Tonkotsu Ramen

Tonkotsu Ramen Noodle Soup

This post may have been a year in the making, but I’ve been working on this tonkotsu ramen for the better part of the last decade. In case you haven’t been indoctrinated into the wonderful world of ramen, Tonkotsu broth is the Holly Grail of noodle soup broths. It’s thick, creamy and nearly white in color, from pork marrow bones that have been simmered to smithereens.

Given the availability of reasonably good frozen ramens, and the plethora of shops specializing in the one bowl meal, most sane people in Japan don’t undertake the challenge of making ramen at home from scratch. I don’t know if I’m just crazy or if it’s my fearless American spirit, but at some point in college, it occurred to me that I could make the one bowl wonder that got me through many an all-nighter… from scratch.

My first attempts were pale watery excuses for ramen. Actually, they were more like noodles in pork soup. Over the years, my attempts yielded broths that were too porky, too brown, or too canned-meat tasting. Eventually, I got the soup to a place where you could pass it off as ramen to the less experienced palette (which was when I started writing this post), but it never quite nailed the nuanced balance of meat, aromatics, and body.

Caramelized onions, ginger and garlic for tonkotsu soup

So how did I figure it out? During my recent trip to Japan, I had many bowls of ramen, each with its own distinct character and personality. Some used chicken stock, others included pork. I even had one ramen that was made of tuna stock. I think I was in the middle of a bowl of chicken consommé ramen with bacon, mozzarella and fried burdock on top when it occurred to me that perhaps limiting myself to a 100% pork broth wasn’t the right approach for the type of stock I was trying to create.

I had another epiphany at Ramen Stadium, in Fukuoka, where I hopped from restaurant to restaurant, gorging on Tonkotsu Ramen. Many of the broths had a dark oil that I’d always assumed was sesame oil. Upon closer inspection, some of the soups revealed caramelized bits of onion that were nearly burnt. The research of Louis Camille Maillard came to mind and I realized that a lot of the nuances in the broth were not coming from the meat, but from the caramelized aromatics in the broth.

Back at home, with bags of chicken and pork bones in hand, I set to work recreating the flavours and memories while they were still fresh in my mind. And the results? Well, let’s just say I won’t be standing in line for hours outside Ippudo this winter. To say it’s better than Ippudo’s would be a strech, but does it make your lips sticky with collagen? Yes! Does it have little creamy nibbles of pork fat floating in the broth? Certainly! Does it put a big grin on your face when the steaming bowl is set in front of you? Hell yea!

Tonkotsu Ramen Broth

Mission accomplished.

The toppings are up to you, but I usually go with the standards like chashu, menma , woodear and scallions. If you want some chashu similar to Santouka Ramen’s Toroniku, here’s a recipe for my version. To give a Kagoshima flair, I finish each bowl, with a drizzle of mayu (black garlic oil). It’s technically burt garlic and it’s not something you’d want to eat alone, but mixed into tonkotsu ramen, it’s divine!

Tonkotsu Ramen with pork, corn and bok choy

This recipe makes enough Tonkotsu base for 6-8 bowls of ramen (depending on how much water you add), and the Tonkotsu Ramen recipe below makes 2 bowls.

Next, I need to find some kansui so I can tackle the noodle making as I’m not super happy with the noodles I get in Chinatown.

Equipment you'll need:

Tonkotsu Base

makes 10-12 cups of stock

2 pig trotters, cut in half lengthwise
1.5 pounds pork leg bone, cut into several pieces
1.5 pounds chicken bones

oil for deep frying
2″ knob of ginger sliced thin
1 small head garlic trimmed but whole
1 teaspoon cracked white pepper
1 large onion sliced thinly

Fill a pressure cooker 2/3rds of the way with water and bring to a boil. Add the pig trotters to the boiling water and cook until you stop seeing red blood come out of the bones (about 10-15 minutes). The idea is to draw out as much of the gunk as possible into this first batch of water. Transfer the trotters to a bowl of cold water then repeat with the leg bones and chicken bones (you can use the same water).

Dump the now very dirty water down the drain and wash the pot. Scrub any dark brown scrum off all the bones and rinse them thoroughly. Return the cleaned bones to the pot and cover with water (the water should come up an inch above the top of the bones). Bring the pot to a boil and skim off any chunks or foam that floats to the surface. Keep doing this until you don’t seen any more foam or scum floating up. This will take about 30 minutes.

While the bones are going, Heat 1/2″ of oil in a pot over medium heat and add the head of garlic and ginger. Fry this until they are browned and shriveled up. Use a slotted or wire mesh to transfer the ginger and garlic to a bowl. Add the onions to the oil and fry these until caramelized and shriveled. Add the fried onions to the ginger and garlic and set aside.

Once the stock is scum-free, add the caramelized ginger, garlic, and onions to the stock. Affix the pressure cooker lid and cook on high pressure for 1 hour and 45 minutes. If you don’t have a pressure cooker, cover with a lid and cook for 5 hours (you may need to check and add water periodically, the bones should be mostly covered in water).

Once the pressure is released use tongs to remove and discard all the bones. Remove any chunks of pork and set aside for another use. Strain the stock into a bowl and skim off any excess fat.

Mayu (black garlic oil)

1/4 cup sesame oil
5 cloves of garlic grated

To make the black garlic oil, add the sesame oil into a small saucepan along with the grated garlic. Put the pan over medium low heat and let the garlic cook stirring occasionally until it is very dark brown. When the garlic is very dark, turn the heat down to low and let it cook until it is black.

As soon as it hits black, turn off the heat and transfer the hot oil and garlic to a heatproof bowl. Let this mixture cool down completely. Add the cooled oil to a blender or food processor and blitz until there are no visible garlic particles left and the oil is uniformly black.

It will taste burnt and slightly bitter, but this is okay as you only add a little bit to each bowl. Put it the oil in a container and refrigerate until you are ready to use it.

Tonkotsu Ramen

makes 2 bowls
for soup
3 cups tonkotsu base (from recipe above)
1 tablespoon tahini
1 tablespoon strained braising liquid from chashu
2 cloves garlic, finely grated (not pressed)
1-2 teaspoons kosher salt (to taste)
1 teaspoon mirin
1/8 teaspoon white pepper
1 tablespoon sesame seeds coarsely ground
2 tablespoons finely minced fatback (salted pork fat)

to serve
1/2 batch homemade ramen noodles
2 teaspoons mayu (from recipe above)
sliced chashu
2 scallions finely chopped
other optional toppings include menma, woodear, egg, bean sprouts, corn, etc..

Heat the tonkotsu base in a sauce pan. In a bowl whisk together the tahini, chashu liquid, grated garlic, salt, mirin and white pepper. Add this to the hot broth and whisk to combine. Taste and adjust salt as needed. Bring to a simmer, then add the sesame seeds and pork fat and whisk to combine.

Split the cooked noodles between two bowls. Pour the tonkotsu soup over the noodles. Top with chashu, scallions and whatever else you want to add. Finish the ramen with a drizzle of mayu on each bowl.

Update: There have been a couple people who have had problems with the original recipe and in speaking with them, I think there are a few points I should clarify:

  1. To get the creamy white soup it’s important that you use pork leg bones and the trotters. The white color comes from the marrow and collagen in these parts. Using other types of pork bones such as ribs or neck bones will not give your soup the richness or color.
  2. Don’t omit the fatback (salted pork fat). Most of the fat from the stock gets skimmed out, and the fat added at the last minute is what gives the soup it’s rich “sticky” quality. By whisking small bits of minced fatback in at the end, you create an emulsion of soup and fat, so it makes the soup nice and creamy without being greasy. If you’re having a hard time finding it, try asking for it at a butcher.
  3. The onions should be a deep brown, but they should not be burnt, if they are browning unevenly, turn the heat down, so they brown more slowly.
  4. Tahini is not the same as toasted sesame paste. It should be light beige in color and have a thick pourable consistency. If your grocery store doesn’t carry it, try finding a Middle Eastern or Indian grocery store. I use a brand called “Al Wadi” that comes in a plastic container with a green label and lid and has a relatively mellow flavor. If you can’t get tahini you can also grind your own sesame seeds until you have something resembling runny peanut butter.
  5. Salt has different levels of salinity depending on the type and brand. Even amongst kosher salt, Morton’s for example is much more salty than Diamond Crystal (which I use). Most recipes deliberately go low on the amount of salt you should use so you don’t accidentally over salt your dish. If you feel like it needs more salt, by all means, add more salt.
  • MLe

    Wow!!! I am so in love with ramen but sadly am unable to find anything remotely authentic to what I had in Japan where I am in the US. I am so glad you undertook the difficult task of trying to brew up some of this delicious stock so the rest of us may have an easier time recreating those wonderful ramen slurping memories. Thanks!!!

  • MLe

    Wow!!! I am so in love with ramen but sadly am unable to find anything remotely authentic to what I had in Japan where I am in the US. I am so glad you undertook the difficult task of trying to brew up some of this delicious stock so the rest of us may have an easier time recreating those wonderful ramen slurping memories. Thanks!!!

  • http://www.twitter.com/eatdrinklove amy

    Hi Marc, this is awesome. I’ve always been curious about how this (ramen) was made. Thank you for sharing this : )

  • http://www.twitter.com/eatdrinklove amy

    Hi Marc, this is awesome. I’ve always been curious about how this (ramen) was made. Thank you for sharing this : )

  • http://www.foodgal.com/ Carolyn Jung

    My husband will kiss the ground you walk on. This is one of his fave things in the world. I want to just slurp up a giant bowl of this right now.

  • http://www.foodgal.com Carolyn Jung

    My husband will kiss the ground you walk on. This is one of his fave things in the world. I want to just slurp up a giant bowl of this right now.

  • http://souvlakiforthesoul.com/ Peter G

    The best ramen I had was in Honolulu! After a heavy night of drinking it was the perfect cure. I still remember the taste! Marc it looks like your quest for the perfect ramen has been fulfilled. If I ever get adventurous I’m sure to look it up and give it a go. All the best for 2010…It was a real pleasure meeting you later this year.

  • http://souvlakiforthesoul.com Peter G

    The best ramen I had was in Honolulu! After a heavy night of drinking it was the perfect cure. I still remember the taste! Marc it looks like your quest for the perfect ramen has been fulfilled. If I ever get adventurous I’m sure to look it up and give it a go. All the best for 2010…It was a real pleasure meeting you later this year.

  • http://freshlocalandbest.blogspot.com/ Christine @Fresh Local and Bes

    If it’s close to Ippudo’s ramen then its definitely worth a try. I’ve never made ramen at home, but will be making this one soon.

  • http://freshlocalandbest.blogspot.com Christine @Fresh Local and Best

    If it’s close to Ippudo’s ramen then its definitely worth a try. I’ve never made ramen at home, but will be making this one soon.

  • http://www.foodieindenial.com/ Foodie in Denial

    Congratulations! Now there’s an accomplishment to truly let you know that 2009 was a successful year!

  • http://www.foodieindenial.com Foodie in Denial

    Congratulations! Now there’s an accomplishment to truly let you know that 2009 was a successful year!

  • jk2001

    WOW. This is a real revelation.

  • jk2001

    WOW. This is a real revelation.

  • http://noobcook.com/ noobcook

    wow this recipe is many years in the making – no wonder the result looks restaurant quality. The broth looks really rich and your ramen is so beautiful. Happy 2010! =)

  • http://noobcook.com noobcook

    wow this recipe is many years in the making – no wonder the result looks restaurant quality. The broth looks really rich and your ramen is so beautiful. Happy 2010! =)

  • http://dodol-mochi.blogspot.com/ Pei-Lin

    Thanks for sharing the insight into the making of a good bowl of ramen! Here’s to wish a great year in 2010!!! Happy New Year!

  • http://dodol-mochi.blogspot.com/ Pei-Lin

    Thanks for sharing the insight into the making of a good bowl of ramen! Here’s to wish a great year in 2010!!! Happy New Year!

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com/ pigpigscorner

    Definitely making this! Happy New Year!

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com pigpigscorner

    Definitely making this! Happy New Year!

  • http://drfugawe.wordpress.com/ drfugawe

    Congrats on the level of your dedication. I know the quandary of saving your best posts until they’re perfect; I’ve got 5-6 patiently waiting! Beautiful job.

    I’m looking forward to the upcoming noodle post – I think noodles are perhaps the most “avoided” area among home made foods, even though they are so loved.

  • http://drfugawe.wordpress.com/ drfugawe

    Congrats on the level of your dedication. I know the quandary of saving your best posts until they’re perfect; I’ve got 5-6 patiently waiting! Beautiful job.

    I’m looking forward to the upcoming noodle post – I think noodles are perhaps the most “avoided” area among home made foods, even though they are so loved.

  • http://deltakitchen.blogspot.com/ Andreas

    Congratulations on achieving the Tonkotsu Grail. :)
    May there be many bowls of ramen in 2010.
    Happy New Year.

  • http://deltakitchen.blogspot.com/ Andreas

    Congratulations on achieving the Tonkotsu Grail. :)
    May there be many bowls of ramen in 2010.
    Happy New Year.

  • http://cookingbytheseatofmypants.com/ Jerry (CBSOP)

    Oh I so have to try this one. That is indeed the Holy Grail of soups. I’m glad you decided to tackle it and bing us along for the ride

  • http://cookingbytheseatofmypants.com Jerry (CBSOP)

    Oh I so have to try this one. That is indeed the Holy Grail of soups. I’m glad you decided to tackle it and bing us along for the ride

  • http://tastewiththeeyes.blogspot.com/ Lori Lynn

    Sounds amazing. I like your choice of toppings too. Very colorful.
    Happy New Year Marc!
    LL

  • http://tastewiththeeyes.blogspot.com/ Lori Lynn

    Sounds amazing. I like your choice of toppings too. Very colorful.
    Happy New Year Marc!
    LL

  • http://closetcooking.blogspot.com/ Kevin

    That is one nice looking ramen! Great tips for making the broth!

  • http://closetcooking.blogspot.com/ Kevin

    That is one nice looking ramen! Great tips for making the broth!

  • http://kitchenocd.wordpress.com/ Tiffany

    Oh that looks fantastic! Thank you for taking the arduous journey to Japan and forcing yourself to try every food available. I know it was probably very hard, but just think about how happy you’ve made your readers :P

  • http://kitchenocd.wordpress.com Tiffany

    Oh that looks fantastic! Thank you for taking the arduous journey to Japan and forcing yourself to try every food available. I know it was probably very hard, but just think about how happy you’ve made your readers :P

  • John

    Unbelievable – just stumbled across this on a web search and it’s exactly what I’m looking for. Thanks so much for taking the time!

  • John

    Unbelievable – just stumbled across this on a web search and it’s exactly what I’m looking for. Thanks so much for taking the time!

  • http://www.pastrychefonline.com/ Jenni

    In honor of this post, a haiku:

    Marc, ever dauntless
    Seeks Tonkotsu perfection
    And shares with his friends.

  • http://www.pastrychefonline.com/ Jenni

    In honor of this post, a haiku:

    Marc, ever dauntless
    Seeks Tonkotsu perfection
    And shares with his friends.

  • http://www.openkyoto.com/ Michael [KyotoFoodie]

    Man, you are the super foodie! A touch crazy, I do think (In the right way, of course!) I think I would like to try making ramen broth, but maybe not. You inspire me.

    How was tuna stock, and where did you have it? The ramen with bacon, mozzarella and fried burdock is pretty great, I think. But tonkotsu is the real deal.

    Cook on, Marc!

  • http://www.openkyoto.com Michael [KyotoFoodie]

    Man, you are the super foodie! A touch crazy, I do think (In the right way, of course!) I think I would like to try making ramen broth, but maybe not. You inspire me.

    How was tuna stock, and where did you have it? The ramen with bacon, mozzarella and fried burdock is pretty great, I think. But tonkotsu is the real deal.

    Cook on, Marc!

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com/ katiek@ kitchensidecar

    congratulations on the herculean effort. tampopo would be proud.

    i love posts that i spend time thinking through and editing. sometimes it isn’t straight to press for my recipes. I am nursing a xiaolongbao redux recipe, culling the texture of skins and flavors, consulting others, in order to rpoduce something i love.
    hats off.

  • http://kitchensidecar.blogspot.com katiek@ kitchensidecar

    congratulations on the herculean effort. tampopo would be proud.

    i love posts that i spend time thinking through and editing. sometimes it isn’t straight to press for my recipes. I am nursing a xiaolongbao redux recipe, culling the texture of skins and flavors, consulting others, in order to rpoduce something i love.
    hats off.

  • http://kissmyspatula.com/ my spatula

    fantastic! a goal to make homemade ramen has been on my radar for AGES. now, i must learn to make the noodles.

  • http://kissmyspatula.com/ my spatula

    fantastic! a goal to make homemade ramen has been on my radar for AGES. now, i must learn to make the noodles.

  • KB

    Thank you!! Besides okonomiyaki (Hiroshima-style), tonkotsu ramen was a food staple to me during my time in Japan. Now back home in the States, I’ve been able to reasonably replicate many of my Japanese favorites with the glaring exception of tonkotsu ramen (and yes: once you’ve eaten ramen in Japan, you will never – EVER – eat one of those instant packs again!). Thanks again for the time and effort. I can’t wait to set aside a weekend to attempt it. :)

  • KB

    Thank you!! Besides okonomiyaki (Hiroshima-style), tonkotsu ramen was a food staple to me during my time in Japan. Now back home in the States, I’ve been able to reasonably replicate many of my Japanese favorites with the glaring exception of tonkotsu ramen (and yes: once you’ve eaten ramen in Japan, you will never – EVER – eat one of those instant packs again!). Thanks again for the time and effort. I can’t wait to set aside a weekend to attempt it. :)

  • betty

    This looks amazing thanks so much for sharing!!!! I think my record for waiting for this meal at Ippudo was 2 hours, so I can’t wait try this recipe and make SIX portions for the same wait! :)

    This seems like a stupid question, but any advice on the best way to get the chicken bones? Surely there must be an easier way than deboning multiple chickens….

    • marc

      I get chicken bones in chinatown for about $0.50 a pound. If you don’t live somewhere with a chinatown, you can try asking your local butcher or the meat section of a grocery store to set bones aside for you (they have to remove the bones to make the boneless thighs and breasts). Hope that helps

  • betty

    This looks amazing thanks so much for sharing!!!! I think my record for waiting for this meal at Ippudo was 2 hours, so I can’t wait try this recipe and make SIX portions for the same wait! :)

    This seems like a stupid question, but any advice on the best way to get the chicken bones? Surely there must be an easier way than deboning multiple chickens….

    • marc

      I get chicken bones in chinatown for about $0.50 a pound. If you don’t live somewhere with a chinatown, you can try asking your local butcher or the meat section of a grocery store to set bones aside for you (they have to remove the bones to make the boneless thighs and breasts). Hope that helps

  • Tim H

    I've been searching the web for a while for a great tonkotsu recipe, and this is it! Brilliant post, thanks for the inspiration.

  • http://grazingrace.com/ grazingrace

    WOW! i am a big ramen lover and i did try making my own. but like you said, they were all bowls of pale watery concoctions. gave up after a while and decided to concentrate eating them, but your post just rekindled my fire to try again! :P

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=10706809 facebook-10706809

    I spent 8 hours last night making my 3rd attempt at tonkotsu ramen. The soup by itself was ok, but mixed with the buta kakuni sauce, it was surprisingly good. I want to give your recipe a shot, as I didn't use chicken stock (added a little fish sauce tho, and dashi). Im curious tho, was it hard getting pork leg/thigh bones? I called a butcher and they said they're hard to come by. I used neck bones and a pretty big section of pig foot. Hit me back, I'd love some pointers!

  • eatingclubvancouverjs

    I'm going to try this tonkotsu broth — thanks! Maybe we'll have a ramen party in the near future. . .

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  • Cklasse

    I just tried and eaten my ramen using this recipe but it failed miserably. I must have done something wrong along the way.

    Why is my soup brown in colour when yours is cream? Have I caramelised the onions too much?
    Why is the soup kind of bland? Is it because I did not put enough pork?

  • norecipes

    Sorry to hear it didn't work out for you:( If your soup turned out brown, there's a couple things that may have happend. The brown colour typically comes from impurities in the meat, which you need to get rid of during the first boil (where you throw the water out) or during the boiling and skimming phase. The lid to the pressure cooker should not be sealed until you stop seeing impurities floating to the surface (foam and clumps of blood). It's also worth noting that the soup will still be a light tan colour and won't look milky until you whisk in the tahini and pork fat.

    As far as the flavour, the only thing I can think of is that your pressure cooker may be different than mine and takes longer to extract all the flavour from the bones. When your soup was done and you strained it, do you remember if the bones were crumbly? If you cooked it long enough, both the pork and chicken bones should break apart easily in your hand. The tonkotsu base should be very rich and almost sticky in your mouth before adding any of the flavourings in the the ramen recipe.

  • Lee

    I do endeavour to make this at home myself as I have recently discovered what I 'think' is this dish whilst living in Beijing!
    Is there a tonkotsu base that one can buy – cheating and completely a convenience product I know, but until I source necessary ingredients it may help stave off my cravings!
    I have only had this dish at a 'fast food' type place here and am now on a mission to find the 'real deal' here in Beijing! Any tips let me know…..

  • norecipes

    If you have a store near you that sells Japanese products you should be able
    to find “tonkotsu ramen” in the refrigerated (or frozen) food section. They
    come complete with noodles and soup base and are pretty good (often better
    than the fast food places), but they're not the same as making the stock
    yourself.

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  • jlai

    can i use something other than a pressure cooker? i don't have access to one, but would like to attempt making this.

  • norecipes

    Sure, you can cook it over the stove in a regular stock pot with a
    lid. You just need to triple the cooking time (6 hours instead of 2).
    You'll also probably need to add extra water as it will evaporate
    faster from a regular pot.

  • m-ashley

    Does the tonkatsu base freeze well. I dont do a lot of cooking, but would love homemade ramen on occasion. I'd like to make a big batch and just thaw portions when i am ready to make soup.

  • norecipes

    Yep, it freezes just fine. I often make a big batch and portion it out
    and freeze it.

  • ramen neko ^~^

    Yes ! Tonkotsu (home-made) passion rekindled after reading this ! Thank you. What pressure cooker do you own ? I should at least be using the same tools ^~^

  • norecipes

    I have a generic pressure cooker with 2 pressure settings (low and
    high). It shouldn't really matter too much, though depending on how
    much pressure your cooker can handle it the cooking time may vary. The
    idea is to cook the bones long enough so you can break them easily
    with your fingers. If they don't, just put the lid back on and keep
    cooking it.

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  • Swoeng

    I just moved back to the states having lived in Tokyo for the last two years and haven't had any success with finding a decnt ramen-ya near me. I tried your recipe for the first tine today and tested it out with my foodie friends and they absolutely loved it! I paired up the tonkatsu ramen with your buta kakuni recipe. I can't thank you enough for posting the recipe! When I now have ramen cravings I now can reach into my fridge for the broth recipe.

    • Blueluna4jam

      If you live in NYC there is this great noodle shop in china town called Ajisan Noodles. Its on Mott street (sorry don’t recall the actual address but it wont be hard to find).

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  • Ushito

    THIS IS PERFECT :)

  • noodles

    i had the same problems. my broth turned out pretty brown. i think i might have caramelized the onions too long. i only fried the onions and garlic for about 20 min and they were almost burnt. i skimmed the impurities out completely too.

    i think i spent a total of 8 hours simmering the broth but it still turned out really bland. :( i don’t know what i did wrong.

  • C Hosano

    nice.. i think you should make a video for this..

  • steb

    I’m in college right now, and for some reason during one of my lectures, I had the greatest burning desire to make a bowl of true ramen. I am so excited to have found a base recipe to get started with.

  • Koji

    wow this is amazing. I live in San Diego and there are so few places that serve good tonkotsu ramen, let alone good ramen in general. I’ve been trying to come up with a chyashyu ramen with a natto flavored soup base, but not much luck. Have any ideas of where to start?

  • http://twitter.com/ramenbackpacker The Ramen Backpacker

    Hi,

    I’ve been using this recipe for a few years now. I found it online after a few failed attempts at using a recipe for Tonkotsu that some friends from Japan gave me. Slurping the broth that this recipe makes takes me right back to a bowl of noodles I ate in a Ramen shop under Fukuoka station a few years back. Just perfect.

    I often debate with my wife the nutritional value (if any) of a bowl of Ramen. So to end the controversy, I decided to enter your recipe into the About.com Calorie Counter. I’m unsure in regards to this site’s credibility amongst the diet industry, although I used it a few years ago when I was trying to loose weight.

    The results are here: http://theramenbackpacker.blogspot.com/2010/10/how-nutritional-is-ramen.html

    Based on a (meagre) serving of 319g, the calorie counter offered some unsurprising results including 2353mg of salt per serve, and a saturated fat rating of 25 per cent.

    What shocked me was the actual calorie count. The results showed, a serve of your Tonkotsu Ramen is only 397 calories. So in theory a serve of ramen can quite comfortably fit into a daily diet of 1500 calories. Diet Ramen!

  • Noodles

    Making the base/stock wasn’t easy.

    Thanks for sharing the Tonkotsu Ramen recipe. I have been looking for an authentic ramen recipe online, which wasn’t easy to find.

    Therefore, I am giving your recipe a try. The stock is currently cooking my kitchen for about 3 hours. It smell delicious, however, the stock still looks clear and NOT MILKY (uuurggggh) :-S. I think I am looking for a 2nd trial. I think my mistake might because I use the hip bone. Not quite happy with the result…..but, haven’t yet giving up.

    Arigato Gozaimasu

    • Anonymous

      The milky color comes from the marrow and collagen in the leg bones, other
      bones will get you good stock, but it will not have the same color/flavor.
      I’ve also started adding the pig feet (trotters) to the base as well, which
      makes the soup very creamy.

  • Timothychanchihim

    i would like to ask that when you say drain the garlic and onion and put it into the base, do you mean to drain into the soup and discard the onion and garlic? or drain the oil and put the onion and garlic into the soup? thx

    • Anonymous

      Use a slotted spoon to drain the oil from the onions and garlic then
      add it to the soup.

  • Timothychanchihim

    i think i caramelize my onions too much that the base is not white but little too brownish… oh well gotta try harder, thx for the recipie anyways

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  • http://twitter.com/khursten khursten

    Dear Marc,

    I have been craving for the flavor of Ippudo’s tonkotsu ramen ever since I left Osaka last August. I do have a question, in the absence of tahini, do you have a substitute? What does tahini do to the flavor of tonkotsu? It’s a rare ingredient here in Manila so I was wondering if it makes an entire difference or if I can use a substitute.

    • Anonymous

      If you can get toasted sesame seeds you could make it yourself. Tahini
      is basically sesame seeds that have been ground into a butter (like
      peanut butter). I’ve used peanut butter in a pinch, but it’s much
      better if you can just grind your own sesame seeds with a mortar and
      pestle. As for what it does to the soup, it adds creamy body, richness
      and a nutty flavor. I hope that helps!

      • Anonymous

        Thanks a lot! I appreciate it. I believe I like the idea of having to make my own tahini (and from the looks of it, it’s cost effective too.)

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  • Michael [KyotoFoodie]

    Mission accomplished, indeed!!

    This looks excellent and I *think* I want to try it someday. Well, no, I am absolutely sure that I want to, and *think* that I actually will. It is quite a project.

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  • stephen

    You are a hero

  • Maztec

    Do you think cow bones would work instead of pig bones? Wife won’t eat pork, but this looks so wonderfully delicious.

    • Anonymous

      Tonkotsu ramen is always made with pork (“ton” means pork in Japanese). That
      said, in Korea there’s a soup called Sulong Tang that’s made with a white
      beef marrow broth that’s quite good. Making broth out of beef marrow bones
      could make for a very unique ramen, though you might want to change the
      seasonings to take advantage of the characteristics of a beef stock.

      • Maztec

        Thanks! That is a great tip. Perhaps I can find a delicious hybrid of this. When I get around to it, if it’s any good, I will try to remember to come back and comment!

      • Nisalarasati

        The recipe looks great! I took up the challenge for making successful ramen as my Japanese friend told me it’s almost impossible. However, pork is not really my favourite. Do you have other suggestions other than tonkotsu broth (or cow)? Maybe with chicken or fish and just taste as good? And if I am to use cow bone marrow, what kind of the seasonings you think would compliment the beefy taste? Thanks!

  • http://ifyouforgetme.wordpress.com/ Steffi Fermazi

    I will definitely try this. Someday. At least not here in Saudi Arabia. ;)
    But it looks so delicious and (most of all) doable!

  • http://www.zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal ZenKimchi

    I dream of that ramen in Fukuoka. I noticed that in their bubbling cauldron they had pig skulls, and when they pulled them up, they disintegrated like wet cardboard.

    • Anonymous

      That makes sense, the skulls have a lot of collagen, but you should be able
      to get the same creaminess by using trotters.

  • Starboltkid

    Question…in your recipe above for making the ramen…it says to mix the tahini, chashu liquid, etc….with water, but it doesn;t have the amount of water listed in ingredients…How much water do you use? I made everything last night and the soup base yielded 3 cups…only enough for two people. So, I am wondering ( haven;t tasted it yet) if it is concentrated and more water can be added without compromising taste. Thank you SO much for putting this recipe up. I lived in nagoya for 9 years and Ippudo was a twice weekly visit for me. Miss it!

    • Anonymous

      Hi, sorry about that, the water in the directions was a hold-over from an
      earlier iteration of the recipe (before I added the chashu braising liquid).
      Did you make the soup base in a pressure cooker? If not, it’s possible that
      your soup has reduced too much while cooking. Were the bones still covered
      in liquid when it was finished? The tonkotsu base recipe should yield about
      10-12 cups of stock (assuming you made the full recipe), so you should be
      able to add some water to your stock.

      • Starboltkid

        thank you. No, I didn;t have a pressure cooker. What you said is exactly what happened…We shall see how it goes. Again, I truly appreciate you puttin gthis recipe out there for all of us who miss the tate of Delicious tonkatsu ramen.

  • James

    Thanks so much for this recipe. I live in Australia and to find any decent ramen, not to mention tonkotsu ramen, is near impossible. I became hooked on Tonkotsu ramen after living in Fukuoka and getting a taste for its mouth watering broth, so it seems I have no choice but to recreate the experience at home. I was wondering for the home-made ramen noodles, is there an alternative to mixing the ingredients for the dough if you don’t have a mixer? Thanks again :-)

    • Anonymous

      Where in Australia are you? It’s been a long time, but I recall
      getting some descent ramen in Sydney. As for the dough, you can hand
      knead everything together.

      • James

        Do you remember the name of the place in sydney? I’m about 3 hours from there in Canberra – its the capital but its such a small town. It seems even the places that do serve ramen rarely have tonkotsu in my experience. Its more miso ramen or shoyu ramen. Maybe the porky flavor isn’t to everyone’s taste!

        • Anonymous

          Nope, by a long time I’m talking 15+ years. There are a ton of food
          bloggers both in Sydney and Melbourne though, perhaps one of them
          might know of a good place.

        • Amanda

          Try Ryo’s in Sydney’s Crows Nest.

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  • Annesue

    I am rather curious about trying to make this, and I’m rather curious as to how to go about it if I want to use the pig’s head as a base for the stock.

    Would I need to draw out the gunk the same way as the trotters, or do I just start boiling it straight away and would I need to remove the brain if it’s still attached??

    I know you haven’t posted a recipe with it, but I’m curious as to how you would have gone about it!

    Kind regards and I can’t wait to try out this amazing looking recipe!

    • Anonymous

      I’ve never worked with a pig head before so I’m honestly not sure what
      to do with the brain. That said, you will definitely need to draw out
      the gunk as you would with any other cut of meat that has blood in it.
      You could also probably leave out the trotters, but I would not omit
      the leg bones. I’m assuming that a pig head is going to weigh
      significantly more than 1.5 pounds, so you’ll also need to do the math
      to figure out how you need to change the ratio of other ingredients.
      Hope that helps.

  • joe

    This is beautiful! How long do you think the gelatinous stock will last in the fridge/freezer/through multiple reheats?

    • Anonymous

      Thanks! I wouldn’t reheat the base stock, just use as much as you need
      at a time. For freezing, I usually portion out serving size amounts
      into tupperware and freeze, should last for months frozen. As for the
      fridge, it should keep for about a week.

  • Jacob Estes

    I read this recipe a few weeks ago, and thought it was interesting, but didn’t really make any plans to actually make it. Then, I was browsing a grocery store I haven’t been to in a couple years and noticed they have pig’s feet packaged up with the other meat. I’ve never seen them raw like that!

    Anyway, I’ve never made stock or broth before (well, not for the purpose of having broth), and so this is a lot of firsts for me. It’s on the stove as I type this, and so far it’s looking good.

    Thanks!

  • Skye

    I’ve been going nuts trying to find the bones for this. Where/how on earth do you acquire a pound and a half of chicken bones? Will chicken backs work? And I can’t pork leg bones, either. Any idea how many pounds of pork shanks would translate to enough bones?

    • Anonymous

      Do you have a butcher in town (not at a supermarket)? They should have a
      supply of bones from the chickens they debone. As for the pork, butchers
      should also have those too. They most likely won’t have them on display
      since it’s not really something people usually buy, but if you ask them,
      they should be able to set some aside for you the next time they butchering
      chickens/pig. Pork shanks should work, but how much meat is on them? You
      really want the bones more than the meat. If you have a Chinatown near you a
      Chinese butcher should have no problem getting you what you need (the might
      even have them out in the case).

  • mcouperide

    For New Years Day 2011 I decided to try out this ramen recipe, including the homemade noodles. I spent four hours yesterday gathering all the ingredients (most difficult to find was the kansui for the noodles – I drove to four different Asian stores to find it. I never did find the pork cheek for the chashu), and five hours today standing in the kitchen cooking everything. My wife thought I had gone nuts (she is herself a fantastic gourmet chef and does all the cooking, usually. I realize now that I am soooo lucky).
    Considering I spent 9 hours gathering stuff and and preparing two bowls of ramen, it did ocurr to me that we could have driven up to New York (from suburban DC), stand in line at Ippudo Ramen, and driven back, probably in the same or less time.
    My resulting ramen was a respectable accomplishment for a first attempt. Maybe not quite as savory and robust as Ippudo, but actually more healthy-tasting, and pretty damn good tasting at that. Even my wife was impressed.
    I pretty much followed your suggested recipes for everything, including the mayu. I have some ideas for modifications the next time I venture to try again. But thank you for your recipes; they are spot on!

    • Anonymous

      Awesome glad to hear it. It is time consuming, but you can freeze the
      leftover tonkotsu base, so the next few bowls shouldn’t take you quite as
      long:-) The recipe is still evolving on my end so I’d love to hear what you
      do with it next time!

  • sawuontheflipside

    Hey,

    Thanks a lot for your recipe, and the site. Been reading for a while and it’s been a great source of inspiration. I made my first batch of the year at the weekend following your recipe fairly closely. One thing though, I still couldn’t get the broth to be as white as it is in your pictures, or as I remember Tonkotsu being when I lived in Japan. Is the whiteness really just down to the bones? If so i’m a bit confused as to what went wrong… the soup was more brownish, as it’s been before when I made purely pork bone soups (I have an unhealthy fascination with Ramen Jiro, which is a Tokyo version of Tonkotsu heavy on pork bones and garlic).

    Anyways, if you have any tips/advice on getting the soup white it’d be appreciated but apart from that thanks a lot. Definitely the best batch I’ve made so far and definitely gonna continue to interpret your recipes with the left over soup ;)

    Here’s a post on it http://www.lo-la.co.uk/2011/01/10/the-first-ramen-batch-of-2011/

    Be well

    Lo

  • Anonymous

    Hi Lo, what kind of pork bones did you use? If you included pork trotters
    (the feet) the stock should have been pretty white before you added
    anything. Also, from your post it sounds like you omitted the tahini and fat
    back. Both those ingredients add to the whiteness of the stock. You should
    be able to get tahini in any middle eastern grocery store. If you can’t you
    can make your own by grinding toasted sesame seeds with a mortar and pestle
    until it forms a smooth paste. As for the fatback, you can just use raw pork
    fat, but it’s essential that it has not been cooked (once its cooked most of
    the fat has rendered out and it will not give you the creamy mouthfeel ramen
    is supposed to have).

    • Anonymous

      Hey Marc,

      Yeah i had to omit the tahini and i used cooked fat back, so that might explain it! Will definitely try again with those two. thanks again!

  • Kathy

    This is probably a stupid question but does it make a difference what sort of pork leg bones are used? I picked up pork femur bones but also noticed some pork legs (not the feet) but with the flesh/skin still on (similar to the package of pork feet).

    My stock is more of a rich brown than pale cream color (chicken bones, pork femur bones & pork trotters). But I possibly caramelized the onion too much if the bones weren’t the issue.

    • Anonymous

      Hi Kathy, The femur bone should be right. Did you do the double boil for the
      bones? It’s possible the onions were over caramelized, but I get them pretty
      dark brown when I do it.

      • Kathy

        Thanks for the quick reply!

        I made the actual tonkatsu broth today (I seem to only have time to do a part a day >_>;;) and the sidefat (I couldn’t find fatback anywhere – Whole Food’s, Meat Shop or the grand asian market) and tahini definitely toned down the color but it was still more of a light-medium caramel brown. It was still good though!

        I’m wondering if I didn’t cook the bones long enough. I used a pressure cooker but my mother fussed about the pressure so it was more low-medium (although I’m not really sure how to gauge it… it’s the same pressure she uses to make sweet peanut soup). So I tried to make up for that by pressure cooking 2.5 hours.

        The chashu was absolutely delicious though. Thanks for putting all these recipes together!

  • Chocolatesa

    What type of sesame oil do you use for the mayu? Black or golden?

    • Anonymous

      I used golden, but black would give it a darker color, interesting idea!

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  • Rumraisin4me

    This is great. But is there a slightly simply (less ingredients) version of the soup base and ramen that’s maybe 50% easier but only about 15% less awesome?
    This seems to be a recipe for the perfect tonkotsu ramen, but I’d like a recipe that has the best balance of easy to make vs awesome tasting. Thanks!

    • Anonymous

      I’m usually all for cutting corners to make something 95% as tasty but with
      much less effort, but unfortunately there’s no shortcuts to be had here
      (unless you just buy packaged ramen.

  • serissime

    I’m really excited to make this. I asked some questions about noodles on the noodle page, but I have another question. I read your chashu page and I don’t remember ever seeing pig cheek in the store. I do know that my favorite butcher has beef cheek. I think they might have pork belly sometimes. Which would be better, beef cheek or pork belly? I also might need to use beef femur for the pig bones, not sure. Do you think that would be too different? I will have to actually ask the butcher to see if they have other stuff in the back or could specifically save me some when they slaughter. Anyways, thanks! I’m drooling now

    • Anonymous

      If your butcher carries pork, they should have the leg bones and feet.
      If not, try a latin american or chinese grocery store. As for the pork
      in Chashu, it’s traditionally made with pork belly so that will work
      just fine. I would not recommend using beef for ramen as it will have
      a very different flavor. If you have trouble finding pork products,
      chicken will produce a closer flavor than beef.

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  • serissime

    Hey again! I am about to start the broth tomorrow! I ended up getting 2 sliced pig trotters, and several pounds of pork *knuckles.* I asked around several places (including ethnic markets and on-site butchers) and no-one had pork marrow bones, only beef. (I got the impression that I would have to preorder for a slaughter date, and I’m not sure if they would do less than a 40lb case.) Also, no one had any chicken frames or bones. I did make chicken wings the other day and have a few wing-tips, as well as about a pound of leftover raw wings. Think I can use that as my chicken? I figure I’ll just strain the meat and everything out anyways.. and wings must have marrow too! Also, when everything is done being boiled for scrum, and you say to put the bones back in, you include the trotters, right? Just making sure :)

    I couldn’t find any pig cheek, just beef–but I did buy some pork belly. What I got has the skin left on… I should take it off before I make the chashu, right? And the ~1in thick layer of fat between skin and meat too, I would think.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The wings should work fine:-) Yep, after you do the first boil to get
      rid of the extra blood, you put everything back in a pot of clean
      water (you’ll still need to skim it for about 20 minutes as more scum
      will come up, but most of the really nasty stuff will be gone). As for
      the pork belly, it’s up to you whether you remove the skin or not. In
      Japan they would remove it (and the extra fat), but in China they
      would leave it on.

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  • Alex

    Marc… thanks so much for putting this together. I’m not a vegetarian but do believe that we should treat the animals we eat with respect and dignity. In my household, we purchase humaenly farmed animal products. So, finding the bones has been difficult to say the least. I did go to my local Whole Foods where they do have the pork leg bones but they are pre-smoked. Do you think that these would work? My initial thought is that it would change the flavor of the broth but I seem to be running out of options. Any thoughts?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The smoked bones will definitely change the flavor. Do you have any
      local butchers or pig farms near you that can get you the bones? Maybe
      at a farmers market? Since they aren’t very popular sellers most
      butchers won’t display them, but if you ask ahead of time, they can
      usually set them aside for you when they butcher a whole pig.

      • Alex

        I did find a local pig farmer but he only sells bone-in meat only, which means that I could buy the bone-in meat but would have to play the part of the butcher or take it somewhere. With that being said, do I want the front legs or the back legs? Are ham hocks the same thing as leg bones and could those be used? I looked up a butcher diagram and it looks like the hock is part of the leg but not the entire leg. This has definitely proved to be an adventure and understand why you wanted to document all of this on online! :-)

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          The leg meat is great for braising, so you could get the whole leg and
          use the meat for something else. I’m pretty sure the cut I’m talking
          about is the bone from the hind leg. Ham hocks are also part of the
          leg bone, except if the ham has been smoked or cooked (most hams are),
          the marrow in the bone will have rendered out a lot of the fat, which
          is where the soup gets it’s creaminess from, so I’m not sure it will
          work as well. It was quite an adventure to figure it out in the first
          place and I tried all kinds of cuts and bones before settling on the
          leg and trotters, so I know what you’re going through.

  • moriz

    Hello!

    Thank you very much for this great recipe!
    I’m trying to make tonkotsu ramen right now, and i’ve got a little difficulty to get this white colore of the stock. I used pork leg bones aswell as the pig trotters, cleaned the bones well, and skimmed any scum off the surface, but still after long time of cooking my stock is more brown in colore then white.
    Do you have any idea what could i have done wrong?

    Thanks for the reply and thanks again for this great recipe!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The tonkotsu base, won’t be totally white, it will be a creamy beige
      color. It won’t turn as white as in the photo until you add the tahini
      and fatback. Feel free to email me if that doesn’t answer your
      question.

  • Tlauver

    I haven’t yet been able to find pork leg bones, but I’ve certainly found trotters. Would it okay to substitute more trotters for the leg bone, or would that throw off the flavor too much? Thanks! Awesome recipe :)

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      To be honest I’m not entirely sure. Too many trotters may add too much
      collagen and the soup may end up way to thick. I guess you could try
      replacing the leg bones with half trotters half chicken bones.

  • Pascal

    Hello there!
    I just wanted to tell you that I loved reading the story behind it, I loved reading how to make it and all. Problem is I’m sharing my kitchen with 7 other people; I’ll have to wait till I get my own place (student now).
    Anyway, I love reading your stuff, thank you :)
    Take care

  • Laura

    Just curious – what size pressure cooker did you use? I have a 6 quart, but am concerned that it will not contain all those bones :)

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I think mine may have been an 8 qt, but I can’t remember and I’m not
      at home this week and next so I can’t check. You can do this without a
      pressure cooker but you’ll need to triple the cooking time.

      • Laura

        Thanks for your response. I prefer to do it in the pressure cooker so it’ll cut down on time. I might just have to use less water and add more water after straining the bones. I might do this as a project this weekend, and will let you know how it turns out!

        • laura

          my girlfriends and i spent the entire afternoon making it and although it did not turn out as milky white as your picture and we only had 4 bowls of soup, we were really pleased with the results and happy to have another successful cooking project under our belts. I forgot to add some water after the straining the broth from the pressure cooker, so our broth was very rich and well seasoned. i used trotters, pork hocks and chicken wings for the bones. thanks for sharing your recipe! oh yes, is the fatback supposed to melt into the broth? or do they stay as little squares in the soup?

          • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

            Glad you liked it! If you mince the fatback small it will almost
            completely dissolve, but there will still be little specks of fat you
            can see. The idea isn’t to have fat floating on top, but to emulsify
            it with the soup to make it richer.

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  • xnanodax

    Hey Marc :) Thank you for another awesome recipe!

    Does the fatback come from the stock? Or should I buy this?

    Thank you so much!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Fatback is a block of salted pork fat (you could also use italian
      “lardo”) think of it as ham made from the fat. It adds richness and
      body to the soup at the end.

  • Ishume

    Excellent posting.
    I have been searching for a good ramen recipe for many years…Just to see if I can entertain myself with this home cooked hearty soup and noodle. I have not used any fat back which, I believe, will thicken the soup considerably but I made the original stock thicker, which came from pork back and rib. Caramelized onion, onion and garlic mostly give the aroma and flavor to the soup as you mentioned.
    Let me try with leg bones and fat back in the next time.
    Again thx for the great posting.

  • Gordon

     My attempt didn’t come out so good – but I’m going to try again soon. Any idea how to recreate the amazing ramen from ichiran (hakata tonkotsu) or tenkaippin (chicken)?

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  • Buck

    Made this twice, first attempt was great, But second attempt Sucess. Luckily I have a great asian market here in dallas that had everything I needed! Thanks for the recipe Marc! I’m Truely inspired, And my house smells like a ramen shop almost every weekend!

  • http://voodooandsauce.com Heather Arndt Anderson

    I just forged myself on a bowl of tonkotsu ramen at a little joint in Portland called Shogun Noodle. Funny thing, whenever I fall in love with a new (to me) Japanese good, it ends up being a specialty of Hakata. Must be those browner onions that give it the magic!

  • http://voodooandsauce.com Heather Arndt Anderson

    (I mean ‘gorged’. Though ‘forged’ does an apt job of conveying the epic effect it had on my psyche.)

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  • Sebastianho448

    Hi Marc! I’ve tried your recipe and have a few Qs. Why do u use trotters? can i use large pork bones instead? if I use trotters, which part is better? the front or the back? I’ve used the back today. After boiling for 6hrs, my base stock is milky brownish and not milky white. something wrong?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The collagen in the trotters make the broth more creamy. I use the whole trotters split in half. As for color, milky beige sounds about right. It doesn’t get really white until you add the tahini and emulsify in the pork fat.

      • Sebastianho448

        Marc, what should I do with the pork fat? Cook it and minced it?

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          Just follow the recipe, it goes in at the very end.

          • Sebastianho448

            I couldn’t find any salted pork fat. All I could find in my market was some cubes of pork fat. Dun think is what you have mention.

          • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

            That’s fine, just mince it up and whisk it in at the end, when you emu Sift the fat in with the soup it makes it more white and more creamy.

          • Sebastianho448

            Thanks Marc! I’m going to try it again!

          • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

            That’s fine, just mince it up and whisk it in at the end, when you emu Sift the fat in with the soup it makes it more white and more creamy.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=828932221 Allen Chen

    Hi Marc! great post btw, i tried the soup base a month ago without the pressure cooker for 6 hours and the soup was light beige in color but today when i used pressure cooker for 5 hours the soup came out brown. The only difference i made between the 2 trials was instead of frying the vegetables, i roasted them in the oven. Do you think that was the main reason the soup wasnt beige? Or perhaps i overcooked the stock? I remember watching the Japanese tv shows the chefs usually cook the soup base over 24 hours so can we really overcook the soup?
    thanks

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      When you did it in the pressure cooker, did you boil it without the lid for about and hour and skim off the scum? Brown soup usually means some blood mixed into the soup.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=828932221 Allen Chen

        i think i only boiled it for about 30 mins, also, to my dismay that my friend secretly toss in a few carrots and scallions, could that be the factor to brown the soup as well?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UR6XTGRTLUBV3SJODXYFZWX7VM Anonymous

    Awesome post! Very interesting read. I’m heading to a new Hakata Ramen shop in Torrance now. While I appreciate your diligent research and careful science, I am going to leave it to the experts. Still searching for the perfect bowl of ramen since returning from 7 years in Japan however. Have yet to find “my place.” I may have to come back here and actually try out your findings.

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  • Omar

    You mentioned “1 tablespoon strained braising liquid from chashu”
    but forgot to include instructions on how to make it.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      If you click the link “Chashu” it will take you to the recipe.

  • chock

    I had two extra trotters and a large leg left laying around (a friend is shooting a pilot program she hopes to sell to Food Network, the program is about cut’s of meat, pork belly being featured in the pilot program) so I am trying the recipe right now.  I split the trotters in half and hacked (literately, hacksaw, cleaver and hammer) the bone to 4 pieces. 

    The chicken bones (whole carcass really) came from the leftovers from a whole chicken BBQ we had last night.  I also added some extra goodies we had left over from the shoot:  about 3 strips (1″ x 1″ x 3″) of fatty pork meat and two 4″ x 4″ x 1.5″ squares of pure pork belly fat.  The garlic, ginger and onion carmelized and smelled great – but I accidentally deviated a bit:  I chopped the onion instead of slicing (I was hopeful that some of the carmelized onion chunks would sneak into the final product).  Also, I don’t have a pressure cooker so everything is being done in just a normal pot.

    Right now, the tonkotsu base has about 2 hours of simmering on the stove.  My favorite ramen shops in San Francisco all pride themselves on letting the broth simmer for 48 hours.  My plan is to do the same.

  • Fcowie2

    This looks fabulous — that creamy pork stock!  I’ll definitely be making it.  But our fave ramen joint also adds about 1-2 tbsp of what they call “soup base” to the bowl, in addition to the soup.  (You can choose the amount: light, normal, heavy.)  I’m asking about the soup base because the eggs they serve in the ramen are absolutely to die for, and I asked did they pickle them in miso, and the chef said they were pickled/soaked in the soup base.  So now I’m wondering what that might be.  The eggs aren’t discolored as they would be if soaked in anything with soy.  Still look like regular hard-boiled eggs, but smooth and salty to the taste.  Any ideas?  (The ramen joint is Shen Sen Gumi in LA, if anyone’s wondering — me & the kids try other places, but always end up back there.)  Thanks.

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  • Wolfman200

    Could you clarify what you meant by “1 small head garlic trimmed but whole” . Does this mean that you leave the papery outer layer on, fry up the whole thing and strain it out later? If so, then some of the garlic stays basically raw, right? Or maybe you take it apart but don’t mince it? Thanks

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      By trimmed I mean to cut the stem part (top) off. This should expose all the garlic pieces to the oil and not only cook them through, they should be caramelized.

  • Mugen

    Hi Marc,
    I tried your tonkatsu ramen, and at the last I put sesame seeds and finely minced fatback.
    It turned out that the fatback didn’t combine in the soup. It just in few small chunks form.
    I wonder how your fatback can combine in soup?
    And as I can see, you don’t add vet shin in your soup. How can your soup has the sweet flavor?
    I tried without vet shin and it just didn’t has the sweetness.
    For the noodles, can we put the dough in the fridge for several days before we cook it?
    Thanks.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The fat back needs to minced into very small pieces each piece should be no bigger than 1-2mm. At that size it should mostly melt into the soup. What is vet shin?

      • Mugen

        Vet shin is msg. It makes the soup sweet. I will try the fat back again. And I am using the fat back which is not salted, does it makes different? Coz I get it from the butcher, and he only has one without salted.
        Marc, I have one more problem here. I always have my noodles not firm. And once I kept the rest of my noodles in the fridge, it turned out very sticky by tomorrow. Any suggestion?
        Thanks a lot.

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          Ah okay, I don’t like using MSG so don’t include it in my recipes, but if you prefer the flavor, by all means add some. As for the noodles how long do you boil them for? Depending on how thick your noodles are you may need to decrease the cooking time. Lately ive been boiling for 30-40 seconds and letting them finish cooking in the soup while I add the toppings. Also, what kind of kansui are you using?

          • Mugen

            I tried making the noodles today, and I am happy with the result now. My problem was I put the water too much for the previous dough. I am using lye water instead of kansui.
            Your recipe makes my family happy. Thanks to you.
            By the way, you mentioned before that you wanna post your hakata style ramen here. I wonder how it is going? It would great if you can post it.
            Thanks a lot.

  • Faylen

    HI Marc,
    Thank you very much for this recipe. I will use it as a starting point for my own ramen adventures. I thought you might be amused to know that I carmelized the onions garlic and ginger in sesame oil and used that to make mayu (and saved the rest) It gave the mayu a wonderful sweet gingery aroma in addition to the burnt garlic that was really tasty. It might be worth more experimentation.

  • susannah

    I have to say that I greatly appreciate all of your hard work and dedication to this AMAZING ramen.  I lived in Japan for two years, and have yet to find a decent bowl of tonkotsu anywhere around me, so thank you x 1000 for doing this and sharing it!

  • Mugen

    Hi Marc,
    As I noticed when I put my noodles in the room temperature for about 20 minutes, my noodles dry out and become crisp. Shouldn’t it be the same texture like when it just being roll out? And if I keep my noodles in the fridge for later use ( like 1 or 2 days), the colour changed. Any suggestions for the noodles?
    Thanks a lot.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The noodles should be boiled as soon as they come off the pasta maker, otherwise they will dry out. If you need to keep them longer, dust them very liberally with flour and store them in the fridge. Unfortunately I haven’t found a way to prevent the color from changing when you leave them in the fridge, but the texture doesn’t seem to be affected too much.

      • Mugen

        Thanks for ur reply Marc.

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  • Alex

    I feel like trying to make this dish will prove to be my undoing, but I’m hugely thankful for the recipe all the same. For now, I just have a question: What if I use chicken feet instead of “just any” chicken bones? I ask because I happen to have them in the freezer. Would that put too much collagen in the tonkotsu base? I assume (perhaps incorrectly) that the trotters also make the base richer and more collagen-y, but there seems to be a point to your using a mix of leg bones and trotters. Substituting the leg bones for more trotters feels like something I should not try to do (however tricky the leg bones will be to get hold of), so I’m hesitating about the chicken feet as well.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I’ve never tried it with chicken feet, but I do know that it is possible to overdo the collagen (I tried making it once with all trotters and it was too thick). The reason why I add the chicken bones is that it adds flavor and umami without adding too much richness. Since the feet is largely skin and cartilage it may upset the balance.

  • Hikari Frozen

    wow this is a must do receipe for me..
    just need to verify somethings before i start off hopefully this weekend.. Assuming i have a pressure
    cooker

    Tonkotsu Base

    pig trotters -> 15mins on boiling water(with pressure cooker and no lid)
    pig leg bones -> 15mins on boiling water(with pressure cooker and no lid)
    chicken bones -> 15mins on boiling water(with pressure cooker and no lid)

    QUESTIONS:
    1.can i remove the meat part of the pig leg bones and just use the bones ?
    2.Which part of the chickens do i need to obtain the chicken bones ?

    AFTER cleaning all of them.. I just add them all with water and bring to boil while removing any
    visible foam for around 30mins

    QUESTION:
    1. Do i use the same water for the next part ?

    AFTER that i add Ginger, Garlic, Onion and then close pressure cooker lid and cook for around
    1hr 45mins

    QUESTION:
    1. Do i have to check and add water on my pressure cooker ?

  • Hikari Frozen

    wow this is a must do receipe for me..
    just need to verify somethings before i start off hopefully this weekend.. Assuming i have a pressure
    cooker

    Tonkotsu Base

    pig trotters -> 15mins on boiling water(with pressure cooker and no lid)
    pig leg bones -> 15mins on boiling water(with pressure cooker and no lid)
    chicken bones -> 15mins on boiling water(with pressure cooker and no lid)

    QUESTIONS:
    1.can i remove the meat part of the pig leg bones and just use the bones ?
    2.Which part of the chickens do i need to obtain the chicken bones ?

    AFTER cleaning all of them.. I just add them all with water and bring to boil while removing any
    visible foam for around 30mins

    QUESTION:
    1. Do i use the same water for the next part ?

    AFTER that i add Ginger, Garlic, Onion and then close pressure cooker lid and cook for around
    1hr 45mins

    QUESTION:
    1. Do i have to check and add water on my pressure cooker ?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      QUESTIONS: 
      1.can i remove the meat part of the pig leg bones and just use the bones ?I usually just buy bones, which has a little meat clinging too them. There’s no need to remove the remaining meat, but you also don’t need to get a full roast with all the meat on the bones. 2.Which part of the chickens do i need to obtain the chicken bones ?
      I usually just ask my butcher for chicken carcases, it’s a by product when they make breast and thigh fillets. It’s not super important which parts of the chickens you use. 
      1. Do i use the same water for the next part ?
      Yes
      1. Do i have to check and add water on my pressure cooker ?
      You shouldn’t have to. Just make sure the bones are well covered when you affix the lid. If you’re concerned, you can quick release the lid half-way through and check the water level. Also if you don’t have a pressure cooker, just triple the cooking time (about 5 hours).

      • Hikari Frozen

        allrite .. tks.. oh well i am a week behind due to work ..  gonna try it out this thursday HOPEFULLY before new year.. haha..

  • Xi Xi Yuu

    your realization was right on the mark.  the pork broth is almost flavorless even if it is a glistening gelatinous white.  when we make the batches and someone tastes it, its just for texture and richness (and I won’t lie, a whiter broth seems to make ppl think it tastes better and they’ll pay more…NOPE!).  If u were to put the noodles in that white broth and not season it with Tare, konbu dashi, or something else. (which you have here actually made “Mayu Ramen in tonkatsu broth”) – it would taste so bland and awful.  

    Traditionally the MSG flavoring comes from konbu and dried shrimp and sardines for saltiness and smokiness.  This becomes konbu dashi (and where the natural umami flavor comes from).  On top of that, they will ladle some kind of seasoning base like salt solution with mirin and sake or soy sauce with sesame oils etc etc so many possibilities-flavor plus more umami.  

    Which is why I am sort of surprised you dont mention konbu or soy product anywhere in this recipe..(did you add MSG or chicken boillon because there would have been almost no umami, though the fatback would have helped assuming it was the salted kind.)

    I think if you keep digging down this rabbit hole you’ll find that ramen is something so complicated and yet if u think about it, just noodles in a soup.  If you grasp the elements of this particular soup (stock + umami agent + flavoring agent + alkaline noodles + meat and toppings = WIN), and you dont overcook the noodles then you can master any kind of noodle soup.  Pho in my opinion is just as time consuming but not as scrutinized if u mess it up.  Chinese noodles soups vary 100 times more than ramen, but everyone is not so picky about the parameters.  

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It really depends on the region of Japan whether seafood is added to the broth or not. Kanto style Shoyu ramen often includes seafood as does Shio, and Miso ramen. Traditionally Tonkotsu ramen (Kyushu style) does not include seafood in the broth. 

      Personally I like the combo of chicken, pork, and caramelized vegetables to make a tonkotsu broth. I look at making ramen a bit like composing a song for a symphony. The pork provides the bass (tuba, bass, etc), the chicken provides the treble (flute, violin, etc), and the caramelized veggies provide everything in between (french horn, cello, etc).

      I’m not sure where you get the impression that there’s no umami in this soup, the pork or chicken on its own would be plenty, but it also has caramelized onions, garlic and ginger, and that’s just for the base. The soup includes braising liquid from the chashu, tahini (sesame has tons of umami compounds), and mayu. The fatback isn’t there for flavor, it’s mostly for richness.

  • Yooniverse

    If you add the carmelized ginger, garlic and onions, doesn’t that turn the broth brown and not milky white as described/depicted?  That’s what happened to me when I tried out this recipe.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The broth will be a light beige color. It will get lighter when you add the fatback and tahini. If your broth turned out very brown even after adding the tahini and fatback, it’s possible the onions were over caramelized or there was still some blood left in the bones.

      • Yooniverse

        I guess I over caramelized it. The stock was looking pretty white and scum-free when I added the ginger, garlic and onions just before I pressure cooked it. My definition of caramelizing must be different than yours. I’ll try browning it lighter.

        Also, my base gelatinized overnight. Was that to be expected? How do I store it and reuse when it turns into a hard gelatin?

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          The gelatin is from the melted collagen in the soup and is what gives it the richness (i.e. it’s a good thing). When you reheat it, it will melt. The fridge is fine for up to a week, if you intend to keep it longer, freeze it.

  • chefgodzilla

    salted pork fat is not available..only pork fat or actual “salt pork”

    what do you suggest?

  • Russ Paulsen

    Trying to recreate what we had in LA and this all looked right. The base was delicious, but the finished soup was way, way overwhelmed by garlic. Do you really mean one raw clove per bowl?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Couple of possibilities here. 1) Personal preference – I tend to like lots of garlic in my ramen (I usually put a spoonful of raw garlic in even at ramen restaurants). 2) Size of the cloves – your garlic cloves may have been a lot bigger than mine. My suggestion would be cut back on the garlic to suit your tastes, you could even leave it out if you want as there’s caramelized garlic in the base and if you’re making mayu, there will be garlic there too.

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  • Erik Haqvinsson

    Will you ever make shoyu ramen? :)

  • Will

    Hi Marc !i have kept your recipe at arm reach for few months now, always trying to get more information from different websites but i am getting eager to get started ! few questions for you before i get to work and maybe you or some one reading this will be able to help ;)1) i have seen some people roasting the bones before using them. How would the flavors differs from yours recipe ? if roasting, we shouldnt blanched the bones right ? (we want the fat and remaining meat getting roasted/caramalised  ?) ? could/should chicken bones get roasted too ?2) i was thinking to use a whole chicken, glaze it with something semilar as the braising liquid of the chashu and then use it for the stock …. is that too early to add those flavors the broth ? should i first focus and getting a well balanced liquid and then add the right flavors before serving ?3) how long can I use the bones for ? how many “brews” can i expect to yield with the same amount of bones ?  when should the bones be discarded ? for health reasons, can the bones be refrozen after use ?4) Have you tried to infuse the water with kombu, shitake and/or dry fish when starting the process ?5) the restaurant i work at, is using cloves of blackgarlic: extremely slowy roasted garlic, they are actually getting confied …. i was thinking to use those to make the Mayu. but do the “burnt flavors” adding something extra to the bowl that i am missing ? hope you will find some time to share some tips with us ! If i dont hear from you before i get started i will post some of my discoveries !PeaceWill

    • will

      i did use spacing and Paragraphs !

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Will, thanks for your comment. 1) You can certainly roast the bones and it will change the flavor profile, however if you roast the bones, your soup will not turn out white. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing as the Maillard reaction will make the broth taste more complex, but the resulting brown soup will not be a classic tonkotsu broth. 2) There’s no right or wrong way to make ramen, but traditionally the broth is extracted from the bones and then the seasoning is added afterwards. 3) The bones can only be used once. You’re literally cooking the marrow out of the bones, so you won’t get much of a stock out of them the second go around. 4) typically tonkotsu broths do not include any kind of seafood. That said, other styles of ramen such as shio(salt) and shoyu(soy sauce) use seafood broths so you’re welcome to experiment with these combinations. Although not traditionally added to Tokotsu broth, I’ve recently started throwing in some kombu because it adds umami without changing the flavor as adding dried bonito or shiitake would do. 5) “black garlic” is usually garlic that’s been fermented for a few weeks in a warm place. This is a different reaction than the the caramelization and maillard reaction that takes place from burning garlic, so the flavors will be different. That said, I think black garlic may make an interesting addition to miso ramen as the nutty flavors would really compliment each other. Mayu is made by literally burning the garlic, if you eat it straight it is quite bitter and burnt tasting, but adding just a little to a bowl of creamy tonkotsu ramen is divine.

      • will

        Thank you for your tips Marc ! Cannt wait to be sunday to give it a go ;)

        One last thing, the Chashu on the top picture isnt made of cheek, is it ??

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          Good luck. As for the chasu, to be honest I can’t remember what I used, it looks a little like pork belly, but I sometimes buy transglutaminase bonded cheek meet that ends up looking a bit like well marbled belly (complete with layers of fat).

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  • Richard Attar

    Hello Mark!

    Like Will, I’ve also kept this recipe saved and looked at often for a few months. I finally made it last night for my family! It was excellent! 

    I wanted to thank you, as there are no recipes on the net like this at all! I love to cook, and am a recent ramen enthusiast, and this recipe is a lifer! Thank you again!

  • Karen Lai

    Hi Marc,
    Thank you so much for the recipe. I’m going to make it this Sunday.
    Wish me luck.

  • MJ

    Hi Marc,
    How about chickens feet as a replacement for chicken bones?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      To be honest I’m not sure. You’ll get a lot of collagen (the stuff that makes the soup creamy) out of chicken feet, but I’m not sure how much flavor you’ll get out of them. Try it out and let us know how it goes.

    • will

      i have used 3 carcasses ( small one ) and 3 or 4 chicken feet, cannt tell you if it changed the flavor but my lips kept sticking for hours ! and the broth solidifies quite fast … i mean that if i let  your bowl untouched for couple of minutes, a film will appears on top of the liquid. wont used  them next time and check the differences

  • will

    Hey  there !

    second attempt … and getting better ! just a way too much garlic (yes its possible ! )and a bit too dark  !

    Marc, just wondering, the  picture of the broth (2 pictures up) is the final product with tahini and pork fat or the strain liquid from the pressur cooker ??

    ty !

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Glad to hear it! That picture is of the finished soup with tahini and fatback added (you can see the little white bits of fat floating on top).

      • will

        thanks god ! i ve been expecting a creamy white broth everytime i open the pressure cooker ! always get milker with the tahini and pork fat at the end anyway ;)

        When you say trotters cut in half lengthwise, do you mean through the bone and expose the marrow or between the bones to separate them ?

        i havent been able to find the leg bones so i used 2 hocks, remove the meat of them and cut them in half. i have been using the fat off the hocks with salt and garlic to replace the backfat in the recipe. do you see anything wrong with the hocks ??  do you think the fat is much different than the one you are using ?

        i have been  using the hocks meat for the chashu recipes as well, final result is not as bad as i though it would ! no waste in my kitchen hehe.

        Pic of my second try

        • will

          and the meat taste more gamy actually …. not sure if i like that ! cheeks next time ;)

        • Lihar7

          Will, may I know how to make the hardboiled egg you showed in the picture? Thanks

          • Gas Ledouarin

            Hey lihar, the eggs are pretty easy to be done !

            Room temperature egg, pierce the bottom of the egg with a needle (you actually dont have to do that at all, but i think the peeling is easier). Boil some water, drop the egg in water and keep it in for 6mn. (add time for harder holk). Drop the eggs in iced water to stop the cooking process.

            Peel the egg and let it sit in a soy mixture …. I always change the mix :) check mark’s chashu recipe for a good base. I warm up the mix for 30 seconds in the microwave, pour into a zip bag with the egg in it. Couple of hours are enough to get the flavors in and change the color of the egg :)

            Hope it helps !

          • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

            Great technique! That’s how I prepare my ajitsuke tamago as well. Thanks for sharing!

  • Lilian_squirrel

    Out of curiosity, is the base supposed to taste like anything? because mine is a bit too dark, and doesn’t have a taste. A wonderful smell, but no taste.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi, I’m not sure what you mean by “taste”. If you mean salt, then no the base shouldn’t have any salt, that gets added later when you make the soup. If you mean flavor, then it should taste like pork, garlic ginger and onions.

      • Lilian_squirrel

        Weird. Mine doesn’t seem to have a distinctive flavor. It only tastes a bit like all of those things. I tried using it to make the soup anyway- it didn’t turn out well. 

        I noticed the soup when refrigerated was gelatinous but quickly heated up to liquid again, so the consistency seemed okay… I’m not sure what went wrong.

  • Sarah

    Hello,

    Have you cracked the Ippudo vegetarian miso wasabi broth yet? I would love to get your feedback on how to replicate it! 

    Thanks,

    Sarah

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I’ve never tried it before. That said you can make a pretty good vegan ramen by making a good dashi (with stuff like kombu, celery, leeks, fried ginger and garlic, fresh shiitake etc), then mixing it with soy milk, sake, and soy sauce or miso. I’ll post a recipe at some point.

      • Sarah

        That would be great! Thank you!

  • cnusara

    I finally tried this today. It is delicious. My friends said it’s better than Ippudo. We also made our own chashu and ramen, using your recipes. Thank you so much for sharing. It’s very clear you are passionate about your dishes :) 

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  • Ra Ordonio

    I will try this weekend, I got a week off, its hard to find this type of ramen in the philippines, in Kobe i eat lots of this type of ramen…

  • http://universityadmissionsguide.com/ Lee

    I’ve always loved eating ramen but I never really tried cooking one. I always go to ichiran ramen in Ueno on weekends. 

  • Jon

    Hi Marc, 

    Thanks for posting the recipe, i tried it last weekend but failed! I have had Tonkotsu once in Vancouver and it was incredible but I live in London and haven’t tracked it down here. Sadly i could only find pigs feet (which i saw used in another recipe instead of pork bones) so i used those but the stock came out brown :-(
    I read online that you need to keep the water boiling throughout to get the white creamy stock, would you agree? I need to track down some pork leg bone and try again.

    Thanks

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The stock will not be perfectly white. It’s more like a beige that turns a cream color when you add the other ingredients. Honestly, having perfectly white broth is not a prerequisite for Tonkotsu broth. I think it’s more important that it tastes good.

      If you still think your broth was browner than it should have been, my guess is that the problem might have been the length of the first boil ( there may still have been some raw blood that leeched into the soup), or that you missed some of the scum that floats to the surface before affixing the lid to the pressure cooker. You really need to keep skimming until there’s no foam floating to the top.

      I hope this helps for next time!

      • Jon

        thank you.. i’ll keep all those in mind on the next attempt :-)

  • DP

    Hey, thanks for the great post. I’ve greatly missed this ramen ever since I came back from a long stay in Japan. I can get it at a place about 5 hours away, but not regularly! So I was really excited when I saw this. I immediately made it, almost just as you describe (on the stove) and the results were amazing! I cut on a few ingredients and modified to fit my taste, but boy was it worth it! Piping hot tonkotsu is just what the doctor ordered! You are one of the few sites with recipes for this, and one of the best at that! Thank you again for allowing me some delicious, dearly missed comfort food. You’re not crazy for trying this–you’re crazy if you don’t! It takes a bit of time, but what’s the issue with leaving a pot on the stove for a few hours while you do other things? 

    Once again–AMAZING. Thank god for norecipes.com

    DP

  • fata w

    Hi Marc, thank you so much for your post. I’m planning to make it this weekend. Do you by any chance know how to make ippudo’s secret miso paste that they add into their akamaru modern?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It’s been a while since I’ve had it, but I think it’s miso, doubanjiang, a lot of ground toasted sesame seeds, maybe some garlic.

  • Missbecki

    Hi Marc,
    Can the soup stock be frozen, I want to make it this weekend for myself and an Ederly Japanese friend but don’t want to waste any of the stock.

    Thanks
    Becki

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Absolutely! I usually make this on a weekend and divide up the base and freeze it. One thing you should know, because of the amount of collagen in the soup, it will look very strange if you defrost it (like a sponge with water coming out of it). Don’t worry about this, it will all melt when you heat it up on the stove. I usually skip the defrosting step and stick the frozen block of soup in a pot and just heat it up directly.

      • Missbecki

        Great now to buy the ingredients!!!

      • Missbecki

        Well it’s perfect. I’m so happy with how this came out I will be tking the
        Makings around to my elderly friends house and cooking it for her.

        Thank you for sharing this.

        Becki.

        [IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v483/jfans/bdfb4f83.jpg[/IMG]

  • Rikke Olsen

    I don’t get it… I’ve cooked my stock for 20 hours, but it’s not white.cloudy :(
    I have almost a whole pig’s head, several legs (with marrow) – though no trotters. Is the lack of trotters what causes it to to be white and cloudy?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Rikke, were the leg bones cut? The marrow needs to be exposed. Also, as stated in the update, it’s important to use both legs and trotters to get the creamy color.

      • Rikke Olsen

        Not in half, length-wise. I thought that might have been the problem, but the marrow seemed to have been cooked out of the bones, though. I don’t know.

        Thanks for your quick reply!
         Although not white, I’ve got myself a very good-tasting broth! I am making tonkotsu ramen for some Japanese exchange students, and they are really looking forward to it, as Denmark really isn’t the place to get Japanese food :)

        I’ll get some trotters, cook a supplementary broth and add it to what I already have.

        Thanks again, and thank you so much for all your recipes!

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          Crosswise should be fine. I’m guessing it was the lack of trotters then. Keep in mind that the soup will be more like a creamy beige color until you add the tahini and fatback. 

          Your story reminds me of being asked by a host family to make sushi one night in Hesingor. I had to go to Copenhagen just to get sushi rice, seasoned it with wine vinegar and used things like lumpfish caviar and gravad laks till fill it. 

          • Rikke Olsen

            After having been in Japan, I’ll never eat sushi in Denmark again; the quality is too low, the fishes are too few and the price is WAY too high (if you make it yourself, the price is OK, but if eating out, it’s like 4 times the Japanese prices).

  • Rikke Olsen

    Hi again, Mark!
    Just wanted to let you know that my Japanese friend were VERY happy to eat the tonkotsu I made!I will do that again, for sure!Thanks so much!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Cici-Yi/587445647 Cici Yi

    OMG…I finally found an authentic ramen receipe. This is just amazing.

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  • Jeff

    Hi Marc. Thank you for this site and thank you for this recipe. I’d been wandering in the wilderness creating flat, uninspired, brown soup which lacked the essence of what makes ramen delicious. When I read your recipe, I got really excited and got to work on assembling the ingredients.

    I followed the recipe very closely (which I never do)and took it slow. It turned out AWESOME (and was even better the next day!)

    I invited my Japanese ex-pat workmate over to try it and it went over super well.

    The only thing that proved daunting was that the pork cheeks I picked up still had the skin on them. It was difficult to get them trimmed up an thus the chasu in the soup was a bit fatty.

    I can’t wait to give it another try.

      

  • Yogicfoodie

    Hi again Marc,
    I am on a quest to make my replica of Ippudo ramen.  After having it everyday for a week, and now am back at home, away from my addiction pot, gotta make my own. 
    (I think they must pour in some magic dust in their broth or something…)

    Chashu is done, my trotters are being defrosted in the fridge, and I’ll be picking up the chicken bones and the pork leg bones from my butcher shop tomorrow. 
    I’ve read your recipies above and one for the miso ramen at least ten times, and am so dying to make this.

    Couple of questions for you…
    If I’m doubling the recipe, how long should I cook for?  10 hrs. or is it longer the better?

    When you say 1 small head garlic trimmed but whole, you mean 1 head of garlic peeled, and trimmed, but not smashed or sliced, am I correct?

    I don’t mean to be nit-picky, but I MUST succeed, a failure is not an option this time!

    I’ll let you know how this turns out.

      

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Doubling the recipe should not increase the cooking time provided the bones are still cut to the same size. For the garlic, I just mean to trim off the stem and root part, the head should still be more or less whole and the individual cloves should not be peeled. You can kind of see it in the bottom right corner of the picture of the veggies frying. Good luck!

    • Yogicfoodie

      Hi again Marc,
      Thank you so much!  My stock is all done and cooling down at this moment.
      I guess i didn’t skim off enough fat.  The color came out a bit darker than the photo above and there about 1/8′ of fat layer at the top.  I’ll remove it once it’s completely cooled.   

      Gotta make mayu tonight. 
      A question for you.  Is there anything I can do with the oil I caramelized the veg. with?
      It reminded me of extra virgin olive oil I infuse with basil or other herbs, but I wasn’t sure if this veggi oil will be usable.  It certainly smells nice though..

      Also, how long can I keep mayu in the fridge before its fragrance is effected?

      Thank you so much Marc, I’ll take a pic. of a bowl tomorrow dinner!

      • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

        The photo is of the finished soup (including tahini and fat, which lighten the color of the soup), so your base should be a darker color. As for the frying oil, I usually keep it and use it to saute veggies etc in it. It does retain the flavor of the things you fried in it and adds some great flavor to other foods. The mayu should keep for a few months if you put it in a sealed container in the fridge, but you’ll be surprised at how useful it is as an additive to other foods (add to soups, stews, dressings, marinades or toss with pasta with parmesan cheese) and it probably won’t last that long.

        • Yogicfoodie

          Hi again Marc,
          I finally was able to put together the ramen last night.  Needless to say, my two toddlers and hubby gobbled up (two bowls each!) and requested that we have it again tonight.

          Thank you so much for your wonderful recipe.  I was able to follow it precisely and everything turned out just as it should be.  (I did soak & drained the bones and trotter in the cold water for about half a day to get the blood out before cooking.)   Everyone dug in before I was able to take any pictures.  I’m gonna try again tonight.

          Since I didn’t dare making the noodles from scratch, I ended up using thin wanton noodles (egg noodles) instead.

          So glad I made the double batch of the broth.  This was one of my most labor intensive cooking I’ve done in a while and it was totally worth it!

          Now my dreaming days Ippudo ramen is over.  I’m so glad I found your website and will be visiting often soon!

          Your mapo tofu recipe is calling me~~  I haven’t had it since grade school back in Korea, and I haven’t found a recipe that I fell in love with yet.  T.T

          Thank you so so much!
           

  • Ramen lover

    Hi Marc,
    A lot of people cook ramen soup for very long hours like 20hours or even longer.
    Do you think cook the bones longer the better it taste?
    And I just want to make sure about the salted fat back.
    I couldn’t find salted fat back, but I get the fat back directly from my butcher (fresh not salted).
    Does it make any different?
    Last question: the chashu I made still don’t have the feeling like melting in the mouth.
    I cook the chashu for one hour and 20 minutes. Do you think 2hours cook can make it softer?
    Thank you.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Honestly, I think 20 hours is excessive. Basically at the point the bones are crumbling you’re not going to get any more flavor out of them. Also, I’ve found that over cooking the stock makes it taste like canned meat. If you’re using trotters and leg bones, you should be able to get a good stock at the specified length of time (triple if you’re not using a pressure cooker). 

      As for the fatback, fresh should be fine. Just make sure it’s minced very small so it renders quickly and emulsifies with the soup. 

      Regarding the chashu, if you’re findiing it’s still tough because of fat and connective tissue (i.e. gristle), it will benefit from cooking longer. If it’s tough and starting to dry out (i.e. no fat left and no connective tissue), it’s because of the cut of meat didn’t have enough fat to begin with and cooking it longer will only make it tougher. 

      Hope that helps!

      • Gin5678

        Hi Marc! Thanks so much for this recipe! I miss ipuddo’s ramen in Japan I will definitely try this out! Can I use a slow cooker instead of a pressure cooker?

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          While many things benefit from low and slow cooking, ramen stock is not one of them. The simmering action helps keep the fat and stock emulsified, creating the creamy soup. If the heat is too low, the fat will just render out and float to the top and you’ll get a brown soup at the bottom. 

        • gina

          finally had the time to make it..it’s a lot of work (am no expert chef) but it turned out awesome!! thanks so much, marc! my husband (who was also missing ippudo ramen) loved it so much he asked me to make it again soon (o-oh!) i think i saw you guesting at bobby flay’s “grilling it…” show too? wow im one huge fan now! :D

          • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

            Thanks Gina, I’m glad you liked it! Yep, I was on Grill it a few years ago, but they’re always playing reruns:-)

  • mono

    Hi Marc,
    I tried this and it worked out pretty well. The dough was painful to process, but once I managed to thin the stubborn thing enough to be cut by the Spaghetti attachment, the noodles were great! Next time I won’t use a cover for the stock though. I don’t normally use a cover when I make Chinese chicken&pork stock, this time I did and it turned out to be much less creamy/sticky, which was unexpected because for my normal stock I use mostly chicken parts (about 1kg necks 1kg carcasses and wings) and about 3/4kg cut trotters. Much less bone & marrow than I used here (1kg cut pork bones, 1kg chicken carcasses, 2 lengthwise cut trotters), and still the stock ended up much less creamy, even though I’m normally cooking my Chinese stock for only about 2h. So I think it was because of cooking it with a lid, at least it felt like this when I was cooking. Another question, how did you up with the whiteish color? Adding caramelized garlic and onion immediately turned my stock brown, as expected. Not a problem at all, I didn’t expect it to be any different but I’m curious as it looks nice! Chashu was really nice too, good idea to use cheeks, using spareribs tonight (the fact that I’m having the same Ramen 2 days in a row shows you they turned out really well :) )

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Glad to hear you enjoyed it! I guess cooking it without a lid would lead to more liquid evaporating, so the soup would concentrate faster than cooking it with a lid (though with less stock at the end). I’ll give it a try next time. as for the color, the photos are all of the soup after the tahini and fat have been added, which lighten the color of the soup. One of these days I’ll take a photo of the base stock, which should be a beige color.

  • Ami_4111

    thanks so much for sharing. reading your recipes makes me want to try it out too. although the process looks difficult, as long as the end result is good, i don’t mind the work. your blog is great!

  • yurfavmistake

    OMG this was the best ramen I’ve ever made

  • Austin872

    Hi Marc,

    Stupid me, while cleaning the bones I decided to use a chopstick to clean out any red stuff, which includes the marrow in the bones, was this a bad idea?

    Actually I know it was a bad idea because the broth ended up watery and brown, is this because i cleaned out the marrow in the bones? Also, it didnt particularly taste like tonkotsu, it was more like one of those pork hock stews :(

    In the end, I also had trouble with melting down the pork fat, I couldnt find salted fatback so I just got mine fresh, have you got any tips in this area?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Austin, thanks for the note! I guess there is a such thing as being too thorough:-) The soup being watery was most likely due to removing all the marrow. The fat (from the marrow) emulsifying with the water while boiling is what gives tonkotsu its rich flavor and cloudy color. It’s good that you removed the blood, but next time leave the marrow. It should have still been pretty rich though from the collagen coming out of the hocks though so I’m not sure what happened there. As for the pork fat, I’ve never tried with unsalted pork fat, but it should still melt if you cut it fine enough. If you’re having trouble getting it small, try freezing the fat first. Each piece of fat should be around 1/16″ of an inch in diameter (i.e. it needs to be finely minced). I hope that helps!

      • Austin872

         Thanks for the reply Marc!
        Guess I was too meticulous :) i’ll refrain from cleaning out the marrow next time and simply brush around the bone! do you recommend cooking the fatback (or fat in my case) as the bones are cooking to get some of that creaminess early on?
        Also, while the bones are cooking should I have it on a constant rolling boil or the lowest setting?

        It does help Marc, i’ll have plenty more questions, but i’m not allowed back in the kitchen for a while since I apparently wasted a good 10 hours of gas :)

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          Hi Austin, the fatback is kind of along the lines of adding butter to a French style sauce at the very end. It adds body and richness that’s a little different from the richness that comes from cooking the marrow fat for hours, so I would keep the two separate. As for cooking the bones, it should be at a constant strong simmer/low boil (not a rolling boil, not a gentle simmer) as it needs the agitation to keep the fat emulsified with the stock. If you use a pressure cooker, this will happen automatically, but if you’re using a pot, you’ll need to adjust the temperature and add water as it evaporates. You’ll also need to triple the cooking time.

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  • Anthony M

    Browsed this recipe on and off for the past 3 months. Ordered a pressure cooker and gave it a try this past weekend. Firstly, after the long cooking process I ended up with only about 4 cups; when I put it in the fridge, it was a texture of gelo. The stock was a bit dark but from reading comments below, this is expectecd till the tahini is added. I added the tahini and the color was lighter but not as pictured on this site. The worst part was that the soup tasted bitter :( I tasted the tahini “as is” and it was bitter. I’ve never had tahini before so is it suppose to be bitter?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Sorry to hear you’re having problems. When you’re not using a pressure cooker, the stock will evaporate and you need to add water, but it’s really strange that you only ended up with 4 cups of stock using a pressure cooker. You should be able to add some water to the stock to thin it out. The gelatin consistency is a good thing. It means that you got a lot of collagen out of the cartilage and connective tissue and is what gives the stock richness. The soup should not taste bitter though. What brand of tahini did you use?

      • Anthony M

        Marc, thanks for the response. Guess I do have good stock then…yippee. The tahini brand I’d use is named Sadaf; 100% pure sesame. I’m certain the bitter taste was my fault. I think I did not stir the tahini well enough before adding to the stock. I’d just tried again and it’s no longer bitter.

  • Marty

    Bookmarked! – Mos def gonna try this one weekend!

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  • Dave

    Marc, Have you ever just dropped a small piece of pig skin with fat into a soup? I slipped one into a chicken stock I was making and I got the white ‘fat’ or collagen floating, after skimming, and also when I poured the soup out of the pot cold into containers, there were little mountains of white fat dotting the bottom of the pan. Read about this from the cookbook “Bones”. So now I keep 3″ squares of pig skin in the freezer to drop into soups. Adds the unctuousness to almost anything. Let me know what you think

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Dave, I’ve never tried dropping just the skin in, but the that’s the reason for the trotters in this soup. They’re the most collagen rich cut of pork because of the skin and all the connective tissue and cartilage in them.

  • Catherine Hollick

    I am going to attempt to make this recipe this Friday/Saturday, however, I am cooking for 10 guests… In terms of quantities in the ramen and chasu, which ingredients will need more? Thank you! :)

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      This makes enough for about 5-6 bowls of soup, so you should double this recipe. You’ll also want to double (or triple) the chashu recipe depending on how much meat you want to put on each bowl of ramen.

      • Catherine Hollick

        Thanks for this wonderful recipe Mark! My friends loved the ramen and chasu :)

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  • http://aquapunk.net/ Lo

    Hey is it possible to scrub the bones too much? Because my second boil didn’t result in the thick, opaque broth I’m supposed to get. It’s very cloudy with collagen, but it’s not a creamy white. I’ll see how it looks after simmering for 5 hours…

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Lo, how long have you boiled the stock for after cleaning? If you’re not using a pressure cooking it will take 6 hours, and the broth won’t get really creamy until towards the end. Also, did you substitute any of the bones (i.e. did you use pork leg + hock + chicken)?

      • http://aquapunk.net/ Lo

        OK, 3 hours in, and it’s looking great. I actually added in another foot for good measure, too. Thanks for still replying to this thread after so long!

  • Kimchi

    Just made this and its sooo yummy! Thank you so much for the recipe. I once ate a Tonkotsu ramen that was super spicy – do you by any chance know how to make a spicy sauce as an add on to the ramen?

  • http://twitter.com/northsidelocal PJ Julian

    This is by far the best English language tonkotsu training piece one can find anywhere. My second time trying the recipe, I decided to lightly roast the bones in the oven, I did this after the initial boil and cleansing. To my delight I was able to achieve SUPER WHITE broth within the first two hours. I know some French techniques call for roasting bones to impart color, but most I have seen and used also call for tomato paste, flour, and blackened onions. I truly believe a simple dry roasting of bones without any additives gets the broth to white. How? I have no clue.
    Thanks so much for working on this recipe. Great work!

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  • hamtons

    Great recipe, got the white creaminess on my 3rd attempt. Secret is that one can never chop the Fatback(i used fresh pork hard fat) small enough. I blended it in a blender with home made tahini and it looks like extra creamy but runny-ier chowder.

    thanks from singapore!

    • Tristan Leterrier

      a great technique to get a creamy and white-as-milk broth is to add pig skin before cooking the broth (300g for a 8-10 L pressure cooker), then discard the bones, and use a bar mixer to emulsifiate the marrow and fat.
      believe me, you ‘ll get a perfect broth in no time

      • hamtons

        great! shall try it, thanks!

        • Tristan Leterrier

          you welcome. here’s my last attempt, 3 days ago. the broth was really white before adding 35cc of chashu sauce.

          • hamtons

            looks great!

            ok so I add the skin to the other ingredients before cooking. once it is cooked, remove the bones and break down the remaining marrow and fats in the pot?

          • Tristan Leterrier

            yeah exactly. l also remove the garlic and ginger.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/edwardseeholee Edward See Ho Lee

    Marc, did you try Ichiran ramen when you were in Fukuoka?? I’ve been trying to find somewhere that did a Tonkotsu ramen as good as that for years. How would you compare it to yours??

    (am in New York next week on holiday, so am really looking forward to trying the Tonkotsu ramen at Ippudo…)

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  • Rob

    Hey Marc! Love your site. I’m going to try your ramen recipe but I need to get a pressure cooker. What brand and size pressure cooker do you use?

    Thanks,
    Rob

  • nance

    Do you know how to get those wonderful tender bamboo shoots that is traditional with ramen? Is there a Japanese name for it?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      It’s called menma. They’re bamboo shoots that have been preserved in salt, and are prepared by first soaking in water to remove the excess salt, then you just season them with dashi, mirin, and soy sauce and cook.

  • JohnMayhew

    Hey Marc, if I double the recipe does that mean I double the time for cooking in a pressure cooker as well?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Nope, you’ll need a larger pressure cooker, and the time it take for the cooker to get up to pressure may take a little longer, but the cooking time remains the same.

      • http://www.facebook.com/tristan.leterrier Tristan Usagiuchi

        Hi Marc, thanks a lot for your recipe.
        It’s my second attempt doing tonkotsu ramen and l couldn’t get the stock right…again!
        the stock always turns to brown, very different from your stock that is almost white..
        and even after 2 hours in the pressure cooker (10L) the stock is not really creamy…
        i don’t get why…
        it would be awesome if you could upload a video to see each steps of your recipe..

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          Hi Tristan, sorry to hear it’s not working for you. Are you using the types of bones listed in the recipe? If so, it’s possible that there’s still blood coming out of them after the first boil, so you can try and boil them a little longer before scrubbing. Also, keep in mind that the soup stock will be a light brown color before you add the tahini and fatback, it also won’t look super creamy until those ingredients are added.

  • JohnMayhew

    Hey Marc, if I double the recipe should I double the pressure cooker time as well?

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  • Kolten J

    Marc, I am having the hardest time finding pork leg bones from anyone here in Utah. Is there any way I could use ham hocks? If so, do I cut off the excess meat and use just the bone. I am dying to try this recipe. Thank you!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Kolten, to be honest I’ve never tried using ham hocks to make this soup so I’m not entirely sure how well it will work. Aside from the smoke flavor that the ham hock will add (which might be interesting), the other potential issue I see is that ham hocks have already been cooked, which means some of the collagen and fat have probably already been rendered out. Were you able to find pig trotters? While you could probably get away with substituting out the leg bones for something else, the trotters are essential to get a creamy tonkotsu broth. As for the meat on the bone, a little bit of meat is fine as it will add flavor.

  • Venise

    I tried making this today, but I didn’t have all the ingredients (such as the pig trotters…) So I had to improvise with pork bones and fat that I’ve been saving to make soup, with a bit of homemade chicken stock. Even though I didn’t make it like yours, it was probably the best ramen I’ve had, since the restaurants that I’ve been to in Montreal up to date are pretty regular, and are no where near authentic ramen. My dad had some and he was so impressed… I told him next time he wants me to make some, to buy me the pig trotters. :P

    Btw, I searched and searched for a great recipe for tonktosu and yours just seemed awesome, especially because of the research you put into it… One video just said to boil pork bones with a bit of ginger for the broth and served it like that with the chasu and other toppings… no mirin or tahini or anything else! :S SO… Thank you! :D

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  • JH

    Hi if I do not have a pressure cooker, at what heat do I cook the soup base in? High heat or medium heat? Thanks

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Medium heat. You want the water to be at a hard simmer to keep the fat and liquid emulsified, but if it’s boiling too much , you’ll keep having to add water. Keep in mind you’ll also need to triple the cooking time if you don’t use a pressure cooker.

  • ByThePowerOfRAmen

    Awesome recipe man. I’ve got some late night seconds at my side as I type this message. I used duck bones and it turned out fantastic. I was wondering if you could recommend any toppings or condiments to balance the richness of the soup? Maybe some sort of pickled ginger? Also, could the duck bones have played a role in making the broth a little richer than I’d like?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Wow, duck bones, that sounds awesome! I’m assuming you substituted the chicken for duck bones? If so, it’s unlikely the bones contributed richness unless there was still a lot of fat and cartilage on the bones. The richness comes from fat and melted cartilage (collagen) in the soup and was most likely from the pork. You can make it less rich by eliminating the minced pork fat at the end.

      • ByThePowerOfRAmen

        I bet it was the extra trotter, hah. Seems obvious in retrospect. They looked so small, but I guess a little goes a long way! Making this soon for family, thanks for the perfect recipe!

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  • Savita

    This is awesome! I followed the recipe exactly, and it’s just delicious. I actually doubled the number of pig trotters for the broth, so now I have some frozen away for next time. Many thanks!

  • Kami

    OMG!!! I can’t believe i found a good recipe for making ramen. It’s always in my mind to try this one. I will definitely try to make it this weekend. Is pig trotter as same as pig feet? I will post it again how it turns out. Thanks, Marc!!! I am so excited. :D…

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Yep, it’s a euphemism for pigs feet:-)

      • kami

        Thanks, Marc! What do you mean Pork Fat? I made the broth yesterday and it turned out so good. The color is white creamy color. I couldn’t find any chicken bones so I bought five chicken drums and take out the meat and used the drum bones. LOL…I haven’t finished the rest of steps since we will have the noodles tonight. I don’t have the ramen maker so i am going to substitute with different type of noodles. If you don’t make your own ramen, where can you buy the ones it’s already been made? I found the pork fat at supermarket but they’re like raw pig fat (non-cooked). Do you mean pork fat like Chashu? The pork fat is already ground like tiny cubes from my supermarket which is very nice so i don’t have to chop or ground it myself. Do I need to do anything before I add to the soup?

        • kami

          How do you make braising liquid? Just soy sauce and miso together?

          braising liquid

          • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

            The braising liquid is the liquid that the chashu braises in, so you’ll need to click the link to the “chasu” post and make that first to get the liquid.

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          Hi Kami, yep, by “pork fat” I literally mean uncooked pork fat. It’s great that it already came minced, but depending on how small the cubes are you may want to go over them once again with a knife (they should be as small as possible . The idea is a bit like adding butter to soup or risotto at the very end to add richness, so you don’t want to have big chunks of fat floating in your soup. The heat from the hot soup should almost instantly melt and cook the fat. As for the noodles, I’ve never been able to find good ramen noodles in the US, which is why I started making my own. Even large Japanese grocery stores like Mitsuwa don’t sell plain uncooked ramen noodles without the soup. The closest thing are the thin Chinese yellow noodles that are sold in most Chinatowns and Asian grocery stores.

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  • lisa

    hi Marc,can i freeze the base if i can for how long?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Yep, absolutely. I usually make a double batch and freeze it in 2 portion sizes. As for the length of time it all depends on your freezer. It will never spoil in a freezer, but over time, it will start to take on “freezer smell”, and get freezer burned on the surface. Use your best judgement based on how long things have lasted in your freezer in the past.

      • The Little Dumpling

        A tip on this that I think works well is to lightly oil the container before you freeze the base. Sure, the base will grab some of the oil, but you need to let the base cool to refrigerator temperatures before you make this transfer, so it is a cold base. Let it freeze, then pour a slim layer of oil over the base. When you thaw, you can either skim or spoon this layer off, depending on when you do it. But, of course, if you use a high quality oil, you can always consider it as an additional ingredient. That’s what I do.

        Loudon

  • Alan

    Marc,
    Awesome receipe!! I have question of the quality of the pork leg bone. As far as pork leg bone , Is there specific size and color of the pork leg bone we should be looking at when we buy them from the market?
    Thanks again.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Alan, while I’m sure there are good and bad pork leg bones, I’m usually just happy to find them. If I had to hazard a guess I’d say that thicker bones probably have more marrow (a good thing) and that bones from heritage breeds of pork have better flavor (Mangalica, Iberico, Berkshire, etc).

  • The Little Dumpling

    Marc,

    Your website, which I’ve been lurking around on for a month, led me on a dazzling food shopping trip in Anchorage, Alaska yesterday. Got trotters, fatback, tahini, all kinds of goodies. I will let you know how the experimentations go. Your site is absolutely phenomenal. I hope it is rewarding.

    Loudon

  • http://www.facebook.com/richy648 Richard Ha

    Hi Marc,

    This might be a silly question, but I couldn’t get the trotters cut lengthwise at the butcher because I got them prepackaged from an Asian supermarket. Am I suppose to cut through the bone or can I just cut through the meat leaving the bone exposed? Also I’m supposed to dump the trotters into the broth together with the bones correct? Sorry I’m still new at this. I love your site and thanks again!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Richard, yep, it’s best to cut the trotters through the bone. Butchers usually use a band saw to cut through them, so you’ll probably have a tough time cutting them at home. It should still work okay if you’re not split, but you’ll need to cook them for longer. Even if they are prepackaged most supermarkets have the saws to cut up larger carcasses so if you can get someones attention you should be able to get them to cut them in half. The trotters go in with the bones.

  • Travis

    For the chicken bones, would just throwing in a bunch of chicken wings (with meat still attached) work, or should the bones be completely free of meat? Thanks!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      With meat will work fine.

  • Titus

    Hey Marc, great site you got here. I was trying your recipe and I was wondering if pig feet bone would work. Or it has to be pig leg bone. Also, do I need pig hock as mentioned in one of the comments? Thanks!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Titus, ideally you need both feet and leg bones. The feet lack marrow, while the leg bones lack collagen, both of these elements are what make the soup white and creamy.

  • Matt

    I’ve read that using a pressure cooker for too long won’t actually help with extracting more flavour from the bones. Have you ever tried to make this without using a pressure cooker? Any noticeable differences? Really appreciate this post! Thanks

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Because pressure cookers speed up the time in which the flavor is extracted from the bones (usually 2-3x faster), cooking it beyond a certain point is pointless. It actually because detrimental to the stock as the bones will start to break down and you’ll end up with a gritty stock. Since leg bones and trotters are so thick, I find that it needs about 1.5 to 2 hours, but there wouldn’t be much point in cooking it beyond that.

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  • Joey

    Made it. Loved it. Thank you!

  • goldfool

    I think you are in NYC area. Do you know about sun noodle? They opened a factory for Ramen in Tetterboro airport, there should be some local places that sell the fresh different types of noodles. They have also done tastings.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I’m no longer living in New York, but it’s great to hear there’s a place making fresh noodles locally.

  • Tristan Leterrier

    Hi Marc!! I followed a recipe that is a little bit different ( 7kgs of pig thy bones ,600 g of pig skin, ginger and garlic, 2 pots), but the result was really good, and l did got a white and creamy broth !!
    l seasoned it with homemade shio-tare, shoyu-tare, and maayu.Toppings were nitamago and torotoro chashu , sesame seeds , leeks, ans white pepper. In France, even in Paris, there is no japanese restaurant that serve tonkotsu ramen, so l made a big ramen party so my friends could taste and they loved it !! thanks again for your help and your knowledge !!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Sounds delicious! Great idea using skin in place of the trotters.

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  • Jaren

    hey marc! i followed the recipe to prepare the broth but did not have the creamy soup base =( it looked a little darker from the caramelised onions, garlic and ginger. the pork leg bone is the knuckle that the butcher gave me at the market. could this be why it might be wrong? (nonetheless the trotters should have the collagen though…)

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Jaren, the base will have a light tan color and will not look super creamy until you add the tahini and pork fat to the final soup. The collagen from the trotters is part of the equation but you really need the marrow from the leg bones for the richness.

    • Tristan Leterrier

      if you are having troubles to get the creamy texture, here’s a tip:
      discard the bones after cooking, and use a barmixer to emulsifiate the stock,then filter it.
      within 30sec you’ll get a super creamy white soup

  • CindyC

    This is Awesome! you’re Awesome! thx very much :)

  • Mikio

    Hello Marc. Congrats on your blog, great recipes and fabulous pictures.

    Just tried your tonkotsu recipe last night and as a nikkei former exchange student in Fukuoka I must say that you really hit the spot with this one.

    Before last night, I had been craving for a bowl of tonkotsu ramen for years. I went to almost every ramenya in town but their tonkotsu didn’t even come close to the real thing. I was starting to think that it was impossible to eat a real tonkotsu ramen outside of Japan…..So you can imagine how grateful I am for this recipe! Thanks for your efforts!

    Just a quick one: I was wondering if you know how they make the hard noodles (katamen) that the ramenya usually offer in northern Kyushu.

    Greetings from Lima, Peru

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Mikio, the term “katamen” usually refers to the the cooking the noodles for a shorter amount of time, which results in firmer noodles. They’re not actually different noodles.

  • Andreas Grüter

    Hi Marc.
    This is such a great blog you have. I have very little experience in the kitchen but i really want to try to make this tonkotsu ramen. I got some pork leg bones, trotters and chicken bones from my local butcher. The trotters were cut, but do I have to cut the bones as to expose the marrow or do I leave them whole?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Andreas, it would be best to expose the marrow. You can put the bones in a thick plastic bag and use a hammer to break them in half.

  • evan tomas

    Hello Marc, Glad to have found your blog and will most definitely be trying this recipe out soon! Just wanted to know if I can use an aluminum stock pot. I purchased a large one for a good price from a restaurant supply store, but have read that aluminum can give on a metallic flavor to stocks. Thank you!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      While aluminum has never been shown to be a causal factor in Alzheimer’s, it can none-the-less be toxic to humans in high enough doses. If it weren’t for a very thin layer of aluminum oxide coating aluminum surfaces (naturally occurs when a freshly cut piece of aluminum makes contact with air) will easily corrode. Salts dissolved in water will corrode aluminum given enough time and heat will accelerate this. Also, while aluminum is a very good conductor of heat, this can lead to hot spots in your pan especially when you’re using it on a gas stove. All this is to say that I typically try to avoid aluminum cookware when I can. Stainless steel (though heavier and more expensive) is less reactive and conducts heat more evenly.

      • evan tomas

        Ok, thank you!

  • Alan

    Hi Marc, I know most of the famous Ramen restaurant in japan and now in US uses stock refractometer / brix reading to measure the thickness of the soup. What is your recommended brix reading (0-33%) for the soup. I have heard around 10-11%. How do you adjusted the concentration of the soup..if it’s higher or lower at the time of measurement ? Just add water to thin it out to get a lower reading? Or cook it longer to evaporated some of the water content out to get a higher reading of the soup to match around 10%? Since I really want consistence in my soup every time. It could be the pork bone and trotter I used have different content of collagen and fat..etc to make my soup not taste the same every time . Any tips on getting consistence soup?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Alan, I’ve heard of refractometers being used to measure brix for ramen, but I’m not sure what sugar content has to do with the consistency of the soup. In a chain restaurant setting where you don’t have the time to properly train apprentices, I could see how something like this could be useful, but for home use (or even a single ramen shop), I’m of the belief that it’s important to rely on your senses rather than the output of some instrument to decide when the ramen tastes right. Van Gogh didn’t use a colorimeter to mix his paints after all. I guess my point is that if everyone made the same ramen, the world of ramen would get boring very quickly. Taste your soup and decide what consistency is right for you.

  • Lili Little

    Hi Marc
    Is tonkotsu ramen different from tonkatsu ramen? I’m assuming that this isn’t tonkatsu because it’s doesn’t have fried pork but I wasn’t sure. Thanks!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Lili, Tonkotsu means “pork bone”, Tonkatsu means “pork cutlet”, two different words, two different dishes. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a tonkatsu ramen before, but it might be interesting:-)

  • Adam

    Hey Marc!

    I ordered two pig trotters (cut lengthwise) from my local butcher. When they came in it was actually the feet and the entire leg with meat attached (basically two of these cut lengthwise and raw: http://t2.ftcdn.net/jpg/00/43/76/43/400_F_43764338_rnix3pQOgwQn6W0vkz5sVUOUyFgr6eln.jpg)

    So I was wondering, since you described trotters as just the feet, do I actually need 1.5 more pounds of pig leg bone, or is what I have already sufficient? Thanks for your time and your awesome recipe!

  • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

    Hi Adam, how much marrow is in the bones? It looks like it should be enough, but the reason why you want the leg bones (the bones from above the knee joint) is that they contain a lot of marrow.

    • Adam

      Plenty of Marrow.

  • Canadaramen

    Making the whole recipe for the second time…it rocked the first time, but that was a while back. Question: I chilledthe base broth after cooking it but before straining it. It had about an inch of fat congealed on top. It is a wonderful cream colour. I don’t want to toss it out in case I need to reintroduce it…should I keep it or toss it? Am I likely to need it to add back? I doubled the recipe.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Save it, it’s great for for making stir-fries and can be used as manteca to make tortillas and such. As for reintroducing, you’re going to be adding fatback into the finished soup, so you shouldn’t need it for the ramen.

  • Emiliano Lucchi

    Hello Marc,
    I’m very happy i find your site, i would like to try your recipe but i can’t find pork leg bones, you think i can use beef bones with lot of marrow or just use more pig trotter that are easy to find?thank you

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Emiliano, it will change the balance of the soup, but you could increase the chicken bones and trotters. I would not recommend using beef bones as it will give you a totally different soup.

      • Emiliano Lucchi

        Thank you so much, and happy New year.

  • josh

    Once the stock is scum-free, add the caramelized ginger, garlic, and onions
    to the stock. What kind of onion? white, yellow, red? just making sure i get the right onion. thank you

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Any will taste fine, but red onions will give you some unwanted color, so I’d go for white or yellow.

      • josh

        Thank you for taking the time to reply. your recipes are awesome!

  • Pedro Faria

    Hey Marc,
    This recipe is oh-so-good! I don’t how to express my gratitude. I made a mistake letting the onions get burned and the stock didn’t turn out white in color, but nonetheless the taste… the smell… it’s heavenly! I have yet to find pork cheeks for chasu, but even with belly it was awesome. Thank you very much!

  • Yogicfoodie

    Hi Marc,
    Making it again for the fifth time! I can’t thank you enough for the recipe.
    Sidebar question, could you recommand a pot big enough to hold double batch of stock?
    Thank you again.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      You’ll probably need a commercial pressure cooker (the aluminum kind with lid that’s secured by bolts) to do a double batch. I’m not a big fan of aluminum cookware so can’t really make any recommendations there.

  • Mzjpuff

    Hi Marc, I have made this recipe about 3 times now and it’s definitely a great tasting broth. The only problem I have is that I am not getting 10-12 cups of broth out of this recipe, maybe like 4 cups at the most. I originally bought the 6 quart Fagor pressure cooker cause that was the one listed on your page but I see now that it’s been upgraded to an 8 quart. Does using a bigger pressure cooker solve this problem or am I doing something else wrong?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Mzjpuff, it sounds like you’re experiencing more evaporation than I do somewhere along the line. I’m wondering if it’s in the step where you skim off the scum floating to the top. When this step is done and before you affix the lid are the bones still covered with water? If not, add some more water here. Otherwise, you may have the heat on the pressure cooker turned up too high. The heat should be high enough to barely maintain a whistle. It’s too low if the whistle stops and it’s too high if it’s making a loud hissing sputtering noise. In any case you should still be getting a same amount of flavor out of the bones (it’s just more concentrated), so you can just add water at the end to make more stock.

  • Mzjpuff

    I recently came back from a vacation in Japan and I fell in love with Rokurinsha’s Tsukemen. I used this Tonkotsu broth and a fish based broth to try and re-create it. I definitely have to keep experimenting with this. Are you by any chance going to post a tsukemen recipe soon perhaps???

  • Passenger

    Dear Marc,

    If I am not mistaken, Hakata styled ramen includes pig head inside the broth, thus it gives a thicker soup. Also, they tend to take a mallet and lift the bones from the broth while its cooking and break the pork bone into pieces. If I am not mistaken Ippudo does use pig head in its soup. I hope this helps.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Passenger, if you can find it, pig head works great because it has a ton of collagen, but it’s not readily available in the US which is why I use trotters (which also contain a ton of collagen). The mallet for breaking the bones is to release the fat in the marrow into the soup, but you can get the same effect by cutting the trotters lengthwise and having the leg bones cut into pieces. Hope that helps.

  • johnwu

    Thank you very much for this recipe! Made it just now and even though I used pork back bones rather than leg and had no chicken bones, it still came out delicious if not exactly the creamy white broth I wanted. Next time, I’ll make sure to use the right ingredients. Here are some tips for those wanting to make this as I ran into some obstacles:

    -If you’re going to use a pressure cooker, be careful not to cook it on high heat for those two hours. Once I opened it up, my liquid had reduced by a lot.

    -Once you’re making the actual broth that the ramen goes into, question your taste test. When I tasted the soup, I felt it was a bit bland or not salty enough which may also have to do with the fact that I didn’t have the proper bones other than the trotters. It made me panic and I ended up oversalting it. Fortunately, I was able to salvage it by adding a bit of sugar and more water. I think had I not overreacted, the broth would’ve been perfect with all the flavors of the toppings and mayu complementing it.

  • Mzjpuff

    Hi Marc, I got 6-8 cups today when I made it cause I put the pressure cooker on low like you suggested. Much less evaporation. So now my problem is the broth isn’t creamy white. It’s a light brown and I cleaned the heck out of all the bones! What’s wrong now?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Mzjpuff, the broth straight out of the pressure cooker will not be creamy white. It doesn’t get that way until you whisk in the tahini and pork fat. It’s the emulsion of collagen and fat that makes tonkotsu broth white.

      • Mzjpuff

        Ohhhh ok! I was getting so fustrated because I thought I was doing it wrong every time! Thank you so much! Hopefully, fourth times a charm! :)

  • david

    hi
    I heard that some people put soy milk in the base. How it was work??
    If I put atari goma, is work better than tahini??

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi David, I actually put soy milk in chicken ramen. You’re certainly welcome to add it to make it even more creamy, but it is not a traditional addition to tonkotsu ramen.

  • david

    also fried ginger, garlic and onion, can you tell me why have to do frying??
    or can I just put fresh one???

    thank you

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      The aromatics are fried for the same reason onions need to be very well caramelized for making french onion soup. The high heat induces the maillard reaction which creates thousands of different flavor compounds not found in the fresh ingredients.

  • david

    Thank you for quick answer. In L.A. there is silverlake ramen. They are totally new taste ramen. Very creamy and good salty. I try to make same as there style but something missing in my soup. When you use salt, it have to be kosher?? And how to make soup really roasting sesame seed taste. I put sesame but its not work. ㅠㅠ

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi david, I’ve never had silverlake’s ramen so I’m not sure what it tastes like, but if you’re trying to get more sesame taste, try adding more tahini. As for salt, it doesn’t have to be Kosher salt, but table salt is less salty than kosher, so be sure to reduce the amount of salt if you’re using table salt. I hope that helps.

      • david

        omg!!! so quick answer.. thank you!!!!

  • http://www.ramirosalas.com/ Ramiro Salas

    Thank you for posting this. I made this recipe over the last couple
    of days and it came out fantastic. A few minor changes: I added 1/2 cup
    of Sake to the broth before pressure cooking. This increases the acidity
    slightly and allows for more collagen extraction. Second, I pressure
    cooked for 2 1/2 hours, following the advice from the Modernist Cuisine
    on pressure cooking times for stocks (1 1/2 hrs for poultry, 2 1/2 hrs
    for beef or pork). I use a large Kuhn-Rikon cooker so I don’t have
    issues with water evaporation. I passed the broth through a fat
    separator after filtering so I can make sure the only fat source is from
    the fat back. When mixing the Tahini and the fat back, I used an
    immersion blender (in low speed) to make sure everything was smooth.

    I used pork belly for the Chasu and I bough the highest quality noodles I
    could find (frozen, not tightly packed) since I didn’t have enough
    bandwidth to go for the whole thing. I also added a bit of Vietnamese
    fish sauce instead of salt, giving it a much nicer umami taste without
    being noticeable. In addition to the standard toppings, I also added
    finely sliced black garlic for added complexity.

    All in all, I can say I won’t be doing the lines in my local Ramen shops in the Bay Area anymore… Thanks again!

    • david

      hmmmm adding fish sauce?? how was it?? is it salty ?? or not too sweet??
      I want to try it.

      • http://www.ramirosalas.com/ Ramiro Salas

        It depends how much you put in. I added about 2 Tbsp for the whole broth, so the overall effect was negligible, but I didn’t need to add any extra salt at the end. With that amount, you don’t even know it’s there. That being said, Fish sauce provides a small amount of natural MSG, so it adds also the umami flavor. The overall “feel” of the broth tasted more “whole” if that makes any sense.

        • david

          Sound great!!! I will try it and I will let you know ..thank u

  • Jason

    Omg! Thank you so much for posting this! Like you, I have been trying for years to perfect my tonkotsu broth; unsuccessfully. It has always been off a bit. In comparison to what you posted, I wasn’t off by much though. You have a few things listed that I didn’t think of or missed. Thank you!! Great short read too BTW. Sounds like the inspiration was strong in you.

  • Natalie

    Hi Marc – do you have a ship ramen recipe to share?

    Thanks,
    Natalie

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Natalie, what’s a ship ramen?

  • Stern.

    Hi marc, thank you for sharing this traditional recipe( certainly one of the better ones here on the internet).
    Lately I was experimenting with miso ramen, but I didn’t find a recipe I could trust, could you please share a good miso ramen recipe?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Stern, I’ve actually evolved both my tonkotsu and miso ramen recipes significantly since I published this. Been meaning to do an update with video but just haven’t had the time. Basically for miso, I start with the tonkotsu broth and then add a miso paste that I make with 3 kinds of miso (mostly white, some red and just a bit of hatcho), sake, sugar, garlic, ginger and ground pork, that I sauté and then torch. Hope that helps.

      • Stern.

        Thanks for your reply!
        I am looking forward to the update!
        It’s kinda hard too find those ingredients on the other side of the planet…
        I will try to make the tonkotsu with the miso paste today, but it will be different since I only have the red miso paste laying around.(and I was lucky to even buy that, and ofcourse overpriced, 300ml for €5(6,5 dollars))
        I actually never heard of the white and hatcho ramen, so I will search for that too.(I probably have to import that tough)

  • Daniel

    Thank You for this, I’m also curious if you (or anyone) know or have a great vegetarian ramen recipe, as great as tonkotsu is some friends simply wont eat it

    looking forward to your Updated recipes, thanks

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Daniel, getting the same richness as tonkotsu in a vegetarian broth is going to be pretty difficult, that said, I make a vegan ramen using konbu dashi and soy milk that’s pretty good. Not the same obviously, but it’s pretty tasty.

  • Paul Beveridge

    Also thanks for posting all of this. I can’t wait to start experimenting.

  • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

    Hi Paul, it’s so funny that you mention that place, I was just looking at their site and wanting to try it out. While I haven’t been to that one, I have been to a place that does kogashi miso in Sapporo though and it tastes great. That place usually wok fries ground pork with some aromatics, adds the miso and then torches it with a massive blowtorch.

    • Paul Beveridge

      It’s sooooo good!! i recently returned to UK after living in Tokyo for 10 years, and I think that and 武道家 (Budouka) in Waseda were my two favorites.

      Also, do you have a recipe for tantanmen?

      Thank you!!!

      • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

        Awesome! I’ll add that one to the list to try out too. As for Tantanmen, I do one based on this tonkotsu broth with extra tahini, and then I top it with meat and sauce (no tofu) from my mabo tofu http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/mapo-tofu/ Then I finish with scallions and extra Sichuan pepper and doubanjiang.

  • Paul Beveridge

    I’ve been reading up a lot of japanese sites on how to make tenkaippin kotteri ramen, have you ever tried making this? thanks!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      I’ve actually never been to tenkaippin, but here’s my kotteri chicken ramen: http://norecipes.com/recipe/chicken-ramen-recipe/ it’s pretty rich and lately I’ve been making a lot more than this tonkotsu because it’s a lot faster.

  • Hai C

    Hello Marc, apologies if this question has already been posted. I tried searching, but could not find…

    In any case, I have made this recipe 3x and I was only able to get the milky tonkotsu consistency during my first run, even though I’ve use the same bone/ratios on each run. On the last run, I was so excited because I started to see milkiness in the broth before I put on the lid, but the broth turned out brown again.

    Besides having the wrong type of bones, could anything give the broth a brown color? Only thing I’m thinking right now, is perhaps burnt onions? Because, mine were closer to burnt than golden on the last run.

    Thanks for the recipe!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Hai C, it could be the onions or it could be that the bones you used didn’t have enough marrow, but honestly if the soup tasted good, you shouldn’t stress too much about the color, even in Japan tonkotsu broth is rarely perfectly white. Also, when you add the other ingredients the broth should get lighter in color. Hope that helps!

  • Kaem

    I jUst made it two days ago, it as realy good! I’m so impressed with your recipe :) I made it last Tuesday and heated it up tonight, the soup and chasu pork taste so much better!! I can’t fine sake here in Melbourne, so I only used chinese cooking wine instead, it turned out awesome :) :)

  • Umai

    I used 2 pork : 1 chicken bones and added a dashi bag. I omitted the chicken bones previously, but the broth seems to have more flavor and texture with chicken bones. I whisked minced fatback in the boiling broth but it did not dissolve. Why? I had to use a blender.

    Do you know how to make Ippudo’s secret “Umami Dama” miso paste in their Akamaru Modern ramen? It looks like a mix of toubanjan and tomatoes but doesn’t taste like it.

    My broth was already light colored, but became white as milk after adding sesame paste. It was very creamy.

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Umai, the fat will not totally melt, but it should release a fair amount of fat, making the broth creamy. This is why it’s important to mince the fat very small. As for Ippudo’s umamidama, it’s been a while since I’ve had it so I can’t remember exactly what it tasted like. If I were going to make something like this though, I”d probably start with tobanjan, and blend it together with crispy fried garlic, black garlic (the fermented kind), and kombu salt,

      • Umai

        Thank you for your reply! The bones do not produce much fat and does not require skimming. Would I therefore have similar results if I simmered the fatback with the bones during the broth creation phase instead of blending it in the end?

        By the way, I prefer this version to Ippudo which is too salty for me!

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          Hi Umai, the reason there doesn’t seem to be much fat in the soup is because it’s emulsified in the soup, but there is actually quite a bit (this is what makes it creamy). The extra fatback is just adding a bit more richness at the end (kind of like adding cream to a soup at the very end). You could certainly add it earlier, but I think you’ll see it’s different. As for the garlic I mean black garlic (not black beans). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_garlic_(food) it’s sweet, mellow and ridiculously full of umami.

      • Umai

        Do you mean fermented black bean instead of fermented black garlic?

  • Andy

    First of all I tried your Tonkotsu recipe and it’s awesome! Curious about your thoughts about using Kombu for Tonkotsu Ramen. In your Chicken Ramen recipe you use Kombu. For your Tonkotsu Ramen you do not. Is it because Tonkotsu has a heavier taste?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Andy, nice catch. The difference is that this recipe is much older than the chicken one. I have a new formula for tonkotsu ramen that I’ve been wanting to share but just haven’t gotten around to it. Using kombu in the stock is one of the changes.

      • Andy

        Oh wow! I would love to hear about your new formula! It’s that time of year for Ramen experimenting!

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