Char Siu (Chinese BBQ Pork)

Char Siu (a.k.a. cha shu, cha siew, chashao, barbecue pork)

Take a stroll through any Chinatown in the world and you’re bound to see restaurants with strips of red char siu hanging from hooks in the windows. Char siu literally means “fork burned” which is a reference to the traditional preparation, skewered and barbecued over a fire. While you may not have had a chance to try it over rice or in noodle soup, you’ve probably had it chopped up in pork buns (char siu bao) at one point or other.

At its best, char siu is moist and flavorful on the inside and caramelized and slightly chewy on the outside, with a sweet aroma redolent of five-spice and garlic. Unfortunately, at many establishments (in the NY Chinatown), it’s overly sweet, grisly, artificially colored meat that’s been hanging under a heatlamp for hours.

In an effort to right the injustice done to this dish at many places, I set out to make my own Char Siu at home. Not some vaguely char-siu-like impostor, but a moist flavorful hunk of meat with the trademark deep mahogany color. I also wanted to do it without the addition of any weird additives like food coloring, msg, or ketchup.

I started by making my own 5 spice powder last week. Then I let my first batch marinate for 3 days and did a 2 temperature roast with the skin still on. This was a good start, but despite the very long soak, it wasn’t as well seasoned as I would have liked and the glaze wasn’t quite sweet enough. The skin also started burning before it has a chance to crisp, so I decided it needed a second pass before I posted. I fixed it on the second attempt by removing the skin, adding more soy sauce and maltose and roasting at a lower temperature before raising the temperature to char the edges.

Char Siu Fan (Chinese BBQ Pork Over Rice) with Steamed Choy Sum

Char siu is great on top of some rice with the remaining marinade boiled down into a sauce. It’s also fantastic on top of noodle soups and in fried rice. If you feel daring, you can chop it up and make your own char siu bau (pork buns). What’s your favorite way to eat char siu?

Here are a few notes/tips on the ingredients:

  • For the pork belly, try to get pork belly that’s leaner that what you’d get for braising. Ideally you’ll have thick layers of very marbled meat with thin strips of fat in between. You could also use pork shoulder, but I prefer pork belly for the extra fat content. Whatever you do, please don’t make this a pork loin (you’ll end up with pork jerky).
  • Shaoxing is a dark brown cooking wine you can pick up in most asian groceries, but if you can’t find it, sherry makes a pretty good substitute.
  • I’ll admit that Thai chili sauce isn’t exactly authentic, but I like the mild sweet garlicky heat it provides.
  • Chinese dark soy sauce is actually a key component (I used Pearl River Bridge brand). It is much darker than the more common Japanese dark soy sauce and is more viscous. I’m fairly certain that this is were the red color comes from, so it’s probably not a good idea to substitute in something else if you can find it.
  • Maltose is a malt sugar that’s made from barley. It is extremely viscous and sticky with a smooth texture like very cold honey. It’s not as sweet as honey, but because of its viscosity it helps make the marinade stick to the pork and imparts a malty flavour. You can usually find it in asian groceries, and I love just sticking a clean chopstick into the jar, twirling it around until I have a little lollipop of maltose and sucking on it.

Equipment you'll need:

1.5 pound piece pork belly

for marinade
1/2 teaspoon 5 spice powder
2 tablespoons maltose (or honey)
2 tablespoons Shaoxing cooking wine (or sherry)
1 tablespoon hoisin sauce
1 tablespoon thai chili sauce
1 tablespoon Chinese dark soy sauce
1 tablespoon kiwi, pureed
2 teaspoons oyster sauce
2 cloves garlic, grated

Mix the ingredients for the marinade together in a Ziploc bag. The maltose is a little tough to incorporate but it’s okay if there are some lumps as these will eventually dissolve, just make sure there are no big clumps.

If your pork belly has skin, use a sharp knife to remove it. Add the pork belly to the marinade and push out as much air as possible so the meat is completely surrounded by marinade. Let it sit in the fridge for at least 2 days, flipping the bag over every to ensure it’s evenly marinated.

To roast your char siu, preheat the oven to 275 degrees F and move the rack to the upper middle position. Set an elevated wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet and lay the marinated pork belly on the rack, saving the marinade for later. Put the pan in the oven and let it roast for 1 hour or until the meat reaches an internal temperature of 160 degrees F. Remove the pan from the oven, then move the oven rack to the top position and turn the heat up to “broil”.

Baste the pork with the reserved marinade, then broil it until dark and glossy with the edges just slightly charred. Flip the meat over and baste again, allowing the second side to color and char as well.

Slice your finished char siu and serve with rice or noodles.

  • http://shelbymaelawstories.blogspot.com/2008/11/peanut-blossoms.html HoneyB

    This looks so awesome. You could serve this at my house anytime!!

  • http://shelbymaelawstories.blogspot.com/2008/11/peanut-blossoms.html HoneyB

    This looks so awesome. You could serve this at my house anytime!!

  • http://www.mattwallaert.com/ matt

    As the resident friend-expert on eating this stuff (considering that I consume it approximately five times a week), I’m still waiting for Marc to actually bring me some so I can render a verdict. The problem with his being such a damn good cook is that now the bar is set high: I’ll expect nothing less than amazing. *grins*

  • http://www.mattwallaert.com matt

    As the resident friend-expert on eating this stuff (considering that I consume it approximately five times a week), I’m still waiting for Marc to actually bring me some so I can render a verdict. The problem with his being such a damn good cook is that now the bar is set high: I’ll expect nothing less than amazing. *grins*

  • http://www.redcook.net Kian

    Marc, That looks absolutely wonderful. Char siu is such a daily comfort food that it often gets lost in Chinese cooking repertoire. There is nothing more pleasing than a great char siu fan, or char siu over rice, to satisfy a lunch or late night hunger.

  • http://www.redcook.net Kian

    Marc, That looks absolutely wonderful. Char siu is such a daily comfort food that it often gets lost in Chinese cooking repertoire. There is nothing more pleasing than a great char siu fan, or char siu over rice, to satisfy a lunch or late night hunger.

  • http://www.souvlakiforthesoul.com/ Peter G

    Char siu is the king of pork dishes!…looks delicious.

  • http://www.souvlakiforthesoul.com Peter G

    Char siu is the king of pork dishes!…looks delicious.

  • mengmeng

    Marc! Is it a little weird/a lot creepy that I found this site? If it is, I don’t care, because this is amazing!! You should be on Top Chef or something…I’d totally watch.

  • mengmeng

    Marc! Is it a little weird/a lot creepy that I found this site? If it is, I don’t care, because this is amazing!! You should be on Top Chef or something…I’d totally watch.

  • http://takeitlikeit.blogspot.com/ Brooke

    This looks amazing!

  • http://takeitlikeit.blogspot.com/ Brooke

    This looks amazing!

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com/ Manggy

    Oh, I didn’t know it required dark soy sauce! I always have a difficult time finding that. But yours look quite good, and with a unique Thai touch too! :)
    My favorite way to have it is in a steamed bun of course, but a rice meal with this and steamed bok choi is always welcome :)

  • http://manggy.blogspot.com Manggy

    Oh, I didn’t know it required dark soy sauce! I always have a difficult time finding that. But yours look quite good, and with a unique Thai touch too! :)
    My favorite way to have it is in a steamed bun of course, but a rice meal with this and steamed bok choi is always welcome :)

  • Carey

    mmmm Char siu bao was one of my childhood favorites! My mom used to keep frozen ones on hand and on special days she would steam one, wrap it in tin foil, and tuck it into my lunch box for school. I never thought about trying to make it myself, but I think I’ll give it a try now! Do you have any good bao recipes?

  • Carey

    mmmm Char siu bao was one of my childhood favorites! My mom used to keep frozen ones on hand and on special days she would steam one, wrap it in tin foil, and tuck it into my lunch box for school. I never thought about trying to make it myself, but I think I’ll give it a try now! Do you have any good bao recipes?

  • http://www.notquitenigella.com/ Lorraine E

    That looks amazing. Luckily it’s almost dinner time here of I’d be shaking my fist at you for making me so hungry! :P Great pics too!

  • http://www.notquitenigella.com Lorraine E

    That looks amazing. Luckily it’s almost dinner time here of I’d be shaking my fist at you for making me so hungry! :P Great pics too!

  • http://www.rasamalaysia.com/ Rasa Malaysia

    Served with dry wonton noodles, ala Malaysia style…

    Your char siu looks absolutely delicious, I have been thinking to make it but too lazy. :)

  • http://www.rasamalaysia.com Rasa Malaysia

    Served with dry wonton noodles, ala Malaysia style…

    Your char siu looks absolutely delicious, I have been thinking to make it but too lazy. :)

  • http://chezannies.blogspot.com/ Nate

    We did a no-bake char siew recently that came out pretty good – and left some seriously tasty sauce. But baking would have made for some nice crispy bits.

  • http://chezannies.blogspot.com Nate

    We did a no-bake char siew recently that came out pretty good – and left some seriously tasty sauce. But baking would have made for some nice crispy bits.

  • Roanne

    Great recipe. Do you think it could be used to make baby back ribs?

  • Roanne

    Great recipe. Do you think it could be used to make baby back ribs?

  • http://www.everydaycookin.blogspot.com/ Darius T. williams

    So – here’s what I’m thinking…you cook it – and I’ll eat it and do the dishes – lol.

  • http://www.everydaycookin.blogspot.com Darius T. williams

    So – here’s what I’m thinking…you cook it – and I’ll eat it and do the dishes – lol.

  • http://voodoolily.blogspot.com/ Heather

    I almost didn’t recognize this without the Red #5 on it! This looks awesome. I’d still eat it with hot mustard and sesame seeds (I totally buy the fuchsia-red stuff and eat it straight from the package sometimes).

  • http://voodoolily.blogspot.com Heather

    I almost didn’t recognize this without the Red #5 on it! This looks awesome. I’d still eat it with hot mustard and sesame seeds (I totally buy the fuchsia-red stuff and eat it straight from the package sometimes).

  • http://www.biz319.wordpress.com/ Biz

    I’ve never had that before, but it yours looks delish! I’ve seen it at restaurants, but like you said, it almost has an artificial color to it!

  • http://www.biz319.wordpress.com Biz

    I’ve never had that before, but it yours looks delish! I’ve seen it at restaurants, but like you said, it almost has an artificial color to it!

  • http://www.practicallydone.com/ helen

    In a bao or puff pastry. This is very much a Cantonese dish, which is what most Chinatowns in North America are about.

    Yours looks lovely!

  • http://www.practicallydone.com helen

    In a bao or puff pastry. This is very much a Cantonese dish, which is what most Chinatowns in North America are about.

    Yours looks lovely!

  • http://vindelatable.blogspot.com/ Vin de la Table

    After a night with char siu over rice and a glass of Vouvray or other Loire Valley Chenin Blanc, I’d look forward to having the marinated leftovers in the morning topped with a fried egg. And perhaps not the wine, unless I wake up after noon.

  • http://vindelatable.blogspot.com Vin de la Table

    After a night with char siu over rice and a glass of Vouvray or other Loire Valley Chenin Blanc, I’d look forward to having the marinated leftovers in the morning topped with a fried egg. And perhaps not the wine, unless I wake up after noon.

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  • http://onefilipinodish.com/ paoix

    i love bbq pork. and this one looks amazing i’ll have to cook this soon! :) thanks!

  • http://onefilipinodish.com paoix

    i love bbq pork. and this one looks amazing i’ll have to cook this soon! :) thanks!

  • http://www.bytes-from-texas.blogspot.com/ Lauren

    Can’t wait to try this one at home!

  • http://www.bytes-from-texas.blogspot.com Lauren

    Can’t wait to try this one at home!

  • http://www.kalofagas.blogspot.com/ Peter

    Gorgeous, redolent and a delight to have Asian dishes like this demystified for gwei-lo’ such as myself.

  • http://www.kalofagas.blogspot.com Peter

    Gorgeous, redolent and a delight to have Asian dishes like this demystified for gwei-lo’ such as myself.

  • http://gagainthekitchen.blogspot.com/ gaga

    I love charsiu. Yours looks beautiful. The color is wonderful and I’m sure it tastes great!

  • http://gagainthekitchen.blogspot.com gaga

    I love charsiu. Yours looks beautiful. The color is wonderful and I’m sure it tastes great!

  • http://indonesia-eats.blogspot.com/ Pepy

    Marc, red yeast rice is the secret to get red coloured. In Indonesia, this rice is commonly used for BBQ Duck or Phoenix Talons. Red yeast rice can be read at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_yeast_rice .

    I actually made phoenix talons a month ago.

  • http://indonesia-eats.blogspot.com Pepy

    Marc, red yeast rice is the secret to get red coloured. In Indonesia, this rice is commonly used for BBQ Duck or Phoenix Talons. Red yeast rice can be read at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_yeast_rice .

    I actually made phoenix talons a month ago.

  • marc

    Thanks HoneyB, give it a go, it’s not too complicated:-)

    Matt, I’ll totally have to make you a batch… Maybe in the new year?

    Thanks Kian, I can’t remember how many times I’ve had it while I worked in Chinatown, but it never grew old.

    Peter G thanks, so then what’s the queen of all pork dishes?

    Mengmeng, not weird at all. Thanks for stopping by and leaving a note. Keep in touch:-)

    Thanks Brooke:-)

    Mark, I’m a big fan of char siu bau too. I think that’ll be my next project to tackle.

    Carey, thanks for sharing your story. I’ve been looking for a good bau recipe (the light fluffy white kind, not the more doughy kind), but I haven’t found any in english. I’m going to do some experimentation and post when I get it right.

    Lorraine, I inevitably see your tweets at 2am at which point I should be getting ready for bed, but instead find myself wandering over to the fridge.

    Rasa Malaysia, oooOOO that sounds really good, are the noodles crispy?

    Nate, I’m kind of curious about the non-bake char siu now. Was it fried?

    Roanne, it certainly could, although you may want to cook the ribs longer at a lower temperature. Ribs have a lot of connective tissue that need to break down in order for them to get tender.

    Darius, I have a standing arrangement with all my friends that if they come by with ingredients, I’ll cook them whatever they want.

    Heather, yea I had the same reaction at first, although now when I walk by the windows they just don’t seem as appetizing.

    Thanks Biz and Helen:-)

    Vin de la Table, I’m going to have to go wine shopping now:-) Thanks for the suggestions! Oh and wine is good any hour of the day.

    Thanks Paoix and Lauren!

    Peter, lol!

    Thanks gaga

    Pepy, thanks for the tip. I’ll have to look for some the next time I’m in Chinatown:-)

  • marc

    Thanks HoneyB, give it a go, it’s not too complicated:-)

    Matt, I’ll totally have to make you a batch… Maybe in the new year?

    Thanks Kian, I can’t remember how many times I’ve had it while I worked in Chinatown, but it never grew old.

    Peter G thanks, so then what’s the queen of all pork dishes?

    Mengmeng, not weird at all. Thanks for stopping by and leaving a note. Keep in touch:-)

    Thanks Brooke:-)

    Mark, I’m a big fan of char siu bau too. I think that’ll be my next project to tackle.

    Carey, thanks for sharing your story. I’ve been looking for a good bau recipe (the light fluffy white kind, not the more doughy kind), but I haven’t found any in english. I’m going to do some experimentation and post when I get it right.

    Lorraine, I inevitably see your tweets at 2am at which point I should be getting ready for bed, but instead find myself wandering over to the fridge.

    Rasa Malaysia, oooOOO that sounds really good, are the noodles crispy?

    Nate, I’m kind of curious about the non-bake char siu now. Was it fried?

    Roanne, it certainly could, although you may want to cook the ribs longer at a lower temperature. Ribs have a lot of connective tissue that need to break down in order for them to get tender.

    Darius, I have a standing arrangement with all my friends that if they come by with ingredients, I’ll cook them whatever they want.

    Heather, yea I had the same reaction at first, although now when I walk by the windows they just don’t seem as appetizing.

    Thanks Biz and Helen:-)

    Vin de la Table, I’m going to have to go wine shopping now:-) Thanks for the suggestions! Oh and wine is good any hour of the day.

    Thanks Paoix and Lauren!

    Peter, lol!

    Thanks gaga

    Pepy, thanks for the tip. I’ll have to look for some the next time I’m in Chinatown:-)

  • http://www.takeitlikeit.blogspot.com/ CourtJ

    The pictures look so good they make me want to lick my fingers :-)

  • http://www.takeitlikeit.blogspot.com CourtJ

    The pictures look so good they make me want to lick my fingers :-)

  • http://allthingsnice.typepad.com/ Syrie

    Marc, I’ll definitely be making this. It looks absolutely fantastic. I always eat char sui in Bangkok with rice, pickles, green onions and boiled eggs.

  • http://allthingsnice.typepad.com Syrie

    Marc, I’ll definitely be making this. It looks absolutely fantastic. I always eat char sui in Bangkok with rice, pickles, green onions and boiled eggs.

  • http://www.elinluv.blogspot.com/ elin

    Wow….a wonderful one by looking at the photos. Will try it out. A good one indeed! Thanks for sharing.

  • http://www.elinluv.blogspot.com elin

    Wow….a wonderful one by looking at the photos. Will try it out. A good one indeed! Thanks for sharing.

  • http://aloshaskitchen.blogspot.com/ Melissa

    How do I like it? Any which way you put it in front of me!! When it’s good, it’s reeeeeally good. Love love love.

    As Peter said, thanks for demystifying. Nice job.

  • http://aloshaskitchen.blogspot.com Melissa

    How do I like it? Any which way you put it in front of me!! When it’s good, it’s reeeeeally good. Love love love.

    As Peter said, thanks for demystifying. Nice job.

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  • http://closetcooking.blogspot.com/ Kevin

    That pork looks really tasty!

  • http://closetcooking.blogspot.com/ Kevin

    That pork looks really tasty!

  • Piercival

    Marc,

    When I saw this I knew I had to make it. I bought pork belly with the bones in. Since it was in a larger piece I let it marinade for 3 days …well also because I had been to multiple Asian markets and could not find the Sichuan pepper. Finally hit paydirt at the Richmond 99 Ranch Market

    Other than that, it was to your spec. The final result was spectacular, among the best I’ve ever tasted.

    Thanks Marc!

  • Piercival

    Marc,

    When I saw this I knew I had to make it. I bought pork belly with the bones in. Since it was in a larger piece I let it marinade for 3 days …well also because I had been to multiple Asian markets and could not find the Sichuan pepper. Finally hit paydirt at the Richmond 99 Ranch Market

    Other than that, it was to your spec. The final result was spectacular, among the best I’ve ever tasted.

    Thanks Marc!

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  • http://superfinefeline.blogspot.com/ superfinefeline

    This looks fab and I’m tempted to try the recipe even though I’m not a huge fan of char siew!

  • http://superfinefeline.blogspot.com/ superfinefeline

    This looks fab and I’m tempted to try the recipe even though I’m not a huge fan of char siew!

  • http://sunshinemom.blogspot.com/ Suzanne

    Mmmm…that looks super yummy!!

  • http://sunshinemom.blogspot.com/ Suzanne

    Mmmm…that looks super yummy!!

  • http://www.thedishsdish.com/blog Cecily@AllThingsDelicious

    Growing up in Hawaii, I’ve had a lot of Char Siu in my life, but never homemade! Do you ever turn your pork into Char Siu Bao??

  • http://www.thedishsdish.com/blog Cecily@AllThingsDelicious

    Growing up in Hawaii, I’ve had a lot of Char Siu in my life, but never homemade! Do you ever turn your pork into Char Siu Bao??

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  • http://hungryjenny.blogspot.com Hungry Jenny

    Mmmm! Just stumbled across this and it’s reminded me that it’s still on my list of things to make! I’ve made char siu sauce for chicken thighs and drumsticks but really want to go the whole hog (ha,ha) and make with pork belly.

    Hungry Jenny x

  • http://hungryjenny.blogspot.com/ Hungry Jenny

    Mmmm! Just stumbled across this and it’s reminded me that it’s still on my list of things to make! I’ve made char siu sauce for chicken thighs and drumsticks but really want to go the whole hog (ha,ha) and make with pork belly.

    Hungry Jenny x

  • http://Saltygal.blogspot.com/ Karen

    My daughter is allergic to red dye so I’ve started making my own. Your variation sounds delicious, can’t wait to try it.

  • http://Saltygal.blogspot.com Karen

    My daughter is allergic to red dye so I’ve started making my own. Your variation sounds delicious, can’t wait to try it.

  • Andrea

    That pork looks really tasty!
    I have simple question: you say that the oven temperature should be 275, and assuming you live in the united states, do you mean 275 degrees Fahrenheit or Celsius? I live in Italy so it's a little confusing for me.
    Thanks in advance and keep up the good work!

  • norecipes

    Hi Andrea, living here I sometimes forget that the rest of the world
    uses celsius, sorry about that. It should be 275 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Dean

    please excuse my language, not good in talking or explaining , juat wanna share this with y'all :
    mix some rose wine instead of using all rice wine, use hoisin sauce to replace the 5 spice and garlic, cure it with some sugar, use some peanut butter too. add an egg to 1 kg of meat, use pork nape, dont cut into long strips on cross grains, you need the cross grain at last while cooked. maltose and darksoy burn easily,dont use that for marinating. must soak for min 48 hours. 210 c 10 mins, 220 c 5 mins. lessen sugar if burns appear. must have some burns at the edges of meats. use honey if cant find the golden syrup. brush the honey on to char siu after roasting. let the honey drip-off a bit before carving it.

    happy cooking.

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  • Marti

    Amazing food… what fantastic cook. !!!!!!!

  • wanona

    Sounds  good  I   will  give  it  a  try

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  • Coffeelad

    I couldn’t find Maltose so I substituted corn syrup. I also added 1tsp of ketchup. a little more red color. 

  • LDB

    Had this for dinner over rice tonight. Followed the recipe exactly and let rest for 15 minutes before slicing. It was insane!!!! I have eaten a lot of Char Siu over the years and this is the best! Thanks Marc, this is going on high rotation in our house!

  • Tonybuck

    Totally wrong Char siu recipe…………….Soy Sauce,Honey,Brown Sugar, Cinnamon,Garlic,green onion,ginger and red food coloring=10 times better!!

    • Margie de la O

      How much of each?????

  • Deanlawsutera

    Cinnamon? LMAO…..where did you learn that??? Hell no!

    • Nobahd2600

      Well to be fair Cinnamon is one of the 5 spices in Asian 5 spice you buy from the store

  • http://www.redrocknoodlebar.com.au/ red rock noodle bar

    It looks perfect! I would add little bit more of herbs just to look more natural.

  • Jade Leigh

    For colour and depth of flavour, black strap molasses might be better than honey as a substitute for maltose. I can’t wait to try this, and I love your cooking philosophy!

  • http://www.facebook.com/jengelmeow Jengel Bells

    Phenominal!!! My frist try at Chinese cooking and I’m hooked! Your recipe worked perfectly – I will be trying many more from you :)

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  • a parisian girl

    This is by far the best recipe I’ve come across. I made it last week and it was DELICIOUS! Thank you!

  • DE

    interesting. close to the ancient chinese recipe my family has been using for generations and selling in chinatown and ranked best in seattle

  • krstie

    how would you make this in a pork bun would you need to make more of the sauce or stay the same?

  • http://www.facebook.com/marc.brevoort Marc Brevoort

    I like how you use a spoon of pureed kiwi. Hardly an authentic addition, but it won’t change the flavour by much and the enzymes in there will help tenderize the meat.

    • Samson

      Kiwi is originally a Chinese fruit, cultivated through new zealand, who named the fruit after the kiwi bird. It could very well have been a traditional and authentic addition.

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  • Alvin Eng

    This is very similar to a recipe my Mother got from one of the Seattle restaurants years ago. The real secret to the Red color is NOT any added Red Dye! Our recipe contained just 1/4 tsp of saltpeter (Potassium Nitrite) or Curing Salt which is also used in Corned Beef to give it its Red color, too! Using saltpeter will keep the pork red instead of browning as it cooks!

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Alvin, thanks for the comment. Saltpeter will indeed make the meat pinkish red, but I try not to use it as its a known carcinogen. In that sense it’s probably better for you to use red food coloring than to add saltpeter.

  • http://www.eatwithjess.com/ Jessica Jann

    I Loved this post! Thanks so much for sharing! Its one of my favorite dishes!

  • Carmichael

    Would pork loin work well for this recipe?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Pork loin is too lean. You could use the marinade but would have to change the cooking method or you’ll end up with tough dry meat.

  • LMM

    Just made the marinade without the kiwi. Marinaded pork chops, then pan fried them. Excellent. Had extra and put some on left over chicken, also excellent.

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  • http://bbq4dummies.com/ John Wallace

    Great recipe, taste reminds me of how Char Siu tasted when I was a kid in Portland, Using Mark’s recipe, I adapted it to grilling on a Weber. If interested, the pictures and technique are here: http://bbq4dummies.com/2013/09/char-siu-chinese-barbecued-pork-authentic-and-delicious-on-a-charcoal-or-gas-grill/

  • Motherhen

    Just tried this recipe. Meat marinated for 24 hours. Meat came out looking unappealingly brown/black not red like your picture and not because of burnt. Did not taste like Chinese char siu at all.

  • Kai

    Thanks a lot Marc for this great recipe! Mine is though a little brownish, but that’s not at a problem at all since it is tasting exactly like Char Siu in Guangzhou (China). After my leave from Guangzhou i missed this soo much, and this is exactly what I needed!
    The only difference is that I used instead of the chili sauce mostly “bean and garlic paste” and a bit of the chili sauce (because my thai chili sauce was extremely spicy). Worked out perfectly. Again I can’t thank you enough. You made my day!

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Welcome!

I'm Marc, and I want to teach you some basic techniques and give you the confidence and inspiration so that you can cook without recipes too!

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Spaghetti Alle Vongole
Butter Fried Flounder Roe
Sea Urchin Ceviche