Osechi Ryori (Japanese New Year’s Food)

I’ve written about Japanese New Year’s traditions and I’ve even posted some typical Japanese New Year’s dishes. But this year I decided to go whole hog and make an Osechi Jubako from scratch.

You’d think after my recent ramen post (which was nearly a decade in the making), I’d be done with insanely time consuming Japanese food for a while, but I couldn’t resist the urge to share with you the New Year’s food of my people (that, and this project started off as a misguided effort to save some money.)

Osechi Ryori (お節料理) is a subset of Japanese cuisine made up of dishes that are traditionally eaten on Oshogatsu (New Year’s). Since it was historically taboo to cook on New Year’s day, Osechi dishes are typically stewed with lots of sugar, or they are vinegared to preserve them. There’s a huge variety of dishes, each one, a symbolic wish for things like long life, wealth, fertility, and happiness. The food is then meticulously plated in a 2-3 tiered lacquered box called a jubako, which the whole family eats from. Since I was trying to save some money, I went with a cheap plastic dish that’s intended to be used for serving cold soba.

But enough talk, here’s what was in this year’s osechi:

Gobo Kobumaki (昆布巻) – Burdock root wrapped in kombu, tied with kanpyo (a kind of gourd) and simmered in niboshi dashi. Burdock is a very long root that symbolizes the Japanese ideal of a life, long and stable. This preparation also represents joy, as “kobu” sounds like “yorokobu” which means joyful.

Renkon no Nitsuke (レンコンの煮付け) – Lotus root cut like chrysanthemums then fried and simmered in a sweet soy sauce. The many holes in it allow us to look through to the year ahead.

Kikuka Kabu (菊花蕪) – This is a whole baby turnip cut to look like a chrysanthemum flower that’s then pickled in vinegar, salt and sugar with some chili pepper in the middle. The chrysanthemum is the symbol of the emperor and is used to mark joyous occasions.

Pirikara Konnyaku (ピリ辛コンニャク)- Konnyaku (yam jelly) simmered in a sweet and spicy sauce.

Nimono (煮物) – Fresh baby taro, carrots carved like plum blossoms, and shiitake mushrooms simmered in a katsuo/kombu dashi. The shape of the carrots in this dish is symbolic in that every plum flower bears one fruit, making this another wish for fertility.

Kuri Kinton (栗金飩) – Sweetened and mashed Japanese sweet potatoes with sweet chestnuts. The characters for kinton literally mean “group of gold”, so with the golden color of this sweet, it represents a wish for wealth and financial success in the new year.

Ebi no Shioyaki (エビの塩焼き) – I brined these giant shrimp in a 50/50 salt sugar mixture for 5 minutes before grilling on a stove top fish grill. The shape of the shrimp is similar to that of an older person and represents longevity.

Kazunoko (数の子) – Herring roe seasoned in katsuo/kombu dashi and soy sauce. These crunchy roe sacs each contain thousands of eggs and symbolize a wish for fertility.

Kamaboko (蒲鉾) – The quintessential pink and white Japanese fishcakes are traditionally sliced and layered in alternating rows of pink and white. While it’s a stretch to say that pink and red are the same color, the bands of “red” and white kamaboko are supposed to symbolize the rising sun. I had big plans for doing some elaborate carving here, but after hand carving a dozen carrots in the shape of plum blossoms, I decided to go with a simple slice.

Datemaki (伊達巻) – These sweet golden rounds of egg and hanpen (fishcake), have a ribbed outer surface mimicking the shining sun, a wish for sunny days ahead.

Kuromame (黒豆) – Large black soybeans simmered with sugar and soy sauce. Aside from being full of nutrients, this dish also symbolizes good health, as “mame” which means bean, sounds like another word that means hard work and good health. Recipe &#187

Ikura (イクラ) – Seasoned salmon roe. In addition to being an auspicious shade of red, the eggs represent fertility.

Tazukuri (田作り) – Baby dried anchovies are roasted and coated with sweet caramelized soy sauce and sesame seeds. Tazukuri, which literally translates to “making rice fields” symbolizes a bountiful harvest.

Kohaku Namasu (紅白なます) – Red and white vinegared daikon. This dish is traditionally made with carrots and daikon, but I decided to mix it up a bit and used pomegranate seeds instead of carrots, and replaced the sugar that usually goes into it with mandarin juice. The combination of red and white is a recurring theme in many osechi dishes and symbolizes happiness and celebration.

Finally, no oshogatsu meal would be complete without o-zoni (お雑煮), a ubiquitous soup with rice cake that has about as many variations as there are cities in Japan. Everything from the stock, to the seasoning to the stuff that’s inside varies, but one common thread is that it always has a piece of mochi (sticky rice cake) inside. For my version, I took some dashi taken from katsuo, kombu, and shiitake and simmered some nankotsu (chicken cartilage) in it for several hours, I seasoned it with soy sauce and mirin, then added ribbons of daikon, and of course, a toasted square of mochi.

What are some of your culture’s New Year’s traditions?

I’ll be posting recipes for some of these throughout 2010 and linking to them here, so if you want to make your own osechi to celebrate 2011, bookmark this page and come back in December for all the recipes.

  • http://www.obviouslyomnivore.com/ Xai

    whaaaaaa?!?!?! this looks amazing and delicate. i bet it tastes amazing too. the colors are so vibrant. i would love to have a bowl of this any day!

  • http://www.obviouslyomnivore.com Xai

    whaaaaaa?!?!?! this looks amazing and delicate. i bet it tastes amazing too. the colors are so vibrant. i would love to have a bowl of this any day!

  • http://wasabiprime.blogspot.com/ wasabi prime

    Absolutely amazing. Fortune smiles upon those who go through the efforts to make such a beautiful meal. I’ve never made this, just been lucky to enjoy the fruits of others’ labors on New Year’s. The most effort I’ll go through is mochi and this year I just stuck with my mom’s simple mochi custard bars! Beautiful, beautiful post. Thank you for sharing this amazing meal!

  • http://wasabiprime.blogspot.com wasabi prime

    Absolutely amazing. Fortune smiles upon those who go through the efforts to make such a beautiful meal. I’ve never made this, just been lucky to enjoy the fruits of others’ labors on New Year’s. The most effort I’ll go through is mochi and this year I just stuck with my mom’s simple mochi custard bars! Beautiful, beautiful post. Thank you for sharing this amazing meal!

  • http://devourtheworld.blogspot.com/ jenjenk

    In the words of the ladies of the hahanokai at my community center, SUBARASHII!!! That is so visually stunning!!! I hope you share on how you cut & etched the carrots!!

  • http://devourtheworld.blogspot.com jenjenk

    In the words of the ladies of the hahanokai at my community center, SUBARASHII!!! That is so visually stunning!!! I hope you share on how you cut & etched the carrots!!

  • http://weelicious.com/ Weelicious

    Gorgeous! Was all that time worth it?

    • marc

      Mmm hard to say. I guess it was one of the better osechi meals I’ve ever had, but part of the fun of eating osechi is all the little surprises you find in the jubako, and since I put it all together, there were no surprises for me.

  • http://weelicious.com Weelicious

    Gorgeous! Was all that time worth it?

    • marc

      Mmm hard to say. I guess it was one of the better osechi meals I’ve ever had, but part of the fun of eating osechi is all the little surprises you find in the jubako, and since I put it all together, there were no surprises for me.

  • http://www.lafujimama.com/ Fuji Mama

    GORGEOUS! So sad to have missed out on all the osechi ryori fun this year. I have especially large soft spot for ozoni and kuri-kinton.

  • http://www.lafujimama.com Fuji Mama

    GORGEOUS! So sad to have missed out on all the osechi ryori fun this year. I have especially large soft spot for ozoni and kuri-kinton.

  • http://cookingbytheseatofmypants.com/ Jerry (CBSOP)

    That is absolutely GORGEOUS. I understand the “misguided effort” part at the beginning. I made the same mistake with an antipasto platter one year. It ended up costing more than the entrees for a group of 9.

    Happy New Year!

  • http://cookingbytheseatofmypants.com Jerry (CBSOP)

    That is absolutely GORGEOUS. I understand the “misguided effort” part at the beginning. I made the same mistake with an antipasto platter one year. It ended up costing more than the entrees for a group of 9.

    Happy New Year!

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com/ pigpigscorner

    Such beautiful presentation! looks so delicate and delicious! Happy 2010!

  • http://www.pigpigscorner.com pigpigscorner

    Such beautiful presentation! looks so delicate and delicious! Happy 2010!

  • http://blog.lemonpi.net/ Y

    Amazing. I had no idea about this tradition, and love the symbolism behind each component. It looks beautiful AND rather tasty too.

  • http://blog.lemonpi.net Y

    Amazing. I had no idea about this tradition, and love the symbolism behind each component. It looks beautiful AND rather tasty too.

  • http://www.hollyhadsellentertaining.com/ Holly

    Looks wonderful. Happy New Year. Can’t wait to see the recipes.

  • http://www.hollyhadsellentertaining.com/ Holly

    Looks wonderful. Happy New Year. Can’t wait to see the recipes.

  • http://islandgirlok.com/ Vivian

    So beautifully done. Thank you for sharing this with us. Love the Nimono, so intricate and beautifully carved.

  • http://islandgirlok.com Vivian

    So beautifully done. Thank you for sharing this with us. Love the Nimono, so intricate and beautifully carved.

  • http://tokyoterrace.com/ Tokyo Terrace

    This looks so beautiful! I am now wishing that I would have planned far enough in advance to do something like this. What a great accomplishment! I love the addition of the pomegranate seeds for a unique twist. The color really pops and brings something beautiful and fresh to the presentation. Fabulous job!!

  • http://tokyoterrace.com Tokyo Terrace

    This looks so beautiful! I am now wishing that I would have planned far enough in advance to do something like this. What a great accomplishment! I love the addition of the pomegranate seeds for a unique twist. The color really pops and brings something beautiful and fresh to the presentation. Fabulous job!!

  • http://www.shesimmers.com/ Leela@SheSimmers

    I am prostrating myself in your awesome presence, refusing to look up for fear of being blinded by the glory of your talent.
    This is the kind of stuff that my ancestors hoped I would be able to do. Well, they hoped wrong.

    If you haven’t already, you should do a post on how to carve vegetables the Japanese way, Marc. Really.

  • http://www.shesimmers.com Leela@SheSimmers

    I am prostrating myself in your awesome presence, refusing to look up for fear of being blinded by the glory of your talent.
    This is the kind of stuff that my ancestors hoped I would be able to do. Well, they hoped wrong.

    If you haven’t already, you should do a post on how to carve vegetables the Japanese way, Marc. Really.

  • http://www.shesimmers.com/ Leela@SheSimmers

    Shoot. Forgot to answer the question. The Thai new year is celebrated in April based on the Theravada astrological calendar. We smear each other with fragrant chalky stuff and throw water at each other. Why? Long story. We’re not weird, we’re just trying to relieve the pain of extreme heat and humidity in style.

  • http://www.shesimmers.com Leela@SheSimmers

    Shoot. Forgot to answer the question. The Thai new year is celebrated in April based on the Theravada astrological calendar. We smear each other with fragrant chalky stuff and throw water at each other. Why? Long story. We’re not weird, we’re just trying to relieve the pain of extreme heat and humidity in style.

  • A

    This looks amazing. In my family the New Year’s tradition is to go to no effort at all, because of all the cooking that takes place in December.

  • A

    This looks amazing. In my family the New Year’s tradition is to go to no effort at all, because of all the cooking that takes place in December.

  • http://souvlakiforthesoul.com/ Peter G

    Wow! What an in depth look at Japanese New year foods…I’m amazed at all the symbolism…wonderful Marc!

  • http://souvlakiforthesoul.com Peter G

    Wow! What an in depth look at Japanese New year foods…I’m amazed at all the symbolism…wonderful Marc!

  • jk

    Great post! I liked the explanations about the symbolism. Next time, get a jubako for it. Gives you more room to “use up” all the extra food.

  • jk

    Great post! I liked the explanations about the symbolism. Next time, get a jubako for it. Gives you more room to “use up” all the extra food.

  • http://www.eatandbehappy.wordpress.com/ thecoffeesnob

    Wow! It looks incredible with all that colour and texture! I love how symbolic each and every ingredient is.

    We’ve never really done much to celebrate the new year as all our energy’s sapped by time the new year arrives thanks to Christmas :)

  • http://www.eatandbehappy.wordpress.com thecoffeesnob

    Wow! It looks incredible with all that colour and texture! I love how symbolic each and every ingredient is.

    We’ve never really done much to celebrate the new year as all our energy’s sapped by time the new year arrives thanks to Christmas :)

  • http://eleanorhoh.blogspot.com/ Eleanor Hoh (wokstar)

    Amazing and exquisite accomplishment! Thanks for sharing.

  • http://eleanorhoh.blogspot.com Eleanor Hoh (wokstar)

    Amazing and exquisite accomplishment! Thanks for sharing.

  • http://www.gourmetfury.com/ Melody Fury

    That looks incredibly gorgeous! Happy new year, Marc :) I especially love how the lotus root is carved.

  • http://www.gourmetfury.com Melody Fury

    That looks incredibly gorgeous! Happy new year, Marc :) I especially love how the lotus root is carved.

  • http://www.openkyoto.com/ Michael [KyotoFoodie]

    Hello Marc ちゃん!

    明けましておめでとうございます。本年もどうぞ宜しくお願いします。

    Happy New Year to you!

    You went totally whole hog and made osechi from scratch! That is pretty serious. I am afraid that you out-foodie me.

    I did a pretty cool article on French kaiseki osechi this year which you might find of interest.

    http://kyotofoodie.com/restaurant-okumura-french-osechi/

    I do have a really great Japanese New Year’s custom. I get up and have uni and ikura donburi with a bottle of Veuve Clicquot for breakfast, and then go back to bed. It is essential to spend like $30 each on both the uni and ikura.

    I hope that you and all your readers have a happy and delicious 2010!

    Best, Michael

  • http://www.openkyoto.com Michael [KyotoFoodie]

    Hello Marc ちゃん!

    明けましておめでとうございます。本年もどうぞ宜しくお願いします。

    Happy New Year to you!

    You went totally whole hog and made osechi from scratch! That is pretty serious. I am afraid that you out-foodie me.

    I did a pretty cool article on French kaiseki osechi this year which you might find of interest.

    http://kyotofoodie.com/restaurant-okumura-french-osechi/

    I do have a really great Japanese New Year’s custom. I get up and have uni and ikura donburi with a bottle of Veuve Clicquot for breakfast, and then go back to bed. It is essential to spend like $30 each on both the uni and ikura.

    I hope that you and all your readers have a happy and delicious 2010!

    Best, Michael

  • http://hotpinkmanolo.livejournal.com/ Hot Pink Manolos

    AAH! You beat me to it! I was going to post about my family’s osechi ryori, but I haven’t had time! Oh well! Post will still be up soon since my obasan makes the best o-zoni.

    But I’m going to have to say, your presentation takes the cake!

    Akemashite omedetou gozaimasu!!

  • http://hotpinkmanolo.livejournal.com Hot Pink Manolos

    AAH! You beat me to it! I was going to post about my family’s osechi ryori, but I haven’t had time! Oh well! Post will still be up soon since my obasan makes the best o-zoni.

    But I’m going to have to say, your presentation takes the cake!

    Akemashite omedetou gozaimasu!!

  • http://trissalicious.com/ Trissa

    That seems like a very very involved process but the end results are amazing! Great pictures and write up – I’ll have to share this with my Japanese friend and ask her to make it for me one day!

  • http://trissalicious.com Trissa

    That seems like a very very involved process but the end results are amazing! Great pictures and write up – I’ll have to share this with my Japanese friend and ask her to make it for me one day!

  • http://www.whatdoiwant2cooktoday.blogspot.com/ Jan

    Marc this looks amazing – I am lost for words! What a fantastic job you’ve done!!
    I would LOVE to try this but I have not a chance at making mine looks anywhere near as good.
    A Very Happy 2010 to you and your family x

  • http://www.whatdoiwant2cooktoday.blogspot.com Jan

    Marc this looks amazing – I am lost for words! What a fantastic job you’ve done!!
    I would LOVE to try this but I have not a chance at making mine looks anywhere near as good.
    A Very Happy 2010 to you and your family x

  • http://deltakitchen.blogspot.com/ Andreas

    Wow, very involved preparations for New Years Day.
    Thanks for explaining the underlying symbolism.
    I second the request for a tutorial on cutting techniques. :)

    In Germany (at least in the part I come from) there’s a tradition of making large pretzels from a sweet, yeasted dough (like one would use for Challah).

  • http://deltakitchen.blogspot.com/ Andreas

    Wow, very involved preparations for New Years Day.
    Thanks for explaining the underlying symbolism.
    I second the request for a tutorial on cutting techniques. :)

    In Germany (at least in the part I come from) there’s a tradition of making large pretzels from a sweet, yeasted dough (like one would use for Challah).

  • Rakhi

    Gorgeous looking dish! It must taste as good as it looks. :)

  • Rakhi

    Gorgeous looking dish! It must taste as good as it looks. :)

  • http://www.bigboldbeautifulfood.blogspot.com/ Ninette

    Oh my, these are drop dead photos, Marc. What a lovely way to enter the new year. When I lived in Japan, I certainly don’t remember eating such a wonderful dish, although I did get to pound mochi outside.

  • http://www.bigboldbeautifulfood.blogspot.com Ninette

    Oh my, these are drop dead photos, Marc. What a lovely way to enter the new year. When I lived in Japan, I certainly don’t remember eating such a wonderful dish, although I did get to pound mochi outside.

  • http://foodalogue.com/ Joan Nova

    Stunning! I hope some day to have the opportunity to try this (eat, not prepare!). Great job, Marc. Happy new year!

  • http://foodalogue.com Joan Nova

    Stunning! I hope some day to have the opportunity to try this (eat, not prepare!). Great job, Marc. Happy new year!

  • http://colloquialcooking.com/ Colloquial Cook

    [crawling back on my chair missing a couple of teeth after visual shockwave slapped me in the face][hard]

    Errr – errr *WOW*

    I think that beats hands down my birthday choucroute. My dish was large, but then again, it was only pork and cabbage. Only you could make this crazy project happen. Besides you kick ass at sculpting flowers out of carrots. I want a masterclass.

    Bonne année Marc!

  • http://colloquialcooking.com Colloquial Cook

    [crawling back on my chair missing a couple of teeth after visual shockwave slapped me in the face][hard]

    Errr – errr *WOW*

    I think that beats hands down my birthday choucroute. My dish was large, but then again, it was only pork and cabbage. Only you could make this crazy project happen. Besides you kick ass at sculpting flowers out of carrots. I want a masterclass.

    Bonne année Marc!

  • http://www.pastrychefonline.com/ Jenni

    How gorgeous! I hope the New Year is every bit as bright and wonderful as your osechi plate, Marc:)

  • http://www.pastrychefonline.com/ Jenni

    How gorgeous! I hope the New Year is every bit as bright and wonderful as your osechi plate, Marc:)

  • http://foodmayhem.com/ Jessica@FoodMayhem

    This is beautiful, particularly the carrots carved as plum blossoms.

  • http://foodmayhem.com Jessica@FoodMayhem

    This is beautiful, particularly the carrots carved as plum blossoms.

  • http://www.veggiebelly.com/ Veggie Belly

    I just love lotus root! Gorgeous pictures. Happy New year!

  • http://www.veggiebelly.com Veggie Belly

    I just love lotus root! Gorgeous pictures. Happy New year!

  • http://allthingsnice.typepad.com/ Syrie

    Marc. this is incredible. A wonderful post and so interesting and informative. Happy New year. I hope it’s a good one for you. Syrie

  • http://allthingsnice.typepad.com Syrie

    Marc. this is incredible. A wonderful post and so interesting and informative. Happy New year. I hope it’s a good one for you. Syrie

  • http://frenchcookingfordummies.com/ French Cooking for Dummies

    What an interesting post! I love Japanese cooking, everything looks gorgeous! Happy 2010, Marc :-D

  • http://frenchcookingfordummies.com/ French Cooking for Dummies

    What an interesting post! I love Japanese cooking, everything looks gorgeous! Happy 2010, Marc :-D

  • http://dodol-mochi.blogspot.com/ Pei-Lin

    Yes, I’ve heard about this! I do make Japanese food to eat pretty often as we are huge Japanese food fans! Have yet to try these though … But, my next project is okonomiyaki … I think …

    Talk about my culture’s … Hmm … That’ll make me sound really long-winded … Since Chinese New Year is coming … I think I’m going to share it with all others when the time comes … Thanks for sharing!

    Love your writing, keep it up!

  • http://dodol-mochi.blogspot.com/ Pei-Lin

    Yes, I’ve heard about this! I do make Japanese food to eat pretty often as we are huge Japanese food fans! Have yet to try these though … But, my next project is okonomiyaki … I think …

    Talk about my culture’s … Hmm … That’ll make me sound really long-winded … Since Chinese New Year is coming … I think I’m going to share it with all others when the time comes … Thanks for sharing!

    Love your writing, keep it up!

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  • http://www.atablefortwo.com.au/ billy@ATFT

    I am glad to find your blog through Peter G’s. I am loving it, will take me some time to go through it all! This osechi ryori looks too pretty to be eaten!

  • http://www.atablefortwo.com.au billy@ATFT

    I am glad to find your blog through Peter G’s. I am loving it, will take me some time to go through it all! This osechi ryori looks too pretty to be eaten!

  • http://www.foodgal.com/ Carolyn Jung

    I tell ya — this is one reason I wish I had been born Japanese (as opposed to Chinese). ;)

    Happy New Year to you! May it 2010 be filled with deliciousness.

  • http://www.foodgal.com Carolyn Jung

    I tell ya — this is one reason I wish I had been born Japanese (as opposed to Chinese). ;)

    Happy New Year to you! May it 2010 be filled with deliciousness.

  • http://gastronomyblog.com/ Gastronomer

    Wow wow wow! Great job, Marc! I am very impressed!!

  • http://gastronomyblog.com Gastronomer

    Wow wow wow! Great job, Marc! I am very impressed!!

  • http://ktfrek.wordpress.com/ Katie

    that is lovely. what a gorgeous way to celebrate new years!

  • http://ktfrek.wordpress.com Katie

    that is lovely. what a gorgeous way to celebrate new years!

  • http://dokuzuncubulut.com/ dokuzuncubulut

    Beautiful presentation. What a pretty dish!

  • http://dokuzuncubulut.com dokuzuncubulut

    Beautiful presentation. What a pretty dish!

  • K

    looks really really pretty and appetizing!
    You need to try top chef!

  • K

    looks really really pretty and appetizing!
    You need to try top chef!

  • http://zencancook.com/ zenchef

    Marc.. you’re a madman!!

    I was still in Aspen when i read this post and it left me so speechless that i couldn’t find anything to say in the comments. Well, i still can’t. lol

    Bravo!!

  • http://zencancook.com zenchef

    Marc.. you’re a madman!!

    I was still in Aspen when i read this post and it left me so speechless that i couldn’t find anything to say in the comments. Well, i still can’t. lol

    Bravo!!

  • Aristides

    So beautiful!

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  • Rose

    Wow what an incredible feast! Do you plan on doing it again this year? Here in Seattle we have a store called Uwajimaya and they sell individual osechi each year for those who order them in advanced. I ordered two once and they were just ok. Then again I didn’t undestand the meaning behind the food and how it should be eaten. Then I moved to Japan and had osechi with a family I had become very good friends with and everything tasted amazing!!!

  • Ahiro53

    I am glad that there are people willing to share traditional recipes with those of us who want to keep our culture alive. My mother passed down several recipes to me before she passed away 10 years ago. I have continued to serve them throughout the years.

    Unfortunately, I do not have as much time to make the elaborate dishes as I would like, but I encourage everyone to try one or two. If one is not able to prepare them, then the next best thing is to go out to eat at a great Japanese restaurant.

  • http://twitter.com/stacey509wines Stacey Fujimura

    These photos and dishes are amazing! Happy New Year!
    From Stacey509wines

  • vernon the gardener

    thanks for the info, I always wondered what the food meant,,,,,,Happy New Year 2011,ate my osechi ryori today

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  • Jeri howland

    I’m overwhelmed by the details and the variety! Thank you for sharing the traditions, your versions, and the beautiful photos. I feel I’ve taken a crash course and would even consider a taste of it all!!

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  • http://hizonscatering.com/ philippine catering services

    I really love japanese food sugui oishi desu! This menu is fantastic,It sure will help everyone who’s looking for a perfect menu like this. Thank you for sharing this recipe.This

  • Connie

    I was researching osechi-ryori for an creative writing paper, when I stumbled upon your article. I was amazed. Everything looks gorgeous. I want to thank you for taking the time to not only make this impressive feast, but for sharing it.
    You have brought back memories of my childhood. I rarely celebrate the New Year this way any more. But I still have joyful memories from the past and the photos of your exquisite dishes have brought them back so vividly; I can almost taste the them again right now. Thanks again!

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1438551270 Jessica Lucinda Williams

    the dishes look gorgeous! and everyone knows you eat with your eyes first! yummy!

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  • Glutzygien

    This is an interesting example of preparation and knife skills exemplified by the Japanese cuisine ;-)

Welcome!

I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques and give you the confidence and inspiration so that you can cook without recipes too!

Karasumi and Daikon Pasta
Hamachi wrapped in ramp kimchi
Yakisoba
Sesame Soba Salad
Uni with Yuzu Gelée
Yuzu Kosho (Yuzu Chili Paste)
New Years in Tokyo (Oshogatsu)
Honey Lemon Chicken