Warm Eggnog Recipe

Eggnog

Eggnog is one of those much maligned holiday traditions, taking it’s place right alongside jewel speckled fruitcakes and mincemeat pie. Being a lover of eggs, sugar and cream, I never quite got why people hate it so much, but it’s popularity seems to have waned even further in recent years due to food safety concerns as well as the heart-attack inducing amount of cholesterol in one glass of this creamy eggy concoction.

Given my recent trip home and another planned for Christmas, I decided to stay in Manhattan for Thanksgiving this year. Thoughts of wandering out to the Thanksgiving Parade did cross my mind but I quickly dismissed them given the lunatic crowds that were sure to be lining the streets of 6th Ave.

Eggnog Holiday Drink

Although I had my Thanksgiving meal earlier this week with friends, something just didn’t feel right with letting this day of thanks pass by without some holiday cheer. Eggnog seemed like the perfect mid-afternoon pick-me-up, but after perusing a few recipes online it seemed far too complicated, and used about six more eggs than I was willing to ingest in one sitting.

I decided to take a hack at reinventing this childhood favourite as a grownup cocktail. The result? a warm eggnog, that’s quick to make, a pleasure to drink, and something that will get you tipsy faster than you can burn the marshmallows on your yams. By getting the eggs nice and frothy before adding the hot dairy, you’ll have a nice full bodied elixir, that’s satisfyingly rich without being thick or cloying. The brandy is optional, but really, what fun are the holidays without a little happy juice?

2009 has been a rough year, full of ups and downs, but despite my unemployment for most of this year, I’ve been able to put food on the table every day this year and for that I’m most thankful. If you have something to be thankful for, let us know in the comments, and please consider giving back, with a donation to the World Food Program through Blog Away Hunger.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Warm Eggnog

2 large high quality eggs
1/3 cup sugar
1 cup half and half
1/2 cup cream
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/3 cup brandy or bourbon (optional)
nutmeg

Bring 2 eggs up to room temperature. Add the eggs to a blender and blend on high until a light creamy yellow color.

In a small saucepan, heat 1/3 C sugar with the half and half and cream over a gentle heat until you can see steam rising off the surface and some bubbles start to form around the edges of the pan. With the blender running, slowly pour the hot milk mixture into the eggs through the lid. Add the vanilla and continue blending the eggnog for a minute.

If you want to make your eggnog alcoholic slowly pour in up to 1/3 C brandy or bourbon into the running blender. Serve hot in small glasses with some nutmeg freshly grated on top.

  • http://cookappeal.blogspot.com/ Chef E

    My sister and I were just talking about how we did not grow up with this, but we find in our own guilty pleasure after discovering it! I look forward to duplicating this Marc…

  • http://cookappeal.blogspot.com/ Chef E

    My sister and I were just talking about how we did not grow up with this, but we find in our own guilty pleasure after discovering it! I look forward to duplicating this Marc…

  • http://www.twitter.com/eatdrinklove amy

    I love eggnog. It’s a guilty pleasure of mine. Thanks for the recipe!

  • http://www.twitter.com/eatdrinklove amy

    I love eggnog. It’s a guilty pleasure of mine. Thanks for the recipe!

  • http://blog.melonoat.com/ melonoat

    i LOVE eggnog too! im looking forward to testing this out!

  • http://blog.melonoat.com melonoat

    i LOVE eggnog too! im looking forward to testing this out!

  • http://memoriesinthebaking.blogspot.com/ Marysol

    Marc, unlike the dried fruit brick, eggnog has always been embraced by my troops.
    And I know I would enjoy yours, except, I’d prefer a bigger glass.
    Hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving.

  • http://memoriesinthebaking.blogspot.com Marysol

    Marc, unlike the dried fruit brick, eggnog has always been embraced by my troops.
    And I know I would enjoy yours, except, I’d prefer a bigger glass.
    Hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving.

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com/ Manggy

    Marc, I’m thankful that things in your life appear to have stabilized :) I must admit I haven’t had one since I was a kid– it always seemed like a questionable luxury to us, as we did not have nutmeg on the shelves back then. Maybe it’s time I give it another shot :)

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com Manggy

    Marc, I’m thankful that things in your life appear to have stabilized :) I must admit I haven’t had one since I was a kid– it always seemed like a questionable luxury to us, as we did not have nutmeg on the shelves back then. Maybe it’s time I give it another shot :)

  • http://www.hungryandfrozen.blogspot.com/ Laura @ Hungry and Frozen

    I’ve actually never tried eggnog, and while it has always seemed a little creepy, I guess it’s no worse than semifreddo or uncooked cake batter, both of which I eat with gusto. Your recipe looks seriously inviting. Hope 2010 has more ups than downs for ya :)

  • http://www.hungryandfrozen.blogspot.com Laura @ Hungry and Frozen

    I’ve actually never tried eggnog, and while it has always seemed a little creepy, I guess it’s no worse than semifreddo or uncooked cake batter, both of which I eat with gusto. Your recipe looks seriously inviting. Hope 2010 has more ups than downs for ya :)

  • http://starchymarie.blogspot.com/ Marie

    I, for one, adore eggnog, but I have to admit I’ve only had the store-bought kind. I am too afraid to make it at home, which is silly, I know. Another dragon to slay in my kitchen, I suppose! Thanks for the holiday cheer post… I’m slowly getting into the swing of things, despite the CA weather!

  • http://starchymarie.blogspot.com Marie

    I, for one, adore eggnog, but I have to admit I’ve only had the store-bought kind. I am too afraid to make it at home, which is silly, I know. Another dragon to slay in my kitchen, I suppose! Thanks for the holiday cheer post… I’m slowly getting into the swing of things, despite the CA weather!

  • http://www.myfindsonline.com/ Amanda

    Mmm, now this sounds like it will warm you up on a cold winter night. I’ve never tried egg nog warm. I’m gonna give this recipe a whirl.

  • http://www.myfindsonline.com Amanda

    Mmm, now this sounds like it will warm you up on a cold winter night. I’ve never tried egg nog warm. I’m gonna give this recipe a whirl.

  • hanna

    I love homemade eggnog, hot or cold. And it’ll be the perfect thing to sip on and reminisce.

    This year has been a difficult one. I hope things look up in the coming year!

  • hanna

    I love homemade eggnog, hot or cold. And it’ll be the perfect thing to sip on and reminisce.

    This year has been a difficult one. I hope things look up in the coming year!

  • http://www.RecipeGirl.com/blog Lori @ RecipeGirl

    My nephew is a chef, and he was just telling me this weekend that I need to get an eggnog recipe on my site. This looks fabulous. I remember drinking eggnog as a teenager at a friend’s house for Thanksgiving. The excessive amount of eggs always freak me out a little bit too.

  • http://www.RecipeGirl.com/blog Lori @ RecipeGirl

    My nephew is a chef, and he was just telling me this weekend that I need to get an eggnog recipe on my site. This looks fabulous. I remember drinking eggnog as a teenager at a friend’s house for Thanksgiving. The excessive amount of eggs always freak me out a little bit too.

  • http://www.sassyradish.com/ radish

    LOVE warm eggnog :) but in my house, bourbon isn’t optional for it. I can’t wait to make it this season. Love your Bodum glasses for it too!

  • http://www.sassyradish.com radish

    LOVE warm eggnog :) but in my house, bourbon isn’t optional for it. I can’t wait to make it this season. Love your Bodum glasses for it too!

  • http://cheffresco.com/ cheffresco

    Mmm eggnog is soo tasty. Nice recipe & pics!

  • http://cheffresco.com cheffresco

    Mmm eggnog is soo tasty. Nice recipe & pics!

  • http://www.soyoufound.me/ joni

    I’ve never tried eggnog. Sounds nasty. And warm? I wonder how the egg doesn’t get cooked…

  • http://www.soyoufound.me joni

    I’ve never tried eggnog. Sounds nasty. And warm? I wonder how the egg doesn’t get cooked…

  • http://www.pastrychefonline.com/ Jenni

    Marc–I love this warm version. How fantastic. Next time, add some salt–I think it will put it right over the top, like boozy, warm vanilla pudding. And how could that be a bad thing?

    I’ve missed coming over here–craziness with my site reworking. Alas. Sounds like you had a lovely, low-key Thanksgiving:)

  • http://www.pastrychefonline.com/ Jenni

    Marc–I love this warm version. How fantastic. Next time, add some salt–I think it will put it right over the top, like boozy, warm vanilla pudding. And how could that be a bad thing?

    I’ve missed coming over here–craziness with my site reworking. Alas. Sounds like you had a lovely, low-key Thanksgiving:)

  • http://www.lovesfoodlovestoeat.blogspot.com/ Amber

    I’m a sucker for all those mistreated holiday goodies- mincemeat pie, fruitcake, and definitely eggnog! I just wanted to let you know that I’m interested in learning more about Blog Away Hunger for my blog, and that I love your site!

    Also, I tried out your crustless pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving this year, turned out fantastic! Rather than the cardamom (mom’s spice rack was lacking) I used cinnamon, orange zest, nutmeg, maple sugar, and cloves. I served it with a warm maple-rum sauce. Delish!

  • http://www.lovesfoodlovestoeat.blogspot.com Amber

    I’m a sucker for all those mistreated holiday goodies- mincemeat pie, fruitcake, and definitely eggnog! I just wanted to let you know that I’m interested in learning more about Blog Away Hunger for my blog, and that I love your site!

    Also, I tried out your crustless pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving this year, turned out fantastic! Rather than the cardamom (mom’s spice rack was lacking) I used cinnamon, orange zest, nutmeg, maple sugar, and cloves. I served it with a warm maple-rum sauce. Delish!

  • http://www.weareneverfull.com/ we are never full

    here’s to employment in 2010. for you, marc and for everyone (despite a 10% unemployment rate). i still live in fear of losing my job all the time – it’s a crappy position for all of us to feel so vulnerable. i’ve also been a bad friend blogger re: blog for hunger so i’m heading over to actually donate right now.

    as for the egg nog – i grew up w/ the non-alcoholic version from our local store – wawa (in the philly area). i used to LOVE when the first batches of egg nog came to the stores. it was soooo thick we used to dilute it with skim milk. my mom would add some alcohol but mine was virgin. i always wanted seconds and would soon get a bad stomach ache. but it was worth it.

  • http://www.weareneverfull.com we are never full

    here’s to employment in 2010. for you, marc and for everyone (despite a 10% unemployment rate). i still live in fear of losing my job all the time – it’s a crappy position for all of us to feel so vulnerable. i’ve also been a bad friend blogger re: blog for hunger so i’m heading over to actually donate right now.

    as for the egg nog – i grew up w/ the non-alcoholic version from our local store – wawa (in the philly area). i used to LOVE when the first batches of egg nog came to the stores. it was soooo thick we used to dilute it with skim milk. my mom would add some alcohol but mine was virgin. i always wanted seconds and would soon get a bad stomach ache. but it was worth it.

  • http://NoCounterspace.net/ Livia

    Just tried your recipe for its simplicity. It does exactly what you promised, and I think it ended up a little too light for what I was craving. But it was pleasingly simple, extravagantly foamy, and had just the right flavor.

    Thank you for sharing.

  • http://NoCounterspace.net Livia

    Just tried your recipe for its simplicity. It does exactly what you promised, and I think it ended up a little too light for what I was craving. But it was pleasingly simple, extravagantly foamy, and had just the right flavor.

    Thank you for sharing.

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  • Luana

    Wow just tried your recipe,so easy and amazing taste..Didn’t have bourbon so i replaced some of the cream with a tablespoon of brandy cream..

  • Luana

    Wow just tried your recipe,so easy and amazing taste..Didn’t have bourbon so i replaced some of the cream with a tablespoon of brandy cream..

  • http://patrickgibson.com/ Patrick Gibson

    Looks delicious! I notice the unit is missing beside the “1/2 Cream”. Could you clarify? I assume a cup, but just wanted to be sure. :)

  • http://patrickgibson.com/ Patrick Gibson

    Looks delicious! I notice the unit is missing beside the “1/2 Cream”. Could you clarify? I assume a cup, but just wanted to be sure. :)

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  • Guest

    Wow – the eggnog was delish (even better because I could make my single serving using a whisk and a microwave). Bonus: Your site is an over-the-top visual treat. Hope the opportunities in 2010 treated you to more income and pleasure than deprivation and frustration. -ck in ca

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  • Steve

    Hi there.
    I really fancy trying this but I don’t know what the unit of measurement C is? Could you advise please. To mitigate against my ignorance I just wanted to let you know that I’m from the other side of the pond.
    Thanks,
    Steve.

    • Anonymous

      No worries, C is short for cup. I’m not sure if you guys have the same
      cup measurements there that we do, but what’s important is the proportions,
      so as long as you’re using the same proportions you should be okay.

  • Steve

    Ah yes – Cups – of course. Thank you.

  • Steve

    Sorry – I think there is now something missing. 1 cup of half and half – what??

    • Anonymous

      Not sure if you get it out in the UK, but “half and half” is a mixture
      of half cream and half milk that they sell here in the US to add to
      coffee and tea. You can make it yourself by mixing milk and cream.

  • Helen

    How many servings does this make?

    • Anonymous

      2 servings

  • tania Chahoud

    i am reading the warm egg nog recipe, excuse my ignorance but what is half and half?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Half and half is a 50/50 mixture of milk and cream. If you live in the US,
      you should be able to pick up a pint of half and half at any supermarket.

  • Frogster

    I’ve been trying to find a quick, simple recipe for warm egg nog.  I’m afraid yours has too much verbiage. I have no idea what you mean by “bring 2 eggs up to room temperature”.  I keep my eggs at room temp all the time!  You do not say how many servings this recipe makes. I skipped all the bumph about Thanksgiving.  I just want to know how to make a good warm egg nog!  Sorry, thumbs down on this. 

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Not sure where you’re based, but in the US eggs need to
      be refrigerated because they’ve had the protective membranes stripped off of them by pressure washers before they’re sold.

      • james

        just what kind of membrane would you be refering to?  are you saying that if i got un-washed eggs i wouldnt have to refrigerate them? 

        • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

          I’m not a food safety expert so I’m not going to say what you should or shouldn’t do with your eggs, but in areas where the eggs aren’t washed, there’s a protective membrane called a cuticle that keeps bacteria from entering the egg, so many people leave their eggs unrefrigerated. In the US all eggs sold commercially must be washed, so unless you have chickens in your back yard you probably won’t find an unwashed egg.

    • http://runningjimi.wordpress.com/ Jimi Oke

      To each his/her own, I guess. I, for one, am not a fan of recipes that are merely a list of ingredients followed by mechanical step-by-step instructions. Cooking is all about the spirit, not the letter. It’s always nice to read the author’s thoughts and side-stories along the way. And I think the context is inescapable. Regardless of where in the world (or the US) you are from, bringing eggs to room temperature is always part of standard recipe-speak. Eggs have been refrigerated since the 50s all over the world. Even if you buy them unwashed, it’s always recommended to wash and then refrigerate. So, please, stop being nitpicky and give the author some well-deserved credit for this fantastic post.

  • l.holmes128

    Thia sounds a lovley easy recipe. i am from the uk and have never tasted or made eggnogg. Is braandy the usual alchohol in eggnogg? A quicke question is cream the double pouring cream? Thank you ; xx

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      You can really use just about any alcohol, but traditionally it’s made with Rum or Brandy. Personally I like using Scotch Whiskey or Bourbon. As for the cream, it’s the pourable kind of cream (not clotted). Hope that helps!

  • AndreaMichelle

    This recipe was great! Thank you! My boyfriend loved it! However, I added extra nutmeg into the egg nog mixture and sprinkled cinammon on top instead of the nutmeg.
    Thank you for your recipe! :)

  • fugarte171

    My mother-in-law (from Lima, Peru) called this Caspiroleta — a sure cure for the flu!  Your method by using a blender makes it so much easier.  I can’t wait to try it with the nutmeg.  Thanks for a great recipe!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Fascinating! I just looked it up on wikipedia and while my Spanish is a little rusty, it sounds very similar. It sounds like it’s a beverage only consumed in latin america, so I wonder if it developed independently or if it had its roots in Europe.

  • Vince

    How long can this stay warm if I make a larger batch of this warm egg nog and do you have any suggestions for keeping it warm?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Because it contains eggs (another other perishable ingredients), I would not recommend keeping it warm as any temperature hot enough to ward off bacterial growth would set the egg proteins. This is a make and drink kind of beverage.

  • RaspberryFrog

    Just made hot egggnog, to cook out the eggs, for the children. Only the USA could make drinking alcoholic custard an art form.

  • http://www.facebook.com/martina.franzen.9 Martina Franzen

    Hello and merry x-mas from Germany …. ty very much for this wonderful recipe … i didnt have a blender so i made it in my bain marie and i have to say its so rich and creamy that i couldnt end to go back and steal the next cup ^^… tomorrow i will try to make a chocolate eggnog for my children :))
    greetings
    Tina Franzen

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Sounds great!

      • http://www.facebook.com/martina.franzen.9 Martina Franzen

        sry for delay … but i didnt noticed that someone replied ^^… all i can say is that the chocolate eggnog based on this recipe was a HIT …. i made it for the whole class of my daughter and all wanted to know the recipe ^^…

  • josah

    Don’t ever let this page die–you’ve got the best warm eggnog recipe on the internet, mister. 8)

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I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques and give you the confidence and inspiration so that you can cook without recipes too!