Poached Aloe

Poached Aloe Vera with Yogurt

We’ve all heard of the miraculous feats that Aloe Vera performs on injured or sunburned skin, but did you know that Aloe is also edible?

While you only really see it being sold as a juice in healthfood stores here, in Japan, it’s quite common to see it added to beverages and yogurt. It’s one of my favourite things with yogurt (up there with passionfruit), and I love the slightly green taste and the quivery cubes of aloe that have the texture of resilient grapes.

Realizing that I may be waiting a long while for Dannon to start offering little cups with aloe on the bottom here in the States, I decided to take matters into my own hands. I’d seen aloe being sold at Essex Market before, so I made the trip out and picked up two long spears of aloe at the produce place. If you don’t have aloe growing in your back yard, you can probably find it at a Latin American grocery store.

Aloe Vera Peeled and Chopped

Because some people are funny about textures, I should warn you that raw aloe is extremely slimy. Think okra x10. Cooking it reduces the slime factor considerably, but it does still have a viscous slippery feel to it.

Cooking the aloe will give off a ton of liquid and the cubes will shrink and soften without losing their shape. On a bowl of plain yogurt with a bit of lime zest, poached aloe makes for a light refreshing breakfast and a great way to start the morning.

Poached Aloe Recipe

2 large aloe leaves peeled and cubed (about 1 lbs)
1 C sugar
Juice of 1 lime

Because the aloe is very slippery it is hard to peel, but it’s important that you get all the fiberous green peel off the aloe as it is tough and bitter. Chop the aloe into small cubes and add to a small saucepan along with the sugar and lime juice.

Cook the aloe over medium low heat until the liquid is no longer slimy and the cubes have the texture of resilient grapes. Allow to cool and serve over plain yogurt.

  • inaness

    If your lazy like me, you can also purchase canned pieces of aloe at Trader Joes. I just pop a can open and drop a couple spoons of it in my yogurt.

  • inaness

    If your lazy like me, you can also purchase canned pieces of aloe at Trader Joes. I just pop a can open and drop a couple spoons of it in my yogurt.

  • http://www.weareneverfull.com/ we are never full

    very, very interesting. who knew – of course it would be you that would teach me this. i would actually imagine it to be quite slimy. this seems like an easy enough recipe. but more importantly – what the heck does it taste like? slightly green taste – hmmmm… does it taste grass-like? chive-like? curious for you to explain further.

    • http://norecipes.com/ Marc @ NoRecipes

      It’s hard to really compare the flavor to anything, but I suppose it’s like something between green grapes and cucumber.

      • http://caviarandcodfish.com/ codfish

        Wow, green grapes and cucumber is a very good description, it really reminds me of the taste of aloe (haven’t had it since my grandfather used to grow his own).

        Love that it cooks down to resilient cubes… and the thought of it with yogurt.

  • http://www.weareneverfull.com we are never full

    very, very interesting. who knew – of course it would be you that would teach me this. i would actually imagine it to be quite slimy. this seems like an easy enough recipe. but more importantly – what the heck does it taste like? slightly green taste – hmmmm… does it taste grass-like? chive-like? curious for you to explain further.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc @ NoRecipes

      It’s hard to really compare the flavor to anything, but I suppose it’s like something between green grapes and cucumber.

      • http://caviarandcodfish.com codfish

        Wow, green grapes and cucumber is a very good description, it really reminds me of the taste of aloe (haven’t had it since my grandfather used to grow his own).

        Love that it cooks down to resilient cubes… and the thought of it with yogurt.

  • http://blog.lemonpi.net/ Y

    Well, you certainly learn something new every day, on No recipes! It looks a bit like nata de coco. Is eating it meant to be good for you as well?

    • http://norecipes.com/ Marc @ NoRecipes

      Well it has a bunch of vitamins and minerals before you cook it, but I’m not really sure how cooking it changes the nutritional content.

  • http://blog.lemonpi.net Y

    Well, you certainly learn something new every day, on No recipes! It looks a bit like nata de coco. Is eating it meant to be good for you as well?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc @ NoRecipes

      Well it has a bunch of vitamins and minerals before you cook it, but I’m not really sure how cooking it changes the nutritional content.

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com/ Manggy

    Oh! They held their shape pretty well. I’ve never eaten aloe before, but it seems way slimier and softer here. I wonder if the gel is protein or polysaccharide– and if there’s a way to harness it somehow? Anyway, I might give this a shot (though I’ll probably be the only one eating it here, heh). It does look nice and refreshing!
    (I wonder if it works on a burned tongue? Heh.)

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com Manggy

    Oh! They held their shape pretty well. I’ve never eaten aloe before, but it seems way slimier and softer here. I wonder if the gel is protein or polysaccharide– and if there’s a way to harness it somehow? Anyway, I might give this a shot (though I’ll probably be the only one eating it here, heh). It does look nice and refreshing!
    (I wonder if it works on a burned tongue? Heh.)

  • http://fivestarfoodie.blogspot.com/ Natasha – 5 Star Foodie

    My grandma used to grow aloe and we used it for medicinal purposes but I had no idea it could be edible! How unique! I am so curious to try it!

  • http://fivestarfoodie.blogspot.com Natasha – 5 Star Foodie

    My grandma used to grow aloe and we used it for medicinal purposes but I had no idea it could be edible! How unique! I am so curious to try it!

  • http://www.bravepotato.com/ Erica

    Awesome! I loved, loved, loved the aloe yogurts and drinks in Japan, and I wondered at the time how the aloe was prepared. Can’t wait to try this at home!

  • http://www.bravepotato.com Erica

    Awesome! I loved, loved, loved the aloe yogurts and drinks in Japan, and I wondered at the time how the aloe was prepared. Can’t wait to try this at home!

  • http://cookappeal.blogspot.com/ chef E

    A good friend of mine has always drank the juice, and juices it herself. I just saw Aloe at the market, and wondered what to do with it in cooking, this is great! You are very informative and I enjoy coming over here to read!

  • http://cookappeal.blogspot.com chef E

    A good friend of mine has always drank the juice, and juices it herself. I just saw Aloe at the market, and wondered what to do with it in cooking, this is great! You are very informative and I enjoy coming over here to read!

  • http://www.shesimmers.com/ Leela@shesimmers

    I once tried aloe juice (the brand sold at Trader Joe’s) and couldn’t get myself to take a second sip. It has a sharp acidic tang which is not the pleasant kind. Wonder if homemade fresh aloe juice is better. ?? So, I’ve sneaked fresh aloe into my diet by blending the fresh pulp into my morning smoothies. Considering the amount of aloe I’ve consumed this way, my skin should be flame-resistant.

    Your poached aloe looks delicious, though. Reminds me of sugar palm fruit in heavy syrup which I (and many Southeast Asian kids), growing up, always topped my ice cream with.

    • marc

      Fresh aloe just has a very strong taste if it’s not cooked, so I’m not sure if you could get around it by juicing it yourself. Smoothies are probably the way to go there.

  • http://www.shesimmers.com Leela@shesimmers

    I once tried aloe juice (the brand sold at Trader Joe’s) and couldn’t get myself to take a second sip. It has a sharp acidic tang which is not the pleasant kind. Wonder if homemade fresh aloe juice is better. ?? So, I’ve sneaked fresh aloe into my diet by blending the fresh pulp into my morning smoothies. Considering the amount of aloe I’ve consumed this way, my skin should be flame-resistant.

    Your poached aloe looks delicious, though. Reminds me of sugar palm fruit in heavy syrup which I (and many Southeast Asian kids), growing up, always topped my ice cream with.

    • marc

      Fresh aloe just has a very strong taste if it’s not cooked, so I’m not sure if you could get around it by juicing it yourself. Smoothies are probably the way to go there.

  • http://www.practicallydone.com/ helen

    Interesting indeed. I have never tasted aloe before, but I always thought its texture would be similar to konnyaku – I guess not. Perhaps it’ll be a fine addition to a cocktail as well?

    • marc

      Great idea. I’m not sure you’d want the chunks in it, but the syrup would be fantastic in cocktails. Maybe with a some lime or mint!

  • http://www.practicallydone.com helen

    Interesting indeed. I have never tasted aloe before, but I always thought its texture would be similar to konnyaku – I guess not. Perhaps it’ll be a fine addition to a cocktail as well?

    • marc

      Great idea. I’m not sure you’d want the chunks in it, but the syrup would be fantastic in cocktails. Maybe with a some lime or mint!

  • Caroline

    Aloe Vera yogurts are my favorites :-) I eat one every morning actually. I am in Switzerland and they are very common here so actually I wouldn’t be surprised if Dannon started producing them soon too…
    Your recipe looks great!

  • Caroline

    Aloe Vera yogurts are my favorites :-) I eat one every morning actually. I am in Switzerland and they are very common here so actually I wouldn’t be surprised if Dannon started producing them soon too…
    Your recipe looks great!

  • http://chefholly.typepad.com/ Holly

    Doesn’t it smell fuunky? The aloe here does, I could not imagine eating it. Leave it to you to come up with something unique again.

    • marc

      It does have a mild smell, but I’m not sure I’d call it funky… Maybe your aloe is a different kind?

  • http://chefholly.typepad.com/ Holly

    Doesn’t it smell fuunky? The aloe here does, I could not imagine eating it. Leave it to you to come up with something unique again.

    • marc

      It does have a mild smell, but I’m not sure I’d call it funky… Maybe your aloe is a different kind?

  • http://foodhuntress.blogspot.com/ enrisa marie

    Hello. I used to put aloe in my hair before (I agree with the 10x slimy) and I’ve had aloe drinks in Hong Kong two years ago with little gels in it.I haven’t tried eating aloe straight from the plant though, and i am very curious. Lots of them in my mother’s garden :)- but are there only certain types of aloe that are good for eating?

    • marc

      According to Wikipedia, “aloe vera barbadensis miller” is the type most commonly used for juice. It sounds like there are other edible varieties though.

  • http://foodhuntress.blogspot.com enrisa marie

    Hello. I used to put aloe in my hair before (I agree with the 10x slimy) and I’ve had aloe drinks in Hong Kong two years ago with little gels in it.I haven’t tried eating aloe straight from the plant though, and i am very curious. Lots of them in my mother’s garden :)- but are there only certain types of aloe that are good for eating?

    • marc

      According to Wikipedia, “aloe vera barbadensis miller” is the type most commonly used for juice. It sounds like there are other edible varieties though.

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com/ katiek @kitchensidecar

    Wow. You could really take this recipe places! So simple. Us asians love this type of texture! And grass jelly! Ooooh, can you make a grass jelly drink? That would be so good.

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com katiek @kitchensidecar

    Wow. You could really take this recipe places! So simple. Us asians love this type of texture! And grass jelly! Ooooh, can you make a grass jelly drink? That would be so good.

  • http://www.deglazeme.blogspot.com/ Christina@DeglazeMe

    My grandmother (who was Japanese) used to take big chunks off the aloe plant in our house and just crack it open and eat the contents. She swore by it! Growing up, aloe was the go-to cure-all in our family.

  • http://www.deglazeme.blogspot.com Christina@DeglazeMe

    My grandmother (who was Japanese) used to take big chunks off the aloe plant in our house and just crack it open and eat the contents. She swore by it! Growing up, aloe was the go-to cure-all in our family.

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com/ Pigpigscorner

    I love aloe vera! Wonderful use of it.

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com Pigpigscorner

    I love aloe vera! Wonderful use of it.

  • http://onlinepastrychef.wordpress.com/ Jenni

    Very cool idea, Marc! I wonder if they’d be easier to peel and deal with if you freeze them first? Never worked with aloe, so I’m not sure freezing would change the texture.

    • marc

      Great idea I may have to try this next time. I almost peeled my fingers several times while handling it because of the slime. Not sure how freezing it might change the texture though…

  • http://onlinepastrychef.wordpress.com/ Jenni

    Very cool idea, Marc! I wonder if they’d be easier to peel and deal with if you freeze them first? Never worked with aloe, so I’m not sure freezing would change the texture.

    • marc

      Great idea I may have to try this next time. I almost peeled my fingers several times while handling it because of the slime. Not sure how freezing it might change the texture though…

  • http://www.bouchonfor2.com/ Mel

    I love aloe bits in my teas. It’s much more subtle and fresh than coconut jelly and the like. Thanks for sharing :)

  • http://www.bouchonfor2.com/ Mel

    I love aloe bits in my teas. It’s much more subtle and fresh than coconut jelly and the like. Thanks for sharing :)

  • http://www.food-4tots.com/ food-4tots

    I always find fresh aloe in the wet market but never have the chance to try it out. This recipe is simple enough for me to “digest”. Hehehe! How do you choose a good aloe?

  • http://www.food-4tots.com/ food-4tots

    I always find fresh aloe in the wet market but never have the chance to try it out. This recipe is simple enough for me to “digest”. Hehehe! How do you choose a good aloe?

  • http://www.foodgal.com/ Carolyn Jung

    How interesting about the aloe. I’ve never had it like that. But those little quivering jellies sure look pretty and welcoming. I’m also thinking this might be divine as a pate de fruit.

  • http://www.foodgal.com Carolyn Jung

    How interesting about the aloe. I’ve never had it like that. But those little quivering jellies sure look pretty and welcoming. I’m also thinking this might be divine as a pate de fruit.

  • http://cooking-up-a-storm-zaayeka.blogspot.com/ Navita

    Hi there, my first time here n came here because the queer way yu=ou treated aloe…I love drinking it all the time…infact my mom-in-law had it grown in her backyard…I don’t coz I don’t have a back yard. ;p

    Loved the recipe thanks for sharing :)

    • http://norecipes.com/ bev

      This grows very well in a pot; ours is about 14″ in diameter and 14″ high with natural potting soil and I’m tending to 12 of the Aloe plants babies right now.

  • http://cooking-up-a-storm-zaayeka.blogspot.com/ Navita

    Hi there, my first time here n came here because the queer way yu=ou treated aloe…I love drinking it all the time…infact my mom-in-law had it grown in her backyard…I don’t coz I don’t have a back yard. ;p

    Loved the recipe thanks for sharing :)

    • http://norecipes.com bev

      This grows very well in a pot; ours is about 14″ in diameter and 14″ high with natural potting soil and I’m tending to 12 of the Aloe plants babies right now.

  • Marama

    I came across some Aloe Vera yoghurt in the Czech Republic and bought it expecting it to be disgusting (we always used it on burns when I was a kid and it was so BITTER!) but it was actually delicious! Now I just have to find some fresh aloe, easier said than done I suspect…

  • Marama

    I came across some Aloe Vera yoghurt in the Czech Republic and bought it expecting it to be disgusting (we always used it on burns when I was a kid and it was so BITTER!) but it was actually delicious! Now I just have to find some fresh aloe, easier said than done I suspect…

  • Pingback: Blog Jewels – Cooking Blogs « LindaLyell’s Blog

  • http://verysmallanna.com/ anna

    I’ve seen giant aloe leaves for sale at the grocery store and contemplated them (mostly poked them). Since I (sometimes) make my own yogurt I’ll have to try this at some point. I bet it’d be really nice in the summer, since aloe suggests cooling. Maybe as a frozen yogurt?

  • http://verysmallanna.com anna

    I’ve seen giant aloe leaves for sale at the grocery store and contemplated them (mostly poked them). Since I (sometimes) make my own yogurt I’ll have to try this at some point. I bet it’d be really nice in the summer, since aloe suggests cooling. Maybe as a frozen yogurt?

  • http://www.zoebakes.com/ Zoë François

    Wow, this is wonderful. I can’t wait to try it. It reminds me of the tricolor dessert from my favorite Vietnamese restaurant. That has grass jelly, I wonder if this could replace it? Worth a try!

  • http://www.zoebakes.com Zoë François

    Wow, this is wonderful. I can’t wait to try it. It reminds me of the tricolor dessert from my favorite Vietnamese restaurant. That has grass jelly, I wonder if this could replace it? Worth a try!

  • http://awesomesauceeats.wordpress.com/ Mikan

    oh gosh, I love aloe vera yogurt from Japan! I never thought about poaching the plant myself and then throwing it into yogurt. I have to try this immediately (or rather as soon as I can get myself to the market). :)

  • http://awesomesauceeats.wordpress.com/ Mikan

    oh gosh, I love aloe vera yogurt from Japan! I never thought about poaching the plant myself and then throwing it into yogurt. I have to try this immediately (or rather as soon as I can get myself to the market). :)

  • http://www.candypenny.blogspot.com/ marie

    I secretly love aloe! I’ll have to try this poached version..

  • http://www.candypenny.blogspot.com marie

    I secretly love aloe! I’ll have to try this poached version..

  • http://www.monkeeboo.com/ monkeeboo

    I somehow ended up on your site while looking for yogurt recipes. Anywho, I just tried poaching the aloe vera fresh from the garden. It is INSANELY slimey, but after 10 minutes that goes away! I just tried it on some homemade yogurt and it is fabulous! Thank you!

  • http://www.monkeeboo.com monkeeboo

    I somehow ended up on your site while looking for yogurt recipes. Anywho, I just tried poaching the aloe vera fresh from the garden. It is INSANELY slimey, but after 10 minutes that goes away! I just tried it on some homemade yogurt and it is fabulous! Thank you!

  • theresa

    ITS ALWAYS TASTE GOOD WHEN I THROW IN FRESH ALOE TO MY SALAD.

  • theresa

    ITS ALWAYS TASTE GOOD WHEN I THROW IN FRESH ALOE TO MY SALAD.

  • http://www.betterwithbutter.com/ Jada

    Thanks for this! Just picked up a huge aloe frond and there are very few recipes on the web.

  • http://www.betterwithbutter.com Jada

    Thanks for this! Just picked up a huge aloe frond and there are very few recipes on the web.

  • Darren

    Just picked a large frond off the plant outside and cooled it in the fridge. Peeled the skin off, and ate mouthfuls of the jelly inside. The gel coats your skin, and left a lining in my throat. Resists being washed off my hands. Very little taste – slightly “green”.

    I’ve always used it for burns and sensitive wounds.
    I think it would work great for a sore throat, particularly with manuka honey.

  • Darren

    Just picked a large frond off the plant outside and cooled it in the fridge. Peeled the skin off, and ate mouthfuls of the jelly inside. The gel coats your skin, and left a lining in my throat. Resists being washed off my hands. Very little taste – slightly “green”.

    I’ve always used it for burns and sensitive wounds.
    I think it would work great for a sore throat, particularly with manuka honey.

  • urbanappetizer

    But isn't Fresh aloe vera bitter?? I tried cutting a few cubes and boiled it with sugar and it was still bitter!! Is it possible to get rid of the bitterness?? Thanks.

  • norecipes

    The skin is very bitter. you have to peel it off before you cook it.
    Once peeled you should have a clear gelatinous material which
    shouldn't be bitter if you have an edible variety of aloe. Hope that
    helps.

    • Carl Schenkenberger

      We bought some edible aloe at a Latin American grocery store, but there was definitely a bitter aftertaste to the raw aloe.  I think the biggest factor in whether your aloe is going to absorb the lime and sugar (we actually used honey) when cooking is surface area.  You’ll notice that the smaller chunks taste great long before the bigger chunks lose their bitterness.  Taking the time to dice your aloe nice and small will increase the surface area and will go a long way toward giving you a sweet, tangy dish with no bitterness.

  • Nicole

    I peeled off the skin, made sure there were no green left, and I tried buying another aloe vera plant from a different store, and the clear gelatinous material is still bitter….am I buying the wrong kind of aloe vera?

  • norecipes

    To be honest I'm not sure. I go to a Latin American grocery store where they
    sell the edible variety. The
    “leaves” are typically about 2+ feet long and are 3-4″ wide at the base.

    -m

  • Nicole

    Thanks a bunch. I'll try to look for those. =]

  • Whatsitstooya21

    WOW All of this food looks really good!!

  • Grizzly_adams07

    Is the outside of an aloe vera leaf edible?

    • Anonymous

      Nope, the skin is very bitter and fibrous.

  • edd

    is there a specific time in harvesting d aloe vera? when is d best time 2 hrvst?

    • Jorge Santos Jose

      Yes you should harvest it early in the morning and or late at night.. The leaves closest to the ground are the best.

  • Maemerasberry

    I am so glad to have found your recipe. I am also a fan of the Dannon Aloe Vera yogurt. I discovered it while in the south of France. I am excited to try it. Thanks!

  • LolaAngelX

    Marc, thank you so much for your aloe vera recipe! I needed to start eating aloe for medical reasons and this is my new favorite food in the world thanks to your recipe! Its incredible… PERFECT!

  • Pingback: aloe vera recipe

  • Terri Gooch98@gmail.com

    I have used the aloe plant my entire life. I love it and firmly believe that it is a medicinal plant that can used for and in many different ways. I am eager to learn how to use it more in recipes. While your poached aloe in yogurt sounds delightful, it seems to me that a cup of sugar sabotages the health benefits of the aloe. I would suggest using Agave instead.

  • Lilskwirl

    Where could I find  large Aloe Leaves to purchase? Do I have to grow my own plant, or could I just purchase a decent sized Aloe Leaf from a store? x] I Can’t wait to try this out!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      You can pick them up at Latin American groceries.

    • J19t51

      I Buy it in the supermarket they come in large leafs….

  • Blackbear013

    I have an Amazon parrot who came into my care almost 3 years ago with liver damage, malnutrition gout. I rub the juice from an aloe leaf on his feet nightly & “he“ loves to take bites to eat from the narrow ends. This has helped tremendously. I will definitely try this recipe for both of us.

  • Kaylarace122

    I found that pureeing the aloe with pineapple juice to be quite tasty. Adding a tropical kick while the sugar takes away the bitter, “green” plant taste.

  • Pingback: Poached Aloe | La Zagala

  • KimAloe

    Hi all, firstly i love aloe vera. Great recipe by the way. Although it sounds like alot of sugar and to get the real benefits from aloe you probably wanna take it in the raw form as cooking it depletes nutrients. Also you have to take leaves from older plants (3-4 years old) for it to have the compounds. The young leaves tend to be bitter. Hope this helps. When yoi’re feeling run down or sick it really boosts your immune system.

  • Mimisan

    Thank you, I’ll try the ALOE/Yogurt right now,
    F.Y.I, You can find drinks with aloe chunks in it in…… Korea,
    unfortunatly they are more on the ” soft drink ” side,
    Lots of sugar in it.
    QUESTION : Do you have any special ” trick ” to peel it ?

  • Mimisan

    I learned one important detail from a friend in Japan :
     – While PEELING the Aloe Vera,
    make sure you do it UNDER COLD RUNNING WATER –
    this way the bitterness coming from the fibrous skin is flushed off the gel parts
    which I personally eat right away ( uncooked ), no problem with the bitterness then.
    Have fun peeling it, though….

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      For aloe I like using the type of peeler which you hold from above rather than from the side. Then i lay the aloe on a flat surface and peel it from above. This allows you to put more pressure on aloe as you’re peeling.

      • Jasonmazzo

        I lay it flat on a cutting board cut the edges then skin it like a fish filet with the knife parallel to the cutting board pressing down.  

  • Tracy Taulier

    Tried the Poached Aloe recipe…. Bitterly taste still in it, will try to prepare under cold running water next time. 

  • Viv

    The prep for this recipe is long and difficult but well worth it if you have the patience – it tastes wonderful!! With yoghurt it is perfect

  • Pingback: Bake & Cook » Aloe Vera Osmathus Honey Lemon drink

  • Lucy

    I had previously enjoyed a canned cubed unsweetened gelled Aloe Vera product, added to many recipes (especially filler in soups and salads!), but now can not find such available anywhere (internet search only shows barrels available from foreign manufacturers). It was SO convenient and no bitterness. In 2012, I had found & purchased (T.A.S. brand) 14.4oz cans at a local Asian Market. Anyone know if and where such canned product is available (in the US) now??

  • Grammar Check

    It is losing, not loosing!

  • Pingback: Top 10 Delicious Juices For Healthy Skin - Top Inspired

  • http://www.pluvinergy.com/ PluviAL

    What an excellent description. I plan to try it today.
    Everybody tells me the plant in the yard is Aloe Vera, how do I know it is not something else? An pointers? It’s reddish-green, and it is sticky-slippery, plump, and grows like a weed.
    Thanks

  • http://www.pluvinergy.com/ PluviAL

    One more question: Is one C mean 100th of a kilogram or 10 grams?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi PluviAl, there are hundreds of varieties of Aloe Vera and I don’t think they are all edible. Please do some research to make sure yours is an edible variety before trying to eat it. As for “c” it means “cup”. 1 US cup = 237ml.

      • http://www.pluvinergy.com/ PluviAL

        Thanks :)

Welcome!

I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques and give you the confidence and inspiration so that you can cook without recipes too!