Tomato Nikujaga

Marc Matsumoto

Hi! I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques while giving you the confidence and inspiration to cook without recipes too!

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Nikujaga, or "meat and potatoes" is an easy family favorite in Japan. This modern take includes tomatoes which lends sweetness and flavor to the classic.

I've written about Nikujaga (肉じゃが), or "meat and potatoes" before, it's one of my favorite Japanese comfort foods and it's super easy to make. I recently stumbled across a way to make it even easier and tastier. A definite win-win!

The traditional way to make nikujaga is to simmer beef, potatoes, onions and carrots in dashi, a type of Japanese soup stock. It gives the dish the signature Japanese flavor with an intense umami and a mild smoky flavor from the dried bonito. While <a href="http://norecipes.com/recipe/dashi-recipe">making dashi</a> isn't hard, it does require some extra time. In this version, I've replaced the dashi with some extra sake and tomatoes: Tomato Nikujaga (トマト肉じゃが)!

Nikujaga means "meat and potatoes" in Japanese and is the name of this classic home-style stew that's ridiculously easy to make.

Yes, I know it sounds kind of crazy given how little tomatoes are used in Japanese cuisine, but both sake and tomatoes are loaded with glutamic acids, which gives this preparation an incredible amount of umami. As an added bonus, the tomatoes impart a mild sweetness and acidity that's a great counterpoint to the savory meat and creamy potatoes.

Tips to make it better:

By stir-frying the sugar with the beef, it helps the beef brown, while giving the braising liquid an earthy caramel flavor that goes beautifully with the potatoes. For the potatoes, although it's purely cosmetic, you can help keep the potatoes from crumbling by using a peeler or paring knife to bevel the cut edges so there are no hard edges on the pieces of potato. Like most stews, this one is always better the second day. If you decide to make this ahead and let it rest overnight, save the snap peas and add them in when you reheat the Nikujaga.

Beveling the edges of potatoes in Nikujaga prevents them from crumbling.
Tomato NikujagaI've written about Nikujaga (肉じゃが), or "meat and potatoes" before, it's one of my favorite Japanese comfort foods and it's super easy to make. I recently stumbled across a way to make it even easier and tastier. A definite win-win! The traditional way to make nikujaga is to simmer beef, potatoes, on...

Summary

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  • Courseentrée
  • Cuisinejapanese
  • Yield4 servings 4 servings
  • Cooking Time40 minutesPT0H40M
  • Preparation Time10 minutesPT0H10M
  • Total Time50 minutesPT0H50M

Ingredients

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2 teaspoons
Vegetable oil
2 tablespoons
Sugar
300 grams
Beef (sliced thinly)
360 grams
Potatoes (8 small potatoes, peeled and cut in half)
230 grams
Tomatoes (2 medium tomatoes, cut into wedges)
220 grams
Onion (1 small onion, sliced)
200 grams
Shirataki noodles (drained, rinsed , chopped)
170 grams
Carrots (1 large carrot, cut into large pieces)
1 cup
Sake
1/4 cup
Soy sauce
80 grams
Snap peas (sliced in half)

Steps

  1. Caramelizing sugar and beef for nikujaga
    Heat a pan large enough for all of the ingredients over medium high-heat until hot. Add the oil and sugar and swirl to coat. Add the beef and stir-fry until the beef is mostly cooked.
  2. Tomatoes, carrots, onions and potatoes added to nikujaga.
    Add the potatoes, tomatoes, onion, shirataki noodles, carrots, sake, and soy sauce. Bring to a boil.
  3. Tomato Nikujaga after simmering until the meat and potatoes are tender.
    Partially cover with a lid and turn down the heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Cook until the vegetables and meat are tender (about 50 minutes)
  4. Add the snap peas and cover and steam until they are bright green.

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