Parsley Pasta

Hi! I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques while giving you the confidence and inspiration to cook without recipes too!

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Parsley Pasta

Like pulling doves out of an empty top hat, this pasta is one of those "something from nothing" dishes that comes together like magic. It goes to show that your fridge can be virtually empty, save a scrap of cheese, a lonely egg, and some garnish and you can turn it into a wholesome meal that tastes as good as it looks.

For me, that something from nothing magic is what pasta is all about. Sure, those sugos and ragus can be tasty, but at the end of the day, how often do you have time to simmer a sauce for hours?

Parsley Pasta

Here are three key things to remember that will make or break this dish (as well as most simple pastas)

  1. Make sure the water you’re boiling your pasta in is adequately salted. Your pasta should taste lightly salted when it comes out of the water. This requires a lot more salt in the water than you might imagine, certainly more than the pinch that many people add. This above anything is the secret to a flavorful pasta, especially when you’re not covering it in sauce. Until you get a good sense of the amount of salt you need to add to the water, it would be best to get a spoon and taste the water once the salt has dissolved. It shouldn’t be quite as salty as seawater, but it should be saltier than a soup.
  2. The second thing is to cook the pasta al dente. I know that some people prefer their pasta soft, but in a sauceless pasta, the pasta IS the dish. Since there’s no meat or other substantial elements to give it texture, if you boil your pasta until mushy, you’ll have a mushy dish. Like any food, pasta continues to cook after you remove it from the heat source, so it’s important to drain it just before it’s perfect. For a 9 minute spaghetti, I usually drain it at 8 minutes and let it finish cooking as I toss it with the other ingredients.
  3. The last thing may sound really obvious, and I know I say it a lot, but use good ingredients. Without a sauce to gloss over the rough spots, the quality of each ingredient counts. In this case, the most important ingredient is the olive oil. Use one that is full bodied, yet smooth, something that you would enjoy dipping bread in.
Parsley Pasta

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12 ratings41250Print
  • Coursenoodles & pasta
  • Cuisineitalian
  • Servings2 servings
  • Cooking Time8 minutesPT0H8M
  • Preparation Time2 minutesPT0H2M
  • Total Time10 minutesPT0H10M


250 grams
Dried spaghetti
25 grams
Flat leaf parsley (just the leaves)
1/4 cup
Extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon
Olive oil
2 large
40 grams
Parmigiano-Reggiano (grated)


  1. Bring a pot of well salted water to a boil and boil the pasta until a bit before it's perfect.
  2. Wash and thoroughly dry the parsley before mincing it. Wet parsley tends to clump and will be hard to distribute evenly in the pasta.
  3. When the pasta is a few minutes away from being done, heat a pan and fry the eggs using 1 tablespoon of olive oil.
  4. When the pasta is done, drain it well, return it to the pot, and toss with 1/4 cup of olive oil. Add the minced parsley and toss to coat evenly.
  5. Add the cheese in a little bit at a time tossing between each addition. Save a little to garnish.
  6. To plate, put a layer of pasta down, top with a fried egg, and sprinkle some freshly ground black pepper, sea salt and cheese on top of the egg.

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