Niku Miso

Marc Matsumoto

Hi! I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques while giving you the confidence and inspiration to cook without recipes too!

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NIku Miso is a Japanese condiment made with miso and ground meat that's great as dip for vegetables as well as a seasoning for pasta and stir-fries.

Spring is undeniably upon us. Here in Tokyo, the cherry blossoms have bloomed, there's a warm plushness to the air, and the markets are full of spring greens and baby vegetables. Whether you're planning a spring picnic or a light meal at home, this Niku Miso (肉味噌, literally "meat miso") makes for a delicious condiment that ups your vegetable stick game.

I like to start my Niku Miso by caramelizing aromatics like shiitake mushrooms, scallions and ginger. For the meat, I use ground pork, but ground chicken or lamb would work equally well. The miso, is a blend of regular yellow miso with a bit of hatcho miso (a.k.a. black miso) thrown in for its aged complexity, but just yellow or a mixture of yellow and red would work just fine.

Niku miso with caramelized shiitake mushrooms, ground pork, scallions and ginger blended with two types of miso.

One ingredient that may seem a bit out of place ia the egg yolk, but it rounds out the harsh edges of the miso by adding body and richness to the mixture. Finally when the Niku Miso is nice and thick, a big dose of toasted sesame seeds finishes it off with a bit of crunch and a marvelous nutty flavor.

I ended up serving this for dinner with baby fennel, baby carrots, baby radishes, baby turnips, slices of bell pepper, and some blanched okra and baby corn. Although the miso is anything but light, the bulk of the meal is the vegetables, which leaves you feeling satisfied without bogging you down in the same way the meat sweats or a carb coma would.

Aside from serving it as a dip with vegetables, Niku Miso also makes for a great condiment for a bowl of rice, an easy seasoning for a vegetable stir-fry, and a tasty sandwich spread, along with veggies like shredded carrot, sliced cucumbers, lettuce and cilantro. The best part is that this will keep in the refrigerator for at least a week, which makes it perfect for those days you just don't feel like doing much in the kitchen.

Niku miso is the perfect dip for spring vegetables.

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Niku MisoSpring is undeniably upon us. Here in Tokyo, the cherry blossoms have bloomed, there's a warm plushness to the air, and the markets are full of spring greens and baby vegetables. Whether you're planning a spring picnic or a light meal at home, this Niku Miso (肉味噌, literally "meat miso") makes for a ...

Summary

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  • Coursecondiments
  • Cuisinejapanese
  • Yield1.5 cups s 1.5 cups
  • Cooking Time20 minutesPT0H20M
  • Preparation Time10 minutesPT0H10M
  • Total Time30 minutesPT0H30M

Ingredients

Based on your location, units have been adjusted to Metric measuring system. Change this?
1/2 cup
Yellow miso*
2 tablespoons
Hatcho miso
2
Egg yolks
1/3 cup
Sugar
1/2 cup
Sake
1 tablespoon
Vegetable oil
60 grams
Shiitake, finely minced
20 grams
White part of scallion, finely minced
15 grams
Ginger, finely minced
150 grams
Lean ground pork
2 tablespoons
Sesame seeds

Steps

  1. Put the yellow miso, hatcho miso, egg yolks, sugar and sake into a blender or small food processor and run until smooth
  2. Sauteeing shiitake mushooms, ginger, and scallions for niku miso, a Japanese dip.
    Add the oil to a frying pan over medium heat and saute the shiitake, scallion, and ginger until it's well browned and starting to caramelize.
    Caramelized shiitake, scallions and ginger for making niku miso.
  3. Add the pork and stir-fry, using a spatula to break up the meat into small crumbs.
    Sauteed pork, shiitake, scallions and ginger for making niku miso.
  4. Blended miso added to meat mixture for niku miso dip.
    When the meat is mostly cooked, add the miso sauce and turn down the heat to low. Cook, stirring constantly until the miso is thick enough so that when you run a spatula across the pan, the miso doesn't flow back into the gap created.
    Finished niku miso.

* In the US, yellow miso is often mislabeled "white miso". True white miso (shiromiso) is a unique style of miso from Kyoto that's made with a larger percentage of rice, which makes the miso very sweet. If you bought something labeled "white miso" in the US, chances are you have regular yellow miso. If you're unsure what kind of miso you have, taste a small amount, if it's very sweet, reduce the amount of sugar in this recipe.


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