Ramp kimchi & Ramp confit

Ramp Confit and Ramp Kimchi

So this weekend we made another trip north to pick ramps. This time we brought home a grocery bag brimming with these delightful members of the onion family (they’re sweet and have a flavor somewhere between leeks and garlic). The reason for this large harvest is that L had the brilliant idea of making ramp kimchi, and I wanted to make a ramp confit.

Kimchi, for those unfamiliar, is a fiery Korean side-dish that’s pickled in a potent mix of chili powder and garlic. The specifics and vegetables vary by region and season, but Korean families take pride in the number of urns of kimchi they prepare per year. Prior to winter, families would gather to pickle the last of fall’s vegetables to last them through the cold months until spring.

Confit on the other hand traces its roots to France before refrigeration where meats like duck and goose were cooked in their own fat to preserve them. The word is derived from the verb “confire” which quite literally means “to preserve” and can refer to fruits or vegetables as well as meat.

If you haven’t guessed by now, the common thread here is 2 ways to preserve these perishable gems so they last more than a few days. I figured it would be fun to employ methods coming from 2 continents, and the results were fantastic!

While ramps are a vegetable that aren’t available in Korea, they work perfectly for kimchi because of their strong (though not overpowering) garlic flavor. The long leaves are well suited for wrapping around a slice of steamed pork, or a bit of rice and the flavors just burst with spicy goodness in your mouth.

The confit on the other hand roasts the ramps in an ample amount of olive oil, rounding out the flavor and intensifying the sweetness. The olive oil it’s cooked in is redolent with ramp’s leeky garlicy aroma and is marvelous on pizza dough or bread.

Ramp Kimchi

1/3 C Red Chili pepper powder
1/3 C Myeolchi Aegjeot (Korean anchovy sauce)
1/3 C onion juice
1/4 C shredded daikon or carrots
5 scallions chopped
2 Tbs sesame seeds
1 Tbs sugar
1 Tbs corn syrup
1 tsp ginger powder

lots of ramps leaves separated and cleaned

Mix all the ingredients except the ramps in a bowl to combine. If you can’t find the “Korean anchovy sauce”, you can substitute 3 Tbs Thai fish sauce + 1 Tbs soy sauce. If you want to make this vegan, just replace the fish sauce with soy sauce.

Kimchi mix on ramp leaves
Lay down a layer of ramp leaves then paint a layer of the spice mixture on top. Repeat until your out of ramps.

Ramp Kimchi ready to ferment
Cover and refrigerate for about a week to fully pickle. These get better as they begin to ferment, so you can eat them for several weeks. When they start getting tart, this is the perfect time to turn it into Kimchi Jigae (kimchi stew).

Ramp Confit

lots of whole ramps cleaned
lots of EVOO
fresh ground black pepper
sea salt

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.

Lay the ramps in a baking dish sprinkling a bit of salt and pepper between each layer. Douse the whole thing with an ample amount of olive oil (you don’t want it swimming, but you want it to be covered in oil).

Roast for 15-20 minutes or until the ramps are completely wilted and any liquid that has come out has evaporated.

Eat on a crusty baguette, on a pizza or in a tart. These are also delicious blended into a vegetable soup (ramp and corn chowder anyone?).

  • http://www.hungryandfrozen.blogspot.com/ Laura @ Hungry and Frozen

    Those ramps that keep popping up in your posts sound so good. Love the idea of two different preservation methods. I bet the oil that they were confit(ed?) in would taste amazing after a while. Nice step-by-step photos :)

  • http://www.hungryandfrozen.blogspot.com Laura @ Hungry and Frozen

    Those ramps that keep popping up in your posts sound so good. Love the idea of two different preservation methods. I bet the oil that they were confit(ed?) in would taste amazing after a while. Nice step-by-step photos :)

  • http://www.teczcape.blogspot.com/ tigerfish

    Ramps are totally new to me! Thanks for sharing.

  • http://www.teczcape.blogspot.com tigerfish

    Ramps are totally new to me! Thanks for sharing.

  • http://cannelle-vanille.blogspot.com/ Aran

    I forgot, it is ramp season!!! Very intrigued by the kimchi version…

  • http://cannelle-vanille.blogspot.com/ Aran

    I forgot, it is ramp season!!! Very intrigued by the kimchi version…

  • http://www.tartelette.blogspot.com/ Tartelette

    Stop it with the ramp already!!! This is killing me…I need to call my secret food agent and figure out where to get some…somewhere!! The kimchi looks wonderful!

  • http://www.tartelette.blogspot.com Tartelette

    Stop it with the ramp already!!! This is killing me…I need to call my secret food agent and figure out where to get some…somewhere!! The kimchi looks wonderful!

  • http://holybasil.wordpress.com/ Christine

    This is really fantastic. I really like garlic chive kim chi and this reminds me a bit of that. I can’t wait to try this.

  • http://holybasil.wordpress.com Christine

    This is really fantastic. I really like garlic chive kim chi and this reminds me a bit of that. I can’t wait to try this.

  • http://www.sugarbar.org/ diva

    interesting. garlic flavour?? gimme it! :D i’m missing kimchi quite a lot. seems like i’ll need to get some soon. x

  • http://www.sugarbar.org diva

    interesting. garlic flavour?? gimme it! :D i’m missing kimchi quite a lot. seems like i’ll need to get some soon. x

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05752371044060690705 cakewardrobe

    This looks totally wonderful! I <3 kimchi but never had ramp kimchi!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05752371044060690705 cakewardrobe

    This looks totally wonderful! I <3 kimchi but never had ramp kimchi!

  • http://weeknightgourmet.blogspot.com/ Ellie

    Very cool. I have been traipsing around in our woods looking for these, I know they are out there and I am determined to find some by this weekend! Out of curiosity, how long will they last as a confit?

  • http://weeknightgourmet.blogspot.com Ellie

    Very cool. I have been traipsing around in our woods looking for these, I know they are out there and I am determined to find some by this weekend! Out of curiosity, how long will they last as a confit?

  • http://closetcooking.blogspot.com/ Kevin

    Ramp kimchi sounds really interesting. I have only tried making cabbage kimchi so far.

  • http://closetcooking.blogspot.com/ Kevin

    Ramp kimchi sounds really interesting. I have only tried making cabbage kimchi so far.

  • marc

    Laura, the oil is fantastic, I’m actually thinking my next “preservation” project may be to steep some ramps in olive oil to infuse it.

    Thanks tigerfish and Aran.

    Tartelette, I did some digging for you and it looks like there are a few folks selling ramps on eBay:-)

    Christine, that’s actually what inspired this variation:-)

    Diva, it’s actually easier to make that it seems, give it a shot sometime.

    Thanks cakewardrobe!

    Ellie, I’ve found that they tend to grow near water if that’s any help. I’m honestly not sure how long they will last, but I’ve had mine in the fridge for a week and they’re still okay. Probably has a lot to do with how much olive oil they’re in and how much salt you add.

    Kevin, if you can find ramps up in Toronto (think you should be able to), give it a try.

  • marc

    Laura, the oil is fantastic, I’m actually thinking my next “preservation” project may be to steep some ramps in olive oil to infuse it.

    Thanks tigerfish and Aran.

    Tartelette, I did some digging for you and it looks like there are a few folks selling ramps on eBay:-)

    Christine, that’s actually what inspired this variation:-)

    Diva, it’s actually easier to make that it seems, give it a shot sometime.

    Thanks cakewardrobe!

    Ellie, I’ve found that they tend to grow near water if that’s any help. I’m honestly not sure how long they will last, but I’ve had mine in the fridge for a week and they’re still okay. Probably has a lot to do with how much olive oil they’re in and how much salt you add.

    Kevin, if you can find ramps up in Toronto (think you should be able to), give it a try.

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  • Sue

    Here in Va I have been blessed with an abundance of these wonderful (ramps,onions,garlic,leeks) we call them ramps here.

  • Sue

    Here in Va I have been blessed with an abundance of these wonderful (ramps,onions,garlic,leeks) we call them ramps here.

  • http://feedingmaybelle.blogspot.com/ feeding maybelle

    I made vegan ramp kimchi and finally posted it. After starting my plans, I found your recipe, though I did a fairly different one, you might want to take a look. Your hamachi looks excellent and makes me start thinking about how to use my kimchi.

  • http://feedingmaybelle.blogspot.com feeding maybelle

    I made vegan ramp kimchi and finally posted it. After starting my plans, I found your recipe, though I did a fairly different one, you might want to take a look. Your hamachi looks excellent and makes me start thinking about how to use my kimchi.

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  • Guest

    fyi, they have ramps in korea! its been around for a long time!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I think you might be referring to Allium Chinense which is found all around Asia. It has a similar bulb at the bottom, but the leaves are different. Ramps, or Allium tricoccum are native to North America (though their recent popularity has seen them spread to other parts of the world).

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