seen to date, have not had pigs feet and I believe it to be an essential ingredient. And I am fortunate to have a bag of Hatch dried red chilies on hand.

  • P0PZ

    hi

    I live along way from mexico (almost as far away from mexico as you can get) and i have never tasted real mexican food (ive had “mexican” flavored foods from supermarkets…lol)

    I’d love to try this but im stuck, im trying to find posole (hominy), i have found out from google that posole is a pork soup with hominy in it, and that hominy is a maize product.

    But im under the impression that posole is another name for hominy… is that right???
    if i cant find it here in New Zealand is there anything that could replace it???

    cheers
    P0PZ

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi P0PZ, it’s unlikely you’ll find it in NZ, hominy is a type of maize that’s been dried and soaked in lye (nixtamalized), which really changes its texture. While it won’t be quite the same, you could substitute chickpeas or even potatoes.

    • Toshia Vargas

      In Spanish, the dish is called posole, but it’s also the spanish word for hominy. Have you tried Amazon or other on-line retailers that ship overseas? That seems like the easiest way to find it if you don’t have an international food store.

  • t

    How can I do this without having to put chilies in the oven. Do I just use chilli powder? How much?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi t, you could skip the roasting step, but I wouldn’t recommend it. This dish derives most if it’s flavor from the chilies and by not roasting them you lose out in two things. The first is that as chilies sit in storage warehouses and grocery store shelves, they slowly lose heir flavor. Exposing them to the high temperatures of the oven releases oils, which restore some of their original flavor. The second benefit is that roasting will also caramelize the peppers creating new flavor compounds that you would not have if you didn’t roast them. As for “chili powder”, it’s usually a blend of spices which includes chili. When chiles (and spices for that matter) are ground, it exposes more surface area, which speeds up the degradation of flavor, which is why I recommend using whole chiles. If you must use chili powder, at least take the time to pan roast it in a dry frying pan over medium heat until fragrant.— Sent from Mailbox for iPhone

  • Sparkle

    How many servings does this recipe make?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Sparkle, it depends on how hungry people are and whether you’re serving this as a main or along with other dishes, but it should feed 6-8 pretty comfortably.

  • http://www.DiscoveringAtenas.com Niki Meeks

    This looks so good, I can’t wait to make it. We live in Costa Rica now and we have not eaten Mexican food for over 1 year now. As native Texans, we have been craving this, and you are so right, after a long night of beer drinking, nothing works like a red hot bowl of menudo. You forgot about the fresh jalepenos:)

  • http://www.DiscoveringAtenas.com Niki Meeks

    sharing this on my blog – with credits of course, thanks again!

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I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques and give you the confidence and inspiration so that you can cook without recipes too!