Marinated Japanese Mushrooms

Marinated Japanese Mushrooms

Thanks to a sale at the local grocery store, I found myself walking home with a 3-pack of Japanese mushrooms for $3! I was so bowled-over by the price, I forgot the fact that I was also packing for a one week trip to Sonoma. Since these mushrooms were clearly on sale for a reason, I put the odds of them being usable when I got back at next to none.

They say necessity is the mother of all invention. Well, I had 3 bundles of gorgeous mushrooms on my hands with almost no opportunity to eat them. Given that I often pickle vegetables when I know I’m not going to eat them right away, my mind immediately turned to preservation.

Marinated Japanese Mushrooms

But pickled mushrooms?! No way! That’s when it occurred to me that these might be good sautéed, then marinated. Since they’re Japanese mushrooms, I decided to go with a Japanese style marinade. The soy sauce boosts the natural umami in the mushrooms while the vinegar makes for a tangy preservative.

The mitsuba and shiso lend an awesome cedar/mint flavor, but if you’re not able to find these herbs, basil and cilantro would taste great too. Better yet, if you do decide to go that route, try substituting the soy sauce for fish sauce and the vinegar for lime juice.

Marinated Japanese Mushrooms

2 tablespoons olive oil
3 packs Japanese mushrooms (such as shimeji, enoki, maitake, shiitake, or nameko)
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 tablespoon dashi soy sauce (regular soy sauce will work)
1 red chili pepper
2 tablespoons chopped mitsuba
1 tablespoon chopped green shiso

Heat the olive oil in a frying pan over high heat, then add the mushrooms. Stir-fry until the mushrooms are cooked and there is little to no liquid in the pan.

Remove the pan from the heat, and then add the rice vinegar, soy sauce, chili pepper, mitsuba and shiso. Stir to combine, then add salt to taste. When the mushrooms have cooled, put them in a tupperware and refrigerate until you are ready to serve them.

These marinated mushrooms make a great appetizer or side and can be served on noodles, on top of pasta, or just by themselves.

  • http://twitter.com/RosasYummyYums Rosa May

    Those are fabulous and must taste wonderful! They look pretty too.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • http://www.dinnersanddreams.net Nisrine M.

    Those mushrooms are beautiful and the sauce looks, well, to die for.

  • http://theindolentcook.blogspot.com/ leaf (the indolent cook)

    That marinade looks fabulous!

  • http://www.bevcooks.com Bev Weidner

    I am SO in love with mushrooms and that this post has me shivering with giddiness.
    O.
    M.
    G.

  • http://www.bevcooks.com Bev Weidner

    I am SO in love with mushrooms and that this post has me shivering with giddiness.
    O.
    M.
    G.

  • Lee

    I am a mushroom lover, especially the wild ones! I’ll gonna try this recipe soon!

  • Lauren Data

    I am not a fungus type…but the photographer makes this dish look delicious. :-)

  • http://www.thefoodpirates.com/ Darren Tran

    I’ve said this before and I’ll say this again:  your pictures look absolutely fantastic.  The presentation of your food is amazing too.  I swear even if you burned your food, you would still somehow make it look wonderful lol

  • http://www.kalynskitchen.com Kalynskitchen

    What a score and it sounds like a delicious way to save them!

  • http://www.ouichefnetwork.com Oui, Chef

    These look gorgeous, and I bet they taste even better!  Shiso and mitsuba will be impossible for me to find, what do you think about mint and basil?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Thanks! Mint and Basil have a totally different flavor profile, so while I don’t think it would taste bad, it might be more interesting to just run with it and do a Southeast Asian marinade using fish sauce and lime juice.

  • Avocadorable.com

    At my local grocery store, maitake is about $4 a pack, and shiitake is about $7 per pound :( I need to find out where you live :) Your post is amazing.  It just took me back to Japan for a second…

  • Ravenouscouple

    had some in seattle recently, this is exactly what we need to remake the meal! thanks!

  • http://thelittleloaf.wordpress.com Thelittleloaf

    What a gorgeous simple recipe. I’m not sure where I’d find mitsuba or shisho but I’m determined to find out as this dish looks right up my street!

  • http://www.tastewiththeeyes.com/ Lori Lynn

    Hi Marc – I love this recipe. I am always buying mushrooms at our local Japanese market, I can’t help myself, they are so lovely. Sadly I just threw out an old package of maitake. I wish I read your post 2 weeks ago. I will keep this handy.
    LL

  • http://templates.motocms.com/ nik

    Thanks for sharing such useful information. I think this is really a very nice post. Thanks for the great content!

  • Angela@Spinachtiger

     I just watched you on Chopped. I thought you did great and should not have been chopped. I would have sent the gal that forgot her sauce home. I think it’s awesome that you got to participate.

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    Wow this is sooo delicious!!!) Can`t watch…..!!! Ufffff so nice!

  • http://customresearchpaper.net/ research papers

    Thanks for sharing such helpful information. I think this is really a very nice post. Thanks for the great content!

  • http://termpaperwriter.org/ research papers

    mmmmm…. I want to try it!

  • http://mjskitchen.com Mjskit

    These mushrooms and your marinade sound wonderful!  What a find with those mushrooms!

  • Sarah Peek

    :D i get to make this for my 18 birthday! Yay! I wonder how i could incorporate this in to oden?

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Happy birthday! While the flavors are a little different, this might make a nice contrasting dish alongside oden rather than in it. Otherwise if you just want to put mushrooms in oden, try filling a pouch of abura-age (thinly sliced deep-fried tofu) with some mochi and diced mushrooms, then tying the pouch shut and simmering with the oden.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Marios-Ioannou/100001981933016 Marios Ioannou

    hi i am marios from cyprus and i dont have idea what is the mitsuba and shiso can u help me i like japanese food but they have different name like miso tofu and more

     

    • http://norecipes.com Marc Matsumoto

      Hi Marios, their botanical names are: “Cryptotaenia” (mitsuba) and “Perilla” (shiso). If you look them up on wikipedia you should be able to find all the information you need to know.

  • Tiffany

    I am so trying this on Saturday when I make my trip to the Asian Market. THANK YOU!

  • Hong

    I had just tried this one a few days ago and it was surprisingly refreshing and tasty! The process was easy and Marc’s instruction is just perfect! Thanks so much for giving us another item to enjoy!

  • KD

    Marc, I have a serious problem w/your recipe:

    #1: I love mushrooms

    #2: I had problems getting these morsels past the saute stage to incorporate the vinegar for preserving.

    #3: After putting the vinegar mixture into the mushrooms & tasting for possible correction…I met with further problems…that is — to leave any of it to the “preservation” stage.

    #4: Assuming I actually am able to preserve these morsels, how long can I preserve them for?

    #5: What am I doing wrong that I can’t get past problem #3?
    :-D

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